TURKISH NAMES FOR TURKISH DOGS - MAIN PAGE I've always felt that giving my Turkish dogs Turkish names was a means of showing respect for a breed that has been around for thousands of years with such a rich history. Each pup is given a formal Turkish name, with a simple 'call' name used on a daily basis.

While I am always looking for the "perfect" names for my pups, I began some time ago to compile a list of these Turkish names, with their meaning beside them. I know over the years that I've spent an inordinate amount of time day-dreaming about the names picked for my newest litters. Sometimes they are given just one name, or sometimes a combination of words that will reflect what they mean to me or their new owners.

The following list is by no means the only Turkish names available, but it's a glimpse into the richness of the Turkish language. This is a work in progress that I revise as necessary.

TURKISH NAMES FOR TURKISH DOGS!!

[A] - [B] - [C] - [D] - [E] - [F] - [G] - [H]

[I] - [J] - [K] - [L] - [M] - [N] - [O] - [P]

[R] - [S] - [T] - [U] - [V] - [Y] - [Z]

<*><*><*><*><*><*><*><*><*><*><*><*><*><*><*>

Turkish Dictionary
Powered by
Turkish Dictionary
Language: Direction:
Into English
From English
Word:

TURKISH CHARACTERS AND PRONUNCIATION GUIDE

Many of the pages on these sites contain words in Turkish. Modern Turkish is written in the Latin alphabet but it contains a number of characters that are not found in English. These are presented in the table below.

(There should be five examples of each character after the colon.)

a-circumflex:

A-circumflex:

c-cedilla:

C-cedilla:

g-hacek:

G-hacek:

undotted i:

dotted I:

i-circumflex:

I-circumflex:

o-umlaut:

O-umlaut:

s-cedilla:

S-cedilla:

u-umlaut:

U-umlaut:

â â â â â

    Â

ç ç ç ç ç

Ç Ç Ç Ç Ç

ggggg

GGGGG

iiiii

IIIII

î î î î î

Î Î Î Î Î

ö ö ö ö ö

Ö Ö Ö Ö Ö

Ş Ş Ş Ş

ş ş ş ş

ü ü ü ü ü

Ü Ü Ü Ü Ü

The pronunciation values of Turkish letters never change the way they frequently do in English: a letter or combination of letters always represents the same sound in Turkish. Some of these values are the same as they are in English but many are not and quite a few are misleading. Here are the chief trouble-makers:

a/A: The "a" in "father".

ay/AY: The "y" n "sky"; the "igh" in "light"; the "uy" in "buy". Say, which is pronounced "sigh", is the Turkish word for "count". Bay, which is pronounced "buy" is the Turkish word for "mister".

â/Â: A slightly palatalized or lengthened "a". There is no exact English equivalent of this sound. In any case it's mostly a spelling convention nowadays.

c/C: The "j" and "dj" in "judge". Can, which pronounced "john", is the Turkish word for "soul".

ç/Ç: The "ch" in "church". Çap, which is pronounced "chop", is the Turkish word for "diameter".

e/E: The "e" in "get".

ey/EY: The "a" in "plate"; the "ei" n "eight"; the "ay" in "say". Ney, which is pronounced "neigh", is the Turkish word for a kind of reed-flute favored by Mevlevi dervishes. Bey, which is pronounced "bay", is the old Turkish word for "sir" (as in the English "Sir John").

g/G: The "g" in "gag".

ğ/Ğ: Always follows a vowel, which it lengthens. It is not otherwise pronounced.

ı/I: The "u" in "minute"; the first syllable of "Missouri" as pronounced by a native of that state.

i/İ: The "i" in "sit".

iy/İY: The "ee" in "tree"; the "ea" in "sea".

î/Î: A spelling convention. The pronunciation will depend on whether the letter represents "i" or "ı".

j/J: The "ge" in "rouge".

o/O: Something midway between the "ough" in "ought" and the "oa" in "oat". Ot, the Turkish word for "herb", "weed" or "grass" has a pronunciation value that falls between those two English words.

ö/Ö: While pronouncing the English word "says" pinch in both your cheeks with your hand so that your lips get rounded. Congratulations: you have just pronounced söz, the Turkish word for "word". Göte is how the German name "Goethe" is transcribed into the Turkish alphabet.

Ş: The "sh" in "shoe" and "cash".

u/U: Something between the "u" in "put" and the "oo" in "poot". Put, the Turkish word for "idol" has a pronunciation value that falls between those two English words but is somewhat closer to English "put".

uy/UY: Say "dewy" in one syllable and you will have pronounced something close to duy, the Turkish word for "light socket".

ü/Ü: While pronouncing the English word "sit" pinch in both your cheeks with your hand so that your lips get rounded. Congratulations: this time you've pronounced süt, the Turkish word for "milk". Süspansiyon is how the French pronunciation of "suspension" is transcribed into the Turkish alphabet.

One more note. In Turkish all letters are pronounced. (There are no "silent" letters as in English.) Furthermore, every vowel represents a separate syllable. Thus the word surname is pronounced with three syllables: /sur/ + /na/ + /me/.


This page copyright by Sandra King. All rights reserved. No part of this page; text, images or content can be used without written permission of author.