WEATHER PAGES

FORECASTS

MET
OFFICE

SHIPPING
FORECAST

EUROPEAN
WEATHER ALERTS

TROPICAL STORM &
HURRICANE ALERTS


Barometric
Pressure

Cloud
Types

Fog

Fronts

Humidity

Hurricanes

Hurricane
Names

Precipitation

Sun
Index

Tornadoes

Wind
Speeds


CLOUD TYPES.

The main cloud types are classified using Latin names :

Cumulus = heaped
Stratus = layer
Cirrus = Curl of Hair
Nimbus = rain

These names are basically a description of the cloud as viewed from the ground.

Prefixes are then used to decribe the altitude of the cloud base, for instance :

"cirr-" are high level
"alto-" are middle level
"strat-" are low level

Cloud TypesCloud GroupAtmospheric LayerCloud Base
noctilucent clouds (NLC's)Polar Mesospheric Clouds (PMC's) Mesosphere
about 85,300m
Polar Stratospheric Clouds (PSC's)Stratosphere
19,312m - 28,968m
Cumulus clouds are puffy white or light grey and resmble floating cotton balls with sharp outlines and flat bases. Clouds with Vertical Growth span all levels of the troposphere and may reach into the stratosphere. They develop due to warm air rising from the surface.
Troposphere
and
Stratosphere
12000m
Cumulus humilis clouds are associated with fair weather.
Cumulus congestus clouds have tops that resemble cauliflower heads are usually associated with light to heavy showers.
Cumulonimbus can grow up to 10km high, where high winds flatten the tops to give an anvil type appearance. It is these that are responsible for heavy rain, snow, hail, lightning, and tornadoes.
Cirrus clouds are composed entirely of ice. They are usually white and commonly referred to as "Mare's Tails" as they consist of long, thin, wispy streamers. They are a predictor of fair weather. The high clouds are all made of ice crystals due to the cold air in the upper sky.
Troposphere
and
Stratosphere
tropics: 6000-18000m

mid-latitudes: 5000-13000m

polar region: 3000-8000m

Cirrostratus are thin sheet like clouds that typically cover the entire sky. They are normaly responsible for the halo that can be observed around the sun or moon. When middle altitude clouds are seen with Cirrostratus it can be considsered as a predictor of precipitation.
Cirrocumulus clouds are small rounded, typically white, puffs that usually appear in long rows. They are seen in the winter and indicate fair, but cold weather.
Altostratus cloud are grey to bluish grey usually covering the whole sky. The Sun or Moon can shine through these but will appear out of focus. An altostratus cloud usually forms ahead of storms with continuous rain or snow. Occasionally, rain will fall from an altostratus cloud. Middle Clouds are a combination of ice crystals and water droplets. Troposphere
2000 - tropics:
8000m

mid-latitudes:
7000m

polar region:
4000m

Altocumulus clouds usually form in greyish-white groups about 1 km thick.
Stratus are uniform grey in colour and almost cover the entire sky, usually looking like a fog that doesn't reach the ground. Light mist or drizzle is sometimes associated. The low clouds consist of water droplets.
Troposphere
surface-2000m
Stratocumulus clouds are low, lumpy, and greyand normally form in rows with blue sky visible in between.
Nimbostratus are dark grey with a ragged base and associated with continuous light rain or snow.


Types of Fog

Advection occurs when moist air passes over a cool surface by wind and is cooled.
Artificial usually created by vaporizing a water and glycol-based or glycerine-based fluid
Freezing occurs when liquid fog droplets freeze to surfaces, forming white rime ice
Garua a transparent mist which is nearly invisible.
Ground is fog that obscures less than 60% of the sky and does not extend to the base of any overhead clouds.
Hail a localised ground fog caused melting and evaporating of hail when there is a warm, humid layer atop the hail and there is light wind.
Ice where the droplets have frozen into extremely tiny crystals of ice in midair.
Precipitation / frontal forms as precipitation falls into drier air below the cloud, the liquid droplets evaporating into water vapor.
Radiation formed by the cooling of land after sunset by thermal radiation in calm conditions with clear sky.
Steam / evaporation the most localized form and is created by cold air passing over much warmer water or moist land.
Upslope forms when winds blow air up a slope causing the moisture in it to condense.
Valley /Tule the result of a temperature inversion caused by heavier cold air settling into in a valley, with warmer air passing over the mountains above.



FRONTS

Cold Fronts occur when heavy cold air displaces lighter warm air, pushing it upward. Cumulus clouds form and usually grow into thunderstorms.
Temperatures drop anywhere from 5 degrees to 15. Winds become gusty and erratic. Rain, snow, sleet, and hail can occur with a cold front.

Occluded Fronts occur when cold air is replacing cool air or vice versa at the surface, with warm air above.
A cold occlusion occurs when cold air shoves its way under cool air at the surface.
Warm air aloft is usually to the west of the surface front.
A warm occlusion occurs when cool air rises over cold air.
The warm-cold air boundary is often east of the surface front.
Both types of fronts are usually associated with rain or snow and cumulus clouds.
Temperature fluctuations are small and winds are gentle.

Stationary Fronts occur when neither warm nor cold air advances.
The two air masses reach a stalemate.
These type of conditions can last for days, producing nothing but Altocumulus clouds.
Temperatures remain stagnant and winds are gentle to nil.

Warm Fronts occur when warm air replaces cold air by sliding over it.
Altocumulus clouds form and may be associated with rain, snow, or sleet.
Temperatures may warm slightly.
Winds are usually gentle with this kind of front.


Precipitation is the term used to refer to atmospheric water vapor that is deposited on the earth's surface. This occurs when the atmosphere becomes saturated due to cooling or he adding of moisture.

Cooling can de due to :

Lift

Conductive cooling

Radiational cooling

Evaporative cooling

Saturation can be due to :

Precipitation falling from above

Daytime heating evaporating water from the surface of oceans/lakes

Drier air moving over open water

Types of Precipitation

Dry

Virga evaporates before reaching the ground

Liquid

Drizzleliquid water drops smaller than 0.5 mm (0.02 in.) in diameter
Rain
Very light < 0.25 mm/hour
Light > 0.25 < 1.0 mm/hour
Moderate > 1.0 < 4.0 mm/hour
Heavy > 4.0 r < 16.0 mm/hour
Very heavy > 16.0 < 50 mm/hour
Extreme > 50.0 mm/hour

Freezing

Freezing drizzlefreezes on contact with the ground or an object at or near the surface.
Freezing rain supercooled droplets that will freeze upon impact with any object it encounters

Frozen

Graupel / Snow pellets supercooled droplets of water condense on a snowflake to form a 2–5 mm ball of ice
Hail balls or irregular lumps of ice mostly of water ice and measuring between 5 and 50 millimeters in diameter
Ice crystals (Diamond dust) a ground-level cloud composed of tiny ice crystals
Ice pellets (sleet) small, translucent ice balls
Snow crystalline water ice, consisting of a multitude of snowflakes
Snow grains very small amounts of >1 mm, white, opaque grains of flat or enlongated ice


HUMIDITY

Relative humidity refers to the amount of water that is in the air compared to the amount of water that the air is capable of holding.

For instance, at 20o C, one litre of air can hold 17mg of water so if there is 1.7 mg of water in the air then there is a relative humidity of 10%.

The graph below shows the amount of water that can be held in the air for a range of temperatures.

The table below shows the apparent temperatures due to humidity levels.

RELATIVE HUMIDITY %
0 51015202530354045 50556065707580859095100
Actual
temp
APPARENT TEMPERATURE
43o C3739 4142 4447 5154 5862 66
41o C3536 3839 4143 4548 5154 5761 65
38o C3334 3536 3738 4042 4346 4952 5659 62
35o C313132 3334 3436 3738 4042 4346 4851 5458
32o C282929303131 3233 343536 3738394143454750
29o C2626272728282929303131 323233 34 35 36 37 39 41 42
27o C 232324242525262626 2727 2728 2829 3030 3131 3233
24o C2121 212222 222323232324 242424252526262626 27
21o C1818 181819 191919 2020 212121 212122 222222 2222


SUN INDEX

The SUN INDEX that they talk about on weather forecasts is basically a guide to the potential danger of exposure to direct sunlight.

SUN INDEX PALE SKIN
EASILY BURNT
PALE SKIN
NOT EASILY BURNT
BROWN SKIN BLACK SKIN
1TD>LOWLOWLOWLOW
2 LOW LOW LOW LOW
3 MEDIUM LOW LOW LOW
4 MEDIUM LOW LOW LOW
5 HIGH MEDIUM LOW LOW
6 HIGH MEDIUM MEDIUM LOW
7 VERY HIGH HIGH MEDIUM MEDIUM
8 VERY HIGH HIGH MEDIUM MEDIUM
9 VERY HIGH HIGH MEDIUM MEDIUM
10 VERY HIGH HIGH HIGH MEDIUM

LOW

You should not worry about exposure to sunlight.

MEDIUM

While the Sun is not particularly dangerous you should avoid prolonged exposure to direct Sunlight.

HIGH

It is advisable to stay out of direct sunlight as burning may occur between 30 minutes and an hour.

Keep covered up and use at least SPF 15.

VERY HIGH

Less than half an hour can result in severe burning in direct sunlight.


WIND SPEEDS

Beaufort Scale.

The most commonly used scale for windspeed today is the "Beaufort Scale"although others, including Defoe’s Table of Degrees and a quantitative wind scale devised by a Mr Rous at the beginning of the 19th century have also been included here.

In 1805 Francis Beaufort devised a scale that he first mentioned in his private log on 13th January 1806 whilst he was serving on board HMS Woolwich. He stated in the log that he would "hereafter estimate the force of the wind according to the following scale"

Category Description
0 Calm
1 Faint air just not calm
2 Light airs
3 Light breeze
4 Gentle breeze
5 Moderate breeze
6 Fresh breeze
7 Gentle steady gale
8 Moderate gale
9 Brisk gale
10 Fresh gale
11 Hard gale
12 Hard gale with heavy gusts
13 Storm

In 1807 he combined categories 1 and 2 to produce a scale extending from 0 to 12. This was later adopted by the Admiralty:

Admiralty Memorandum.

A Memorandum issued by the Admiralty in December 1838 to "all Captains and Commanding Officers of Her Majesty's Ships and Vessels" led to Beauforts 1832 Scale being adopted. The memorandum read :
Admiralty, Dec 28th, 1838
M E M O R A N D U M.
THE Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty having had under consideration the general utility of recording with clearness and precision, in the Log Books of all Her Majesty's Ships and Vessels of War, the actual State of the Winds and Weather, have thought fit to order that henceforward in each page of the Log Book two columns should be introduced, wherein the force of the Wind and the appearance of the Atmosphere shall be every hour registered according to the annexed scheme, a copy of which shall be pasted into each book and painted on the back of every Log Board or Log Slate and two more columns shall likewise be given for the purpose of entering the heights of the Barometer or Sympiesometer, and Thermometer, when such instruments may be on board.
By Command of their Lordships,
C. W O O D

and the scale adopted was :

Beaufort
Number
General Description
Beaufort's Criterion
0 Calm
Calm
1Light Air
Just sufficient to give steerage way
2 Light Breeze
With which a well-conditioned man of war, under all sail, and ‘clean full’, would go in smooth water from
1 to 2 knots
3 Gentle Breeze 3 to 4 knots
4 Moderate Breeze 5 to 6 knots
5 Fresh Breeze
In which the same ship could just carry close hauled... royals etc.
6 Strong Breeze single-reefs and top-gallant sails
7 Moderate Gale double-reefs, jib, etc
8 Fresh Gale triple-reefs, courses, etc
9 Strong Gale close-reefs and courses
10 Whole Gale
With which she could only bear close-reefed maintop–sail and reefed fore-sail
11 Storm
With which she would be reduced to storm staysails
12 Hurricane
To which she could show no canvas


Modern Beaufort Scale

Beaufort
number
Knots
Miles per hour
metres per second
description of wind
-meanlimits meanlimitsmeanlimits-
00>10> 10.0 0.0 - 0.2 calm
121 - 321 - 30.8 0.3 - 1.5light air
254 - 654 - 7 2.4 1.6 - 3.3light breeze
397 - 10108 - 124.33.4 - 5.4 gentle breeze
41311 - 161513 - 18 6.7 5.5 - 7.9moderate breeze
51917 - 212119 - 24 9.3 8.0 - 10.7 fresh breeze
62422 - 272825 - 3112.310.8 - 13.9strong breeze
73028 - 333532 - 3815.5 13.9 - 17.1 near gale
8 37 34 - 404239 - 4618.917.2 - 20.7gale
94441 - 475047 - 5422.620.8 - 24.4strong gale
105248 - 55 5955 - 6326.424.5 - 28.4storm
11 60 56 - 636864 - 7230.528.5 - 32.6violent storm
12---> 64--->73--->32.7hurricane

The Beaufort scale can also be judged visually using the following guide.

0
LandCalm; smoke rises vertically.
SeaSea like a mirror.
1
LandDirection of wind shown by smoke drift but not by wind vanes.
SeaRipples with the appearance of scales are formed but without foam crests.
2
LandWind felt on face; leaves rustle; ordinary vanes moved by wind. .
SeaSmall wavelets, still short but more pronounced; crests have a glassy appearance and do not break.
3
LandLeaves and small flags in constant motion; winds extend light flags.
SeaLarge wavelets; crests begin to break; foam of glassy appearance; perhaps scattered white horses.
4
LandDust and loose paper raised; small branches are moved.
SeaSmall waves, becoming longer, fairly frequent white horses.
5
LandSmall trees in leaf begin to sway; crested wavelets form on inland waters.
SeaModerate waves, taking a more pronounced long form; many white horses are formed; chance of some spray. .
6
LandLarge branches in motion, umbrellas used with difficulty.
SeaLarge waves begin to form; the white foam crests are more extensive everywhere; probably some spray.
7
LandWhole trees in motion; inconvenience felt when walking against the wind.
SeaSea heaps up and white foam from breaking waves begins to be blown in streaks along the direction of the wind.
8
LandTwigs broken off trees; progress generally impeded.
SeaModerately high waves of greater length, edges of crests begin to break into spindrift; the foam is blown in well marked streaks along the direction of the wind.
9
LandSlight structural damage occurs (chimney pots and slates removed).
SeaHigh waves, dense streaks of foam along the direction of the wind; crests of waves begin to topple, tumble and roll over, spray may affect visibility.
10
LandSeldom experienced inland; trees uprooted; considerable structural damage occurs.
SeaVery high waves with long overhanging crests, the resulting foam in great patches, is blown in dense white streaks along the direction of the wind; on the whole, the surface of the sea takes on a white appearance; the tumbling of the sea becomes heavy and shock-like; visibility affected.
11
LandVery rarely experienced; accompanied by widespread damage. .
SeaExceptionally high waves (small and medium sized ships may be lost to view behind the waves for varying periods of time); the sea is completely covered with long white patches of foam lying along the direction of the wind; everywhere the edges of the wave crests are blown into froth; visibility is affected.
12
Land ----
SeaThe air is filled with foam and spray; sea completely white with driving spray, visibility very seriously affected.


Defoe's Table of Degrees.

The first recorded table of wind speeds was devised by Daniel Defoe who used a 12 point scale which he referred to as "a table of degrees". He basically used "bald terms used by our sailors" to describe the storm that hit Britain on 26-27 November 1703.
         *     Stark calm
         *     Calm weather
         *     Little wind
         *     A fine breeze
         *     A small gale
         *     A fresh gale
         *     A topsail gale
         *     Blows fresh
         *     A hard gale of wind
         *     A fret of wind
         *     A storm
         *     A tempest


First Quantitative Wind Scale.

The first quantitative wind scale was devised at the beginning of the 19th century and was constructed by a Mr Rous who used a considerable number of facts and experiments to produce the following :

Terms of the wind
Velocity of wind
Perpendicular force on one sqaure foot in Avoirdupois pounds
Miles in one hour Feet in one second
Almost calm 1 1.47 0.005
Just perceptible 2
3
2.93
4.40
0.020
0.044
Gentle breeze 4
5
5.87
7.33
0.079
0.123
Fresh breeze 10
15
14.64
22.00
0.492
1.107
Fresh gale 20
25
29.34
36.67
1.968
3.075
Strong gale 30
35
44.01
51.34
4.429
6.027
Hard gale 40
45
56.68
66.01
7.873
9.963
Storm 50 75.35 12.300
Violent hurricanes, tempests, etc. 60
80
100
88.02
117.36
146.70
17.715
31.490
49.200


HURRICANES

Lists of the worlds Hurricane Names can be found at the bottom of the page.

Category 1

Central Pressure

mbar 980

Storm Surge

feet 4–5
in Hg 28.94 metres 1.2–1.5

Sustained winds

mph74–95km/h119–153
knots64–82 m/s33–42
* No significant damage to building structures.
* May tip over unanchored mobile homes, as well as uproot or snap trees.
* Poorly attached roof shingles or tiles can blow off.
* Some coastal flooding and possible minor pier damage.

Category 2

Central Pressure

mbar 965 – 979

Storm Surge

feet 6–8
in Hg 28.50–28.91 metres 1.8–2.4

Sustained winds

mph96–110km/h154–177
knots83–95 m/s43–49
* Damage to some roofing material, and to poorly constructed doors and windows.
* Considerable damage to vegetation, poorly constructed signs, and piers.
* Mobile homes usually badly damaged, many manufactured homes suffer structural damage.
* Small craft in unprotected anchorages may break their moorings

Category 3

Central Pressure

mbar945 – 964

Storm Surge

feet9–12
in Hg 27.91–28.47 metres 2.7–3.7

Sustained winds

mph111–130km/h 178–209
knots96–113 m/s 50–58
* Some structural damage to small residences and utility buildings.
* Buildings that lack a solid foundation usually destroyed, and gable-end roofs are peeled off.
* Manufactured homes sustain very heavy and irreparable damage.
* Flooding near the coast destroys smaller structures.

Category 4

Central Pressure

mbar921 – 944

Storm Surge

feet13–18
in Hg 27.17–27.88metres 4.0–5.5

Sustained winds

mph131–155km/h210–249
knots 114–135m/s 59–69
* Extensive curtainwall failures, with some complete roof structural failure on small residences.
* Heavy, irreparable damage and near complete destruction of gas station canopies and other wide span overhang type structures are also common.
* Mobile and manufactured homes are leveled.
* Major erosion of beach areas and inland flooding.
* Extremely danger to populated areas.

Category 5

Central Pressure

mbar < 920

Storm Surge

feet > 19
in Hg < 27.17 metres > 5.5

Sustained winds

mph > 156km/h > 250
knots > 136 m/s > 70
* Complete roof failure on many residences and industrial buildings.
* Some complete building failures with small utility buildings blown over or away.
* Collapse of many wide-span roofs and walls.
* Very heavy and irreparable damage to many wood frame structures.
* Total destruction to many mobile/manufactured homes.
* Only a few types of structures are capable of surviving intact.
* Flooding causes major damage to the lower floors of all structures near the shoreline, and many coastal structures can be completely flattened or washed away by the storm surge.
* Storm surge damage can occur up to four city blocks inland, with flooding, depending on terrain, reaching six to seven blocks inland.


TORNANDOES

Fujita Scale

(Fujita-Pearson Scale) is used to rate tornado intensity.
It is based on the damage that the tornado inflicts.

The scale was developed in 1971 by Tetsuya "Ted" Fujita (University of Chicago) and Allen Pearson (head of the National Severe Storms Forecast Center).

F-Scale
Number
Intensity
Phrase
Wind
Speed
Type of Damage Done
F0Gale
tornado
40-72 mphSome damage to chimneys; breaks branches off trees; pushes over shallow-rooted trees; damages sign boards.
F1Moderate
tornado
73-112 mphThe lower limit is the beginning of hurricane wind speed; peels surface off roofs; mobile homes pushed off foundations or overturned; moving autos pushed off the roads; attached garages may be destroyed.
F2Significant
tornado
113-157 mphConsiderable damage. Roofs torn off frame houses; mobile homes demolished; boxcars pushed over; large trees snapped or uprooted; light object missiles generated.
F3Severe
tornado
158-206 mphRoof and some walls torn off well constructed houses; trains overturned; most trees in fores uprooted
F4Devastating
tornado
207-260 mphWell-constructed houses leveled; structures with weak foundations blown off some distance; cars thrown and large missiles generated.
F5Incredible
tornado
261-318 mphStrong frame houses lifted off foundations and carried considerable distances to disintegrate; automobile sized missiles fly through the air in excess of 100 meters; trees debarked; steel re-inforced concrete structures badly damaged.
F6Inconceivable
tornado
319-379 mphThese winds are very unlikely. The small area of damage they might produce would probably not be recognizable along with the mess produced by F4 and F5 wind that would surround the F6 winds. Missiles, such as cars and refrigerators would do serious secondary damage that could not be directly identified as F6 damage. If this level is ever achieved, evidence for it might only be found in some manner of ground swirl pattern, for it may never be identifiable through engineering studies


The link below will enable you to download and interactive weather station.

You can use it to find out what the local weather is doing almost anywhere in the world.


Weather Exchange.


Hurricane
Names

Atlantic Hurricanes

Retired Atlantic Names

East North Pacific

Central North Pacific

Western North Pacific

Western Australian Region

Northern Australian Region

Eastern Australian Region

Fiji Region

Philippine Region

Northern Indian Ocean

Southwest Indian Ocean


Atlantic Hurricane Names

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

Arthur Ana Alex Arlene Alberto Andrea
Bertha Bill Bonnie Bret Beryl Barry
Cristobal Claudette Colin Cindy Chris Chantal
Dolly Danny Danielle Don Debby Dean
Edouard Erika Earl Emily Ernesto Erin
Fay Fred Fiona Franklin Florence Felix
Gustav Grace Gaston Gert Gordon Gabrielle
Hanna Henri Hermine Harvey Helene Humberto
Ike Ida Igor Irene Isaac Ingrid
Josephine Joaquin Julia Jose Joyce Jerry
Kyle Kate Karl Katia Kirk Karen
Laura Larry Lisa Lee Leslie Lorenzo
Marco Mindy Matthew Maria Michael Melissa
Nana Nicholas Nicole Nate Nadine Noel
Omar Odette Otto Ophelia Oscar Olga
Paloma Peter Paula Philippe Patty Pablo
Rene Rose Richard Rina Rafael Rebekah
Sally Sam Shary Sean Sandy Sebastien
Teddy Teresa Tomas Tammy Tony Tanya
Vicky Victor Virginie Vince Valerie Van
Wilfred Wanda Walter Whitney William Wendy

Retired Atlantic Names (by year)

1954 CarolHazel
1955 ConnieDianeIoneJanet
1957 Audrey
1960 Donna
1961 CarlaHattie
1963 Flora
1964 CleoDoraHilda
1965 Betsy
1966 Inez
1967 Beulah
1968 Edna
1969 Camille
1970 Celia
1972 Agnes
1974 CarmenFifi
1975 Eloise
1977 Anita
1979 DavidFrederic
1980 Allen
1983 Alicia
1985 ElenaGloria
1988 GilbertJoan
1989 Hugo
1990 DianaKlaus
1991 Bob
1992 Andrew
1995 LuisMarilynOpalRoxanne
1996 CesarFranHortense
1998 GeorgesMitch
1999 FloydLenny
2000 Keith
2001 AllisonIrisMichelle
2002 IsidoreLili
2003 FabianIsabelJuan
2004 CharleyFrancesIvanJeanne
2005 DennisKatrinaRitaStanWilma


East North Pacific

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

Alma Andres Agatha Adrian Aletta Alvin
Boris Blanca Blas Beatriz Bud Barbara
Cristina Carlos Celia Calvin Carlotta Cosme
Douglas Dolores Darby Dora Daniel Dalila
Elida Enrique Estelle Eugene Emilia Erick
Fausto Felicia Frank Fernanda Fabio Flossie
Genevieve Guillermo Georgette Greg Gilma Gil
Hernan Hilda Howard Hilary Hector Henriette
Iselle Ignacio Isis Irwin Ileana Ivo
Julio Jimena Javier Jova John Juliette
Karina Kevin Kay Kenneth Kristy Kiko
Lowell Linda Lester Lidia Lane Lorena
Marie Marty Madeline Max Miriam Manuel
Norbert Nora Newton Norma Norman Narda
Odile Olaf Orlene Otis Olivia Octave
Polo Patricia Paine Pilar Paul Priscilla
Rachel Rick Roslyn Ramon Rosa Raymond
Simon Sandra Seymour Selma Sergio Sonia
Trudy Terry Tina Todd Tara Tico
Vance Vivian Virgil Veronica Vicente Velma
Winnie Waldo Winifred Wiley Willa Wallis
Xavier Xina Xavier Xina Xavier Xina
Yolanda York Yolanda York Yolanda York
Zeke Zelda Zeke Zelda Zeke Zelda


Central North Pacific

List 1

List 2

List 3

List 4

Akoni Aka Alika Ana
Ema Ekeka Ele Ela
Hana Hali Huko Halola
Io Iolana Ioke Iune
Keli Keoni Kika Kimo
Lala Li Lana Loke
Moke Mele Maka Malia
Nele Nona Neki Niala
Oka Oliwa Oleka Oko
Peke Paka Peni Pali
Uleki Upana Ulia Ulika
Wila Wene Wali Walaka

The names are used sequentially so that as the bottom of one list is reached, the next name is the top of the next list.


Western North Pacific

Contributor I II III IV V
Cambodia Damrey Kong-rey Nakri Krovanh Sarika
China Haikui Yutu Fengshen Dujuan Haima
DPR Korea Kirogi Toraji Kalmaegi Mujigae Meari
HK, China Kai-Tak Man-yi Fung-wong Choi-wan Ma-on
Japan Tembin Usagi Kanmuri Koppu Tokage
Lao PDR Bolaven Pabuk Phanfone Ketsana Nock-ten
Macau Sanba Wutip Vongfong Parma Muifa
Malaysia Jelawat Sepat Nuri Melor Merbok
Micronesia Ewiniar Fitow Sinlaku Nepartak Nanmadol
Philippines Malaksi Danas Hagupit Lupit Talas
RO Korea Gaemi Nari Jangmi Mirinae Noru
Thailand Prapiroon Wipha Mekkhala Nida Kulap
U.S.A. Maria Francisco Higos Omais Roke
Vietnam Son-Tinh Lekima Bavi Conson Sonca
Cambodia Bopha Krosa Maysak Chanthu Nesat
China Wukong Haiyan Haishen Dianmu Haitang
DPR Korea Sonamu Podul Noul Mindulle Nalgae
HK, China Shanshan Lingling Dolphin Lionrock Banyan
Japan Yagi Kaziki Kujira Kompasu Washi
Lao PDR Leepi Faxai Chan-hom Namtheun Pakhar
Macau Bebinca Peipah Linfa Malou Sanvu
Malaysia Rumbia Tapah Nangka Meranti Mawar
Micronesia Soulik Mitag Soudelor Fanapi Guchol
Philippines Cimaron Hagibis Molave Malakas Talim
RO Korea Jebi Neoguri Goni Megi Doksuri
Thailand Mangkhut Rammasun Morakot Chaba Khanun
U.S.A. Utor Matmo Etau Aere Vicente
Vietnam Trami Halong Vamco Songda Saola

These names are also used sequentially.


Australian Region Names

Western Australian Region

Adeline Alison Alex
Bertie Billy Bessi
Clare Cathy Clancy
Daryl Damien Dianne
Emma Ellie Errol
Floyd Frederic Fiona
Glenda Gabrielle Grant
Hubert Hamish Harriet
Isobel Ilsa Iggy
Jacob John Jana
Kara Kirrily Ken
Lee Leon Linda
Melanie Marcia Mitchell
Nicholas Norman Nicky
Ophelia Olga Oscar
Pancho Paul Phoebe
Rosie Robyn Raymond
Selwyn Sean Sally
Tiffany Terri Tim
Victor Vincent Vivienne
Zelia Yvette Willy

Northern Australian Region

Amelia Alistair
Bruno Bonnie
Coral Craig
Dominic Debbie
Esther Evan
Ferdinand Farrah
Gretel George
Hector Helen
Irma Ira
Jake Jasmine
Kay Kim
Laurence Laura
Marian Matt
Neville Narelle
Olwyn Oswald
Phil Penny
Raqual Russell
Samuel Sandra
Tasha Trevor
Verdun Valerie
Winsome Warwick

Eastern Australian Region

Alfred Ann Anika
Blanch Bruce Bernie
Caleb Cecily Claudia
Denise Dennis Des
Ernie Edna Erin
Frances Fletcher Fritz
Greg Gillian Grace
Hilda Harold Harvey
Ivan Ita Ingrid
Joyce Jack Jim
Kelvin Kitty Kate
Liz Les Larry
Marcus May Monica
Nora Nathan Nelson
Owen Olinda Odette
Polly Pete Pierre
Richard Ruby Rebecca
Sadie Stan Sheryl
Theo Tammie Tania
Verity Vaughan Vernon
Wallace Wylva Wendy

Each region uses these lists sequentially so, for instance, if the last storm of the year is Richard, the first storm of the next year is Sadie.


Fiji Region

LIST A LIST B LIST C LIST D LIST E
(Standby)
Ami Arthur Atu Alan Amos
Beni Becky Bobby Bart Bune
Cilla Cliff Cyril Cora Chris
Dovi Daman Drena Dani Daphne
Eseta Elisa Evan Ella Eva
Fili Funa Freda Frank Fanny
Gina Gene Gavin Gita Garry
Heta Hettie Helene Hali Hagar
Ivy Innis Ian Iris Irene
Judy Joni June Jo Julie
Kerry Ken Keli Kim Koko
Lola Lin Lusi Leo Louise
Meena Mick Martin Mona Mike
Nancy Nisha Nute Neil Nat
Olaf Oli Osea Oma Odile
Percy Pat Pam Paula Pami
Rae Rene Ron Rita Reuben
Sheila Sarah Susan Sam Solo
Tam Tomas Tui Trina Tuni
Urmil Usha Ursula Uka Ula
Vaianu Vania Veli Vicky Victor
Wati Wilma Wes Walter Winston
Zita Yasi Yali Yolande Yalo
Zaka Zuman Zoe Zena

The lists are used sequentially one after the other. The first name in any given year is the one immediately following the last name from the previous year. List E is a list of replacement names if they become necessary.


Philippine Region

2008 2009 2010 2011
Ambo Auring Agaton Amang
Butchoy Bising Basyang Bebeng
Cosme Crising Caloy Chedeng
Dindo Dante Domeng Dodong
Enteng Emong Ester Egay
Frank Feria Florita Falcon
Gener Gorio Gloria Goring
Helen Huaning Henry Hanna
Igme Isang Inday Ineng
Julian Jolina Juan Juaning
Karen Kiko Katring Kabayan
Lawin Labuyo Luis Lando
Marce Maring Milenyo Mina
Nina Nando Neneng Nonoy
Ofel Ondoy Ompong Onyok
Pablo Pepeng Paeng Pedring
Quinta Quedan Queenie Quiel
Rolly Ramil Reming Ramon
Siony Santi Seniang Sendong
Tonyo Tino Tomas Tisoy
Unding Undang Usman Ursula
Violeta Vinta Venus Viring
Winnie Wilma Waldo Weng
Yoyong Yolanda Yayang Yoyoy
Zosimo Zoraida Zeny Zigzag
Auxiliary List
Alakdan Alamid Agila Abe
Baldo Bruno Bagwis Berto
Clara Conching Chito Charo
Dencio Dolor Diego Dado
Estong Ernie Elena Estoy
Felipe Florante Felino Felion
Gardo Gerardo Gunding Gening
Heling Hernan Harriet Herman
Ismael Isko Indang Irma
Julio Jerome Jessa Jaime


Northern Indian Ocean

LIST 1 LIST 2 LIST 3 LIST 4 LIST 5 LIST 6 LIST 7 LIST 8
Onil Ogni Nisha Giri Helen Chapala Ockhi Fani
Agni Akash Bijli Jal Lehar Megh Sagar Vayu
Hibaru Gonu Aila Keila Madi Vaali Baazu Hikaa
Pyarr Yemyin Phyan Thane Nanauk Kyant Daye Kyarr
Baaz Sidr Ward Murjan Hudhud Nada Luban Maha
Fanoos Nargis Laila Nilam Nilofar Vardah Titli Bulbul
Mala Abe Bandu Mahasen Priya Sama Das Soba
Mukda Khai Muk Phet Phailin Komen Mora Phethai Amphan


Southwest Indian Ocean

2005-2006 2006-2007 2007-2008
Alvin Anita Ariel
Boloetse Bondo Bongwe
Carina Clovis Celina
Diwa Dora Dama
Elia Enok Elnus
Farda Favio Fame
Guduza Gamede Gula
Helio Humba Hondo
Isabella Indlala Ivan
Jaone Jaya Jokwe
Kundai Katse Kamba
Lindsay Lisebo Lola
Marinda Magoma Marabe
Nadety Newa Nungu
Otile Olipa Ofelia
Pindile Panda Pulane
Quincy Quincy Qoli
Rugare Rabeca Rossana
Sebina Shyra Sama
Timba Tsholo Tuma
Usta Unokubi Uzale
Velo Vuyane Vongai
Wilby Warura Warona
Xanda Xylo Xina
Yuri Yone Yamba
Zoelle Zouleha Zefa

These lists are used sequentially.


BACK TO HOMEPAGE