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Little boys and starlight

I

 

                  His big blue eyes, much too big for his little boy face and very rare among the Noldor, darted about the people nervously.  He sat, head between his hands, watching everyone pass him by with no heed and his eyes began to water.  He was all alone.  His father had sent him here.  He wrinkled his tiny pug nose at the fish scent, wishing to smell the sweet pines and elanor and then sighed.  Where were the animals?  Or people he knew?  One tear leaked from the corner of his striking cobalt blue eyes.

                  His dark, almost red-tinted black hair move like rushing water as he viciously wiped his eyes.  His grandfather had died and then father had sent him here, to the Sea.  The 5-year old looked around curiously.  Maybe it wouldn’t- He abruptly shook his head.  No place would be home like Gondolin had been.

                  Dusk had come and the Elves began to clear away to their havens, still taking no notice of the little boy seated atop a small chest.  His bottom lip puckered, beginning to tremble as Ithil began its rise in the night sky.  Tears blurred his vision, but he made no move to dry them.  A soft hand lifted up his chin and he beheld a beautiful caring blonde she-Elf.

                  “ Little Ereinion, cry no more.  No one told us until late that you had arrived,” she said.

                  “ I wanna go home,” he whispered, “ I want my Ada and the trees and pretty starlight.”

She smiled at his list of wants, glancing up at the faint stars.

                  “ Come here, little gilgalad lover,” she pulled him close.

                  Celeborn slowly approached his kneeling wife. 

                  “ Is he…” he began to ask.

Two big pools of blue peeked up at him, full of tears.  Never had Celeborn felt the need for a child until now.

                  “ When will I go home?  Did they send me here because I was bad?” Ereinion asked worriedly, using his fists to wipe away his tears.

Celeborn knelt before him.

                  “ No, you’ve come here to learn the ways of an Elf-lord and king.  Círdan and I will teach you,” he said.

                  “ When will Ada come?” Ereinion asked.

                  Celeborn and Galadriel exchanged a glance.  How do you tell a child that his parent cannot come because it is too dangerous for him to be close to the heir lest Morgorth kill them?  Or that the one he has called Ada is not even his real father?

                  “ Soon, Gil-galad, soon,” Galadriel finally answered.

                  His whole face lit up.  He laid his head on Galadriel’s shoulder.  Galadriel swept away his dark hair from his face, marveling at the silkiness it retained.  She carried him as some servants carried the small chest for the couple.  Ereinion’s thumb crept towards his mouth, still having retained the childish habit not yet broken.  Galadriel pulled it away, sending him a gentle smile.

                  They entered their haven and already he was asleep.  Galadriel gently caressed his face, leaving a gentle kiss on his forehead as she laid him on the bed they had prepared for him.  Ereinion stirred.

                  “ I need bear,” he began to whimper.

Celeborn searched the chest frantically as Ereinion’s cries became louder, finally holding a worn blanket with a bear on it questioningly.  Ereinion took it readily, clutching it as he drifted back to sleep.

                  Celeborn bent beside his wife to watch Ereinion sleep.

                  “ They are so lucky to have a child, yet they send him away,” Galadriel whispered.

                  “ One day, dear.  Do not rush it,” Celeborn brushed away her stray pieces of gold from her forehead to lay a gentle kiss upon the skin, “ Come to bed.  He will be awake early and already I can see that he will be Círdan’s terror.”

Galadriel smoothed the boy’s hair one last time before following him into their adjoining room.  Moonlight lit the little boy face that would never change in neither sleep nor death.