Pleasant Hemphill's Deposition - 1873

1873 Deposition of Pleasant Hemphill in the Southern Claims File of Mary Lemons Buie
Lincoln County, Mississippi
October 1873
Transcribed by Linda Durr Rudd

Pleasant Hemphill was the Buie family's overseer in 1863.

Testimony

Pleasant Hemphill testifies: Age 63; residence Lincoln County, Miss.; farmer. I have been acquainted with the Buie family since 1853. I moved in their immediate neighborhood at that time, and became very well acquainted with the family, and from the commencement of the war to its close, I lived in the immediate vicinity of their place and in 1863 I was employed by John Buie to manage their place, when I went to it, and lived in the same house with them, and thus am well acquainted with their sentiments in regard to the war as any person. The Buie family consisted of John M. Buie aged between 35 and 40, then Daniel between 25 and 30 then Zach about 22 or 23, and Mary his twin sister about the same age. I am speaking of their ages at the present time. Their father died in 1862. There was a brother named Neal H. Buie that I think was wounded in the Confederate army. He was some younger than John.

Their mother died two or three years ago. Neal H. was in the Confederate army and I think Daniel was in for a short time. I am satisfied that they were conscripted. The family had a reputation of being Union people and I know that John bitterly opposed to the war. He was never in the war to my knowledge. I know that he used to keep out of the way when the Confederate Cav., were around. He used to say to me that he did not believe war or secession was right. He did not talk to me much about the war. I was a states right man and believed in the war and thought it right. John knew my sentiments and probably that was the reason why he did not talk to me more frequently about the war. The family were regarded in the neighborhood as being opposed to it. I donít know whether they did or not after the negroes were to be freed. I think then that they felt that the South ought to secceed, they had a good many negroes, about forty hands. I never heard them say that they were in favor of the war. I have heard John talk against it. He is the only one I had any conversations with of any account.



Source

NARA - Record Group 123 - United States Court of Claims - Congressional Jurisdiction - Southern Claim File of Mary Buie - Case # 2568

Southern Claims Case of Mary Buie

Remembering Their Names