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GENDER TERMS
WORDS WE SPEAK,
WORDS WE TWEAK
 

The following glossary of terms and definitions help provide a common language for discussing gender identity and transgender issues. The glossary incorporates vocabulary from various sources and will continue to evolve as dialogue on gender, trans, intersex, queer, same-gender loving and LGB issues evolves. Recognizing the importance of clarity in communication on issues related to gender and sexuality, we encourage frank discussion and shared understanding regarding the language used to talk about these issues.

Each 
            person has the right to define their gender for themselves. To question 
            one’s gender identity, and explore or play with gender expression 
            is healthy, normal, and something to be celebrated. We believe no 
            one should feel obligated to unquestioningly accept the gender identity 
            assigned to them. We encourage everyone to use vocabulary and terms 
            that feel right for your experiences.

This dictionary was created by t. aaron hans © 1996, 2001, 2003. All Rights Reserved.  
 
GENDER TERMS are listed below, CLICK a letter to jump to that section...
A - B - C - D - E - F - G - H - I - J-K-L - M - N - O - P - Q - R - S - T - U-V-W - X-Y-Z
 
A
additional pronouns
Pronouns such as “ze,” “hir,” and “per,” which do not denote rigid masculinity or femininity. Coined by trans activists and scholars, such gender-bending pronouns emerged (and may continue to emerge) in opposition to, and in recognition of, the insufficiency of gender-specific pronouns (i.e., him, her, his, hers, she, and he) to refer to trans and gender-variant people. (See also ZE, HIR, PER.)
androgyny
(also androgynous)
A person who expresses and/or presents merged culturally/socially defined feminine and masculine characteristics, or mainly neutral characteristics. May or may not express dual gender identity.
assigned gender
The declaration by doctors of what one’s gender is based upon what one’s genitalia appear to be. One is then expected to grow up and exist within a certain set of gender roles “appropriate” to one’s assigned gender. (See also GENDER [SEX] ASSIGNMENT).
B
bi-gender
A person who identifies as both or some combination of the two culturally prevalent genders. A bi-gender individual may shift their gender identity and/or expression from one gender to another, or a combination of genders, in ways that make sense to them – such shifting may occur on an hourly, daily, monthly, or yearly basis.
binary gender system
A culturally/socially defined code of acceptable behaviors which teach that there are men and women, who are masculine and feminine, and that there is nothing outside of this system. Most popular discussion on gender assumes a binary gender system. Discussion of trans issues and identities, however, challenges a binary gender system and forces us to think of gender within a multi-gender system.
binding
The practice of wrapping or taping in order to compress the chest or “breast tissue” so that one can pass as a man. This is done with extremely tight bras, elastic bandages, and other methods.
biphobia
The irrational fear of people perceived as bisexual. Biphobia also includes refuting the existence of bisexuality by promoting the belief that every individual is either homosexual or heterosexual.
bisexual (BI)
An individual who is emotionally, spiritually, physically, and/or sexually attracted to those of either gender (clinical term). Within bisexual communities, many find themselves attracted to multiple gender expressions and gender identities, and actively oppose a binary gender system.
bottom surgery
Surgery “below the waist,” to create either a vagina (for a male-to-female, or MTF), or a penis and testicles (for a female-to-male, or FTM). Factors people consider in deciding whether or not to have bottom surgery include: degree of desire or need, expense, physical health, age, and access to medical care and information. There are risks and complications associated with these surgical procedures, which should be discussed with medical professionals. Such risks and complications are also a factor in individuals’ decision-making regarding these surgeries.
boydyke
A female-bodied person who intentionally or non-intentionally expresses and/or presents culturally/stereotypically masculine, particularly boyish, characteristics. (See also DYKE.) Also, one who enjoys being perceived as a young male (See PASSING).
butch
This term can be used to identify any person who expresses and/or presents culturally/stereotypically masculine characteristics. A person, who self-identifies, mainly with the stereotypically masculine end of a gender characteristic spectrum. Within lesbian, bisexual women’s, and trans communities, a female-bodied person who self-identifies as butch and understands the intricacies of, and exhibits, a masculine spirit. (“Butch” is not, however, a term used by lesbian, bisexual women’s and trans communities exclusively.)
butch queen
A masculine gay man.
C
camp
(also campy)
A culturally specific play on gender, sexuality, and heterosexual norms that occurs within the LGBT community.
coming out
The process of becoming aware of, understanding, and accepting the sexual orientation, gender identity, and/or gender expression of oneself, one’s family member(s), one’s partner(s), or one’s friend(s). Also, the ongoing process of decision-making about the level of openness a person feels in disclosing such information about oneself or one’s family member(s), partner(s), or friend(s) to others. (See also IN THE CLOSET.)
cross-dressing
(also transvestite, transvestitism)
A person who, on occasion, wears the clothing considered typical for another gender, but who does not desire to change their gender. Reasons for cross-dressing can range from a need to express a feminine or masculine side to attainment of erotic/sexual/fetish gratification. Cross-dressers can be of any sexual orientation; the majority of cross-dressers tend to identify as heterosexual/straight. For more information regarding cross-dressing, contact Cross Dressers International (CDI).
cross-living
Cross-dressing full-time (also referred to as 24/7), and living as the gender that one believes oneself to be.
D
drab
Acronym for “Dressed as a Boy.”
drag
(also drag king, drag queen, female & male impersonator)
Wearing the clothing of another gender, often involving the presentation of exaggerated, stereotypical gender characteristics. Individuals may identify as Drag Kings (female in drag) or Drag Queens (male in drag). Drag often refers to dressing for functional purposes such as entertainment/performance or social gatherings. Drag has held a significant place in LGBT history and community. Can also be an acronym for “Dressed as a Girl.”
DSM IV
The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of the American Psychological Association, Fourth Edition. This is the handbook used by mental health professionals. The Fourth Edition is the edition in which the diagnosis “gender dysphoria” first appeared.
dyke
(also femme dyke, butch dyke, bi dyke)
A person who identifies as a woman, and who is emotionally, spiritually, physically, and/or sexually attracted primarily to women. This term is reclaimed or appropriated in a positive way by many types of people for the purpose of self-identification, and can be political. “Dyke” has been historically used in a pejorative way, to ridicule and label lesbians who were/are perceived to express or present stereotypically masculine characteristics.
E
effeminate
A term used to identify a person (usually male) who expresses, and/or presents, culturally/stereotypically feminine characteristics. Often used in a pejorative way, due to sexism.
F
F2M, FTM, female-to-male, female-towards-male
A term used to identify a person who was assigned a female gender at birth or is female-bodied, and who identifies as male, lives as a man, or identifies as masculine. Some use this as an identifier to let others know where on the spectrum they come from and the direction they might be headed. Others in the community use the signifier MTM, male-to-male, to affirm their belief that their assigned gender was inaccurate.
fag (faggot)
A person who identifies as a man, and who is emotionally, spiritually, physically, and/or sexually attracted primarily to men. This term is reclaimed or appropriated in a positive way by many types of people for the purpose of self-identification, and can be political. “Fag” has been historically used in a pejorative way, to ridicule and label gay men who were/are perceived to express or present stereotypically feminine characteristics. This term is becoming more gender neutral; therefore, one does not have to be a man to identify as a fag (i.e., a person who identifies as a “faggy” dyke).
female
A medical label used to signify a “human sex,” the biological designation based on genitalia (a vagina and clitoris). Can also be a socio-political term, used by an individual to label their gender identity.
female bodied
A term used to recognize a person who was assigned a female gender at birth, or who had/has a female body with some variation of genitalia, chromosomes and phenotype as those of a female. Trans or gender variant people who are female-bodied may or may not choose hormonal, surgical and/or other body modification to create a “more male” body. Someone who is female-bodied can never, however, have a male body in the same way as someone born male, with some variation of genitalia, chromosomes and phenotype as those of a male.
feminine
An often ambiguous term that refers to self-expression, performance, actions, behaviors, dress, grooming, adornment and speech popularly associated with someone who is female-bodied within a binary gender system. People of all genders can self-identify as feminine or as having feminine characteristics.
femme
This term can be used to identify any person who expresses and/or presents culturally/stereotypically feminine characteristics. A person, who self-identifies, mainly with the stereotypically feminine end of a gender characteristic spectrum. Within lesbian, bisexual women’s, and trans communities, a person who self-identifies as femme and understands the intricacies of, and exhibits, a feminine spirit. (“Femme” is not, however, a term used by lesbian, bisexual women’s, and trans communities exclusively.)
femme queen
A feminine gay man, who may or may not cross-dress, do drag, or be trans-identified.
full-time
Living 24/7; living all the time as the gender with which one self-identifies.
G
gay
A person (who usually identifies as a man) who is emotionally, spiritually, physically, and/or sexually attracted primarily to members of the same gender. Someone who accepts their same-gender attraction and identifies as gay.
gender
A social construct based on a group of emotional and psychological characteristics that classify an individual as feminine, masculine, androgynous, or other. Gender can be understood to have several components, including GENDER IDENTITY, ASSIGNED GENDER, and GENDER ROLE.
gender (sex) assignment
The process by which doctors determine what one’s gender is, based upon what one’s genitalia appear to be. One is then expected to grow up and exist within a certain set of gender roles “appropriate” to one’s assigned gender. (See also ASSIGNED GENDER.)
gender-bender (also gender-blender, gender fuck)
A person who merges characteristics of any gender in subtle ways or intentionally flaunts blurred stereotypical gender norms for the purpose of shocking others, without concern for passing.
gender dysphoria
An intense, continuous discomfort resulting from an individual’s belief in the inappropriateness of their assigned gender at birth and resulting gender role expectations. Also, a clinical psychological diagnosis, which many in transgender communities are offended by, but is often required in order to receive medical services such as hormones and surgery.
gender expression
Any way in which an individual chooses to present or explain their gender. The self-expression, performance, actions, behavior, dress, grooming, adornment, and speech of individuals according to culturally proscribed norms associated with gender within a binary gender system (i.e., female and male, feminine and masculine). Also refers to self-expression, performance, actions, behavior, dress, grooming, adornment, and speech of individuals in ways which do not conform to gender within a binary gender system, and do not follow culturally proscribed notions of man/male and woman/female or masculine and feminine.
gender identity
The inner sense of being man/male, woman/female, both, neither, butch, femme, two-spirit, multi-gender, bi-gender or another configuration of gender. Gender identity usually matches with one’s physical anatomy, but sometimes does not. Gender identity includes one’s sense of self, the image that one presents to the world, and how one is perceived by the world.
gender oppression
The verbal, physical, and emotional violence and legal discrimination against people who do not conform to socially acceptable gender roles.(genderism is sometimes being used to describe this)
genderqueer
A term which is used by some people who may or may not fit on the spectrum of trans, or be labeled as trans, but who identify their gender and sexual orientation to be outside of the binary gender system, or culturally proscribed gender roles.
gender reassignment surgery - GRS
(also sex reassignment surgery - SRS)
Permanent surgical refashioning of genitalia to resemble the genitalia of the desired gender. Sought to attain congruence between one’s body and one’s gender identity.
gender role
The social expectation of how an individual should act, think and feel, based upon one’s assigned gender. The social expectation that an individual must be defined as man or woman. Gender role includes behavior characterized as feminine or masculine according to culturally prevalent or stereotypic standards.
genetic
A term often used to refer to the gender assigned at birth. Also used to refer to the discussion of the chromosomal makeup of an individual.
getting read
(also clock, to be clocked)
Being detected as a person who is “cross-dressed,” or is not living in their “assigned gender.”
H
heterosexual
An individual who is emotionally, spiritually, physically, and/or sexually attracted primarily to those of the opposite gender (clinical term).
hir
(pronounced “here”) Used in place of “him/her,” a pronoun coined by trans activists to refer to individuals who identify as existing/presenting outside of a binary gender system and its rigid delineations of “male” and “female.”
homophobia
The irrational fear of love, affection, and erotic behavior between people of the same gender. Expressed as negative feelings, attitudes, actions, and institutional discrimination against those perceived as non-heterosexuals. Often directed at those perceived as expressing or presenting stereotypically non-heterosexual characteristics and/or blurred gender roles, regardless of individuals’ actual sexual orientation or gender identity. (See also TRANSPHOBIA)
homosexual
An individual who is emotionally, spiritually, physically, and/or sexually attracted primarily to those of the same gender (clinical term). A term often viewed as negative, overly clinical, or disempowering by many members of LGBT communities.
hormone therapy
(also hormone replacement therapy, hrt, hormonal sex reassignment)
Administration of hormones to affect the development of secondary sex characteristics of the opposite gender than that one was assigned; this is a process, possibly lifelong, of taking hormones to change the internal body chemistry. Female-to-males (FTMs) use androgens such as testosterone, and male-to-females (MTFs) use estrogen and progesterone. Hormone therapy is safest when administered by a medical professional, and after discussion of potential health risks. Some effects of prolonged hormone use are irreversible.
I
identity
How one views, labels, or chooses to identify oneself.
in the closet
Not disclosing (See COMING OUT), or being secretive about, the sexual orientation and/or gender identity of oneself or one’s family member(s), child or children, sibling(s), or friend(s).
internalized homophobia
(also internalized transphobia)
The belief that same-gender sexual orientation and/or transgressive, non-conforming gender identity are inferior to heterosexual orientation and/or traditional masculine or feminine gender identity. The internalization of negative messages, feelings about oneself and one’s group, and beliefs about how one should be treated, which often results in self-hate and difficulty with self-acceptance. Also, an irrational fear of deviating from stereotypical gender roles.
intersex
(also hermaphrodite)
A person born with anatomy or physiology which differs from cultural ideals of male and female. Intersexuals may be born with “ambiguous genitalia,” and/or experience hormone production levels that vary from those of culturally “ideal” female and male. Intersexuals may be born with “full or partial” internal genitalia, and/or “full or partial” external genitalia. Intersexual genitals may “look nearly” female, with a very large clitoris, or they may look “nearly male,” with a very small penis. They may be truly “right in the middle,” with a phallus that can be considered either a large clitoris or a small penis; with a structure that might be a split, empty scrotum, or outer labia; with a small vagina that opens into the urethra rather than into the perineum.
Intersexuals are typically assigned a single gender at birth, and often undergo surgery on their genitals in infancy to force a more culturally acceptable gendered appearance — one which “matches” their assigned gender. Many intersex people who undergo such surgery in infancy later report feeling a sense of loss of an essential aspect of themselves.
Examples of the medical diagnoses used for intersexuals include: adrenal hyperplasia (CAH); ambiguous genitals; androgen insensitivity, full or partial (AIS/PAIS); clitoromegaly; early genital surgery; hypospadias; Klinefelter’s; micropenis; and testicular feminization. For more information regarding intersexuality, contact the Intersex Society of North America (ISNA), via their website www.isna.org
J-K-L
lesbian
A person who identifies as a woman, who is emotionally, spiritually, physically, and/or sexually attracted primarily to members of the same gender. Someone who accepts her same gender attraction and identifies as a lesbian.
M
M2F, MTF, male-to-female, male-towards-female
A term used to identify a person assigned a male gender at birth or is male-bodied, and who identifies as a female, lives as a woman, or identifies as feminine. Some use this as an identifier to let others know where on the spectrum they come from and the direction they might be headed. Others in the community use the signifier FTF, female-to-female, to affirm their belief that their assigned gender was inaccurate.
male
A medical label used to signify a “human sex,” the biological designation based on genitalia (a penis and testicles). Can also be a socio-political term, used by an individual to label their gender identity.
male-bodied
A term used to recognize a person who was assigned a male gender at birth, or who had/has a male body with some variation of genitalia, chromosomes and phenotype as those of a male. Trans or gender variant people who are male-bodied may or may not choose hormonal, surgical, and/or other body modification to create a “more female” body. Someone who is male-bodied can never, however, have a female body in the same way as someone born female, with some variation of genitalia, chromosomes and phenotype as those of a female.
man
A term referring to someone who identifies as such, who may often exhibit masculine or male characteristics (see MASCULINE and MALE). Popularly understood within a binary gender system to refer to someone who is male-bodied.
masculine
An often ambiguous term that refers to self-expression, performance, actions, behaviors, dress, grooming, adornment, and speech popularly associated with someone who is male-bodied within a binary gender system. People of all genders can self-identify as masculine or as having masculine characteristics.
multi-gender
A term used to describe a person who identifies with all genders at some level, and may perform gender in a variety of ways.
N
no-gender
(also non-gender)
A term used to describe a person who identifies as neither of the two genders existing within a binary gender system. A no-gender person may “live outside of” gender, and play with various types of gender or anti-gender expression.
non-op (abbreviated for non-operative)
A term used to describe transgender, transsexual or gender variant individuals who have not attained and may not desire to attain gender reassignment surgery. Such individuals may or may not take hormones. For many individuals, self-identification and self-expression alone (through cross-living or other methods of gender expression) achieve harmony or congruence between one’s body and one’s gender identity. Such individuals may feel no need for surgical reconstruction.
O
oppression
A system of exploitation, and imbalance of power and control, in which one social group benefits over another. Oppressed groups are often made to feel invisible, devalued, disempowered, unimportant, and “abnormal,” and are systematically denied legal rights and economic, political, and cultural access and privilege given to and maintained by groups with greater power within an oppressive system.
P
packing
The act of creating a visual, physical, and tangible form of a penis in one’s pants. This can be done using a variety of techniques and materials, including socks, gel-filled condoms, prosthetic dicks and dildos.
pansexual
(also omnisexual)
A person who is emotionally, spiritually, physically, and/or sexually attracted to those of any gender or physical makeup.
passing
The ability to present oneself as any gender other than that assigned at birth, and be accepted as such.
per
(pronounced “purr”) Abbreviated form of the word “person.” Like HIR, used in place of “him” or “her.” A pronoun coined by trans activists to refer to individuals who identify as existing/presenting outside of a binary gender system and its rigid delineations of “male” and “female.”
post-op (abbreviated for post-operative)
A term used to describe transgender, transsexual, or gender variant individuals who have attained gender reassignment surgery, and/or other surgeries to change secondary sex characteristics.
pre-op (abbreviated for pre-operative)
A term used to describe transgender, transsexual, or gender variant individuals who have not attained gender reassignment surgery, but who desire to and are seeking that as an option. Such individuals may or may not currently be cross-living full time; may or may not undergo hormone therapy; and may or may not be seeking surgery to change secondary sex characteristics, but who may look at this as an option for the future.
presentation
The totality of one’s appearance, including attire, voice, behavior, body language, etc.
primary sex characteristics
Identifiers such as genitalia, body fat distribution, and hair growth patterns that are commonly used to assign or label someone’s gender as male or female within a binary gender system.
Q
queer
Historically and currently used as a slur targeting those perceived to transgress “norms” of sexual orientation and/or gender expression. In the 1980’s and 1990’s, “queer” was increasingly reclaimed and popularized by some LGBT communities as a positive term of self-identification. More recently, this term has been used to identify trans, bisexual, lesbian, intersex, gay, and heterosexual individuals who are progressive sexual and gender outlaws in some way or another.
R
real life test
(also life test)
A period of time required of individuals seeking gender reassignment surgery during which they must live full-time expressing and presenting the gender in which they identify. Many doctors require a Real Life Test of two or more years before advancing to surgery.
S
same gender loving
In the spirit of self-naming, and of ethnic/ sexual pride, the term “same-gender-loving” (SGL) was introduced to fortify the lives and illuminate the voices of black and African-American homosexual and bisexual people of color; to provide a powerful identity not marginalized by “racism” in the gay community or “homophobic” attitudes in society. Adapted from the following website - www.samegenderloving.net
secondary sex characteristics
Physical characteristics that emerge with the onset of puberty, including but not limited to: facial and body hair growth, muscle development, voice changes, breast development, and the ability to reproduce.
self-defined gender
A gender identity that one chooses for oneself without regard for limitations imposed by social norms or a binary gender system. May or may not be fixed, may evolve and change. Often determined as a result of an individual’s questioning and exploring gender issues, examination of gender roles, and through a process of self-discovery.
sex
1. A term used historically and within the medical field to identify genetic/biological/hormonal/physical characteristics, including genitalia, which are used to classify an individual as female, male, or intersex. 2. (Also SEXUALITY, SEXUAL BEHAVIOR) Activity engaged in by oneself, with another or others to express attractions and/or arousal.
sexual orientation
A continuum of affectional, erotic, fantasy, or sexual arousal toward an individual of the same gender, the opposite gender, or other genders. Terms used to identify sexual orientation include: gay, lesbian, bisexual, pansexual, transsensual, straight, heterosexual, homosexual, same gender loving, two-sprit, dyke, fag, queer, women who have sex with women, men who have sex with men, and asexual. People experience sexuality in three ways: sexual orientation, or how one experiences attractions; behavior, or how one acts based upon such attractions; and self-identification, or how one chooses to define or identify oneself.
shapeshifter
(also metamorph)
A term used by some people (who choose not to identify as transsexuals) to express their belief they are not changing their gender, but changing their body to reflect their inner feelings and gender identity.
standards of care
A set of minimum guidelines formulated by the Harry Benjamin International Gender Dysphoria Association, Inc. (HBIGDA) for care of transsexual individuals. Provides requirements for consumers and service providers. For a copy of the standards of care, contact HBIGDA via their website - www.hbigda.org
straight
(also heterosexual, HET)
A term used to describe a person who is emotionally, spiritually, physically, and/or sexually attracted primarily to members of the opposite gender. A person who accepts their opposite gender attraction and who identifies as straight or het.
T
third gender
A term used to describe people who feel they are other than male or female, or a combination of both.
top surgery
Surgery “above the waist,” usually breast augmentation for MTFs and breast reduction for FTMs. Factors people consider in deciding whether or not to have bottom surgery include: degree of desire or need, expense, physical health, age, and access to medical care and information. There are risks and complications associated with these surgical procedures, which should be discussed with medical professionals. Such risks and complications are also a factor in individuals’ decision-making regarding these surgeries.

trans
(also transgender)

A term used to describe those who transgress social gender norms; often used as an umbrella term to mean those who defy rigid, binary gender constructions, and who express or present a breaking and/or blurring of culturally prevalent/stereotypical gender roles. The term trans includes but is not limited to transsexuals, intersex individuals, bi-genders, no-genders, androgynes, cross-dressers, gender-benders, feminine men, masculine women, shape shifters, transvestites, and sometimes Two-Spirit people. Transfolk, transperson, transpeople and trannies are other more casual terms used to refer to people who identify as trans or gender variant.
trans community
(also transgender/gender communities)
A loose association of individuals and organizations who transgress gender norms in a variety of ways and perform advocacy and education on trans issues and trans liberation. Celebrating a recently born self-awareness, this community is growing fast across all lines. The central ethic of this community is unconditional acceptance of individual exercise of freedoms around gender, sexual identity and orientation.
transgenderist
An individual who chooses to cross-live full time, but who chooses not to have SRS/GRS. Such individuals may or may not take hormones. For many individuals, self-identification and self-expression alone (through cross-living or other methods of gender expression) achieve harmony or congruence between one’s body and one’s gender identity. Such individuals may thus feel no need for surgical reconstruction.
transition
The period during which a trans person (usually transsexual) begins to live a new life as their true gender. Can include the period of full-time living (see REAL LIFE TEST) required before gender reassignment surgery. After transitioning and surgery some transexuals who are living full-time identify only as a man or as a woman.
transphobia
(also genderphobia)
The irrational fear of those who are perceived to break or blur stereotypical gender roles. Expressed as negative feelings, attitudes, actions, and institutional discrimination. Often directed at those perceived as expressing or presenting their gender in a transgressive way, defying stereotypical gender norms, or who are perceived to exhibit non-heterosexual characteristics — regardless of individuals’ actual gender identity or sexual orientation. (See also HOMOPHOBIA.)
transsensual
An individual who is emotionally, spiritually, physically, and/or sexually attracted to those of any trans-identified genders or a specific trans-identified gender.
transsexual
An individual who experiences intense, persistent, long-term discomfort with their body and self-image due to the belief that their assigned gender is inappropriate. This individual may then takes steps to adapt or change their body, gender role and gender expression in order to achieve congruence with their gender identity, (what they believe their true gender to be). Such steps may include cross-living, hormone use, surgery, and/or other body modification. Taking such steps may or may not lead to a feeling of harmony or congruence between a person’s body and gender identity. After transitioning and surgery some transexuals who are living full-time identify only as a man or a woman. (See also F2M/FTM/FEMALE-TO-MALE, M2F/MTF/MALE-TO-FEMALE, PRE-OPERATIVE, POST-OPERATIVE, NON-OPERATIVE)
tuck
The technique of hiding male genitals.
two-spirit
A term used by some indigenous/First Nation/Native American people to describe the experience of being, in Euro-American-centric terms, lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender. For a lengthier discussion on the use of this term, refer to Gary Bowen’s article, “Transgendered Native Americans” (1996), available through The American Boyz (contact information via their website at: http://www.amboyz.org/articles/native.html
U-V-W
woman
A term referring to someone who identifies as such, who may often exhibit feminine or female characteristics (see FEMININE and FEMALE). Popularly understood within a binary gender system to refer to someone who is female-bodied.
X-Y-Z
ze
(pronounced “sea”) Used in place of “she/he,” a pronoun coined by trans activists to refer to individuals who identify as existing/presenting outside of a binary gender system and its rigid delineations of “male” and “female.” (See also ADDITIONAL PRONOUNS.)