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2. Shotton from the 13th Century

 

By the 13th century Shotton was spelled "Schotton." Killins farm was at this time owned by Roger de Montalt, justice of Chester and Lord of Mold and Hawarden. In 1256 Montalt added Ewloe to his lordship and Shotton was brought under the control of Ewloe Manor. It was Montalt's enclosure of Ewloe wood as a private hunting ground that angered the Welsh prince Llywelyn ap Gruffydd. This led to Llywelyn evicting Montalt and building Ewloe Castle in the next year, to keep the English out.

 

Castell Ewloe (Ewloe Castle) in Wepre Woods is a native Welsh castle built by Prince Llywelyn.

 

 

 

 

       

Following Montalt's death in 1275, Ewloe and its holdings passed into Crown ownership. A Flint Plea of 11th January 1284 stated:

"The Lord Edward, illustrious King of England ... offered himself [in an action] against Joan [widow of Montalt] ... that she return to him the Villa de Kelenges, with its appurtenances, 97 acres of land at Aston and 58 acres with its appurtenances at Shotton"

Ewloe Manor and its holdings appear as Crown property throughout the 14th century.

The spelling of the name of Shotton has changed throughout history and these changes are detailed below:

Scotton .................................................... 1283 - 5

Shatton .....................................................1283 - 5

Scotton .................................................... 1301 - 4

Shotton ............................................... 1442, 1553

Shotten ..................................... 1576, 1598, 1620

Shottin ......................................................... 1654

Shotton ........................................................ 1699

Shotten ........................................................ 1743

Shotton-in-Hawarden ................................. 1913

Around the mid 1500's coal mining began in the "Old Banks" region of the town and the adjacent Wepre woods. A fault lies along the Wepre Brook ravine and coal can still be seen cropping out in places along the steep banks of the brook. Although the mining was only on a small scale, many shafts were sunk sporadically over a number of years. Another group of shafts were opened around 1600 and on the northern half of this area the house and garden of Oak Tree Cottage in Killins Lane were built, where shale and coal slack can still be seen in places. Oak Tree cottage was demolished a few years ago and a smallgroup of modern houses now stand on the site. Mrs Kenyon once lived in this house and her son, who served in the RAF, was responsible for flying the Canberra Bomber that carried the film of the Queen's coronation in June 1953 to Canada.

Oak Tree Cottage c. 1930

 

These mines could explain why there was an increase in building activity near to the Wepre Brook. A hamlet of small cottages were built around 1600 at the junction of two lanes, now known as Woodland Street and Brook Road. They were built of stone with thatched roofs and were known as the "Nine Houses." Despite the name, it is believed that there were actually only eight. Nothing remains today of the Nine Houses, but the area is still referred to by that name, particularly by older residents.

 

 

The first Public House to exist in Shotton is believed to be the "Star Chamber Ale House." It is mentioned in documents dated 1675, 1759 and 1785. Its location is uncertain but it is thought to have been at the end of Shotton Lane, near to where Walnut Cottage now stands.

Copyright Keith Atkinson 1998 - 2006

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