Detroit 365 Facts

Year

Topic

Events

1701

Detroit

City of Detroit was founded in 1701

1704

Baptism

First recorded baptism after the founding of Detroit was that of Marie Therese, daughter of Antoine de LaMothe and Therese Cadillac

1706

Death

First known death was that of Father Constantine de L'Halle, who was killed by an Indian in the summer of 1706

1751

Settlement

The settlement of Detroit was 50 years old, there were 483 people living in the village, 33 of whom were slaves. There were also 471 cows and 160 horses

1769

Belle Isle

Lieutenant George McDougall bought Hog Island, now known as Belle Isle, from the chiefs of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians for "five barrels of rum, three rolls of tobacco, three pounds of vermillion, and a belt of wampum, and three barrels of rum and three pounds of paint when possession was taken

1778

Daniel Boone

Daniel Boone was brought to Detroit and held for 10 days as a prisoner of the Shawnee Indians

1801

Age

Detroit turned 100 years old on July 24, 1801 but few people noticed

1805

Fire

On June 11, 1805, every thing but one stone building was destroyed in Detroit by a fire. No lives were lost

1805

Mayer

Salomon Sibley was the cityís first mayor

1805

Territory

Michigan territory established with Detroit as capital on Jan. 11, 1805

1807

Roads

Woodward Avenue was named after Judge August B. Woodward, one of the first judges of the Territory of Michigan

1809

Newspaper

Detroitís first weekly newspaper, the Michigan Essay and Impartial Observer, was published. Four editions, mostly in French, were published before it folded due to lack of paying subscribers

1815

Detroit

Detroit was incorporated as a city

1817

University of Michigan

Rev. Monteith, Father Richard and Judge Woodward established a college that was eventually named University of Michigan

1819

Theater

The first Detroit Theater opened in 1819 at Wayne and Woodbridge Streets

1824

Mayor John R. Williams

John R. Williams helped write the charter for Detroit and was elected the first mayor of the city under the new recorder council form of government, serving without pay

1827

Shipbuilding

The first steamship built in Detroit was the Argo

1833

Diocese of Detroit

The Diocese of Detroit was created by Pope Gregory XVI on March 8, 1833

1833

Underground railway

Blacks resist slave hunters. First official underground railway started through Detroit

1834

Moross House

Christopher Moross built his house between 1834 and 1848 The Moross House is the oldest standing brick residence in Detroit

1835

Detroit City Hall

The first Detroit City Hall opened

1838-1847

Capital

Detroit was the capital of Michigan from 1838-1847, until the state house was moved to Lansing

1839

First Black Church

Second Baptist Church opens- it is the first black church in Detroit

1840

Fort Wayne

Fort Wayne was built on the Detroit river in the 1840s during the tension years between the United States and Great Britain

1841

School

A school for black children opened in the basement of Second Baptist Church. There were 88 students

1845

Medicine

Detroitís first hospital, St. Vincentís on Randolph and Larned, opened in an old log building

1847

Telegraph

First telegraph installed in Detroit relayed messages between Detroit and Ypsilanti

1849

State Fair

First Michigan State Fair held in Detroit on Woodward between Adams and Montcalm

1850

Temple Beth El

First Jewish Synagogue Temple Beth El was founded

1851

Population

150 years after its founding Detroit City population was approximately 26,000, containing 600 brick buildings and 4,000 wood buildings

1856

Ferry Morse Seed Company

The firm known as Gardner, Ferry, and Church was founded in Detroit on April 1, 1856. It later became know as Ferry Morse Seed Company

1861

Police Department

The Detroit Police Department was formed on March 12, 1861

1861

School

Detroit's only high school is allowed to enroll girls

1861

Speed Limit

A speed limit of 6 mph was set on the streets of Detroit

1861

Vernors

Detroit was birthplace of Vernors

1863

Streetcars

Detroit opened its first streetcar line. The cars covered three miles at speeds up to six miles per hour

1865

Detroit Police

Detroit Police force is established

1865

Library

The Detroit Public Library opened its first branch, containing 5,000 books in a room in Capitol High School at State and Griswold. By 1875 the library had outgrown its location and a new library building was constructed at the site of the current Downtown branch on Gratiot

1865

Teacher

Fannie Richards becomes Detroit's first black teacher

1866

Medicine

Harper Hospital opened in response to the need to care for wounded Civil War soldiers

1868

Vernors James

Vernor served the first glass of Vernorís Ginger Ale in his pharmacy on Woodward Avenue

1871

Voting

Detroiter Nanette Gardener becomes the first woman in Michigan to vote

1872

Temperature

Detroit's lowest temperature was -24 degrees on Dec. 22, 1872

1873

Newspaper

James Scripps published the first issue of the Detroit News. The Free Press followed in 1831, first published under the name "The Democratic Free Press and Michigan Intelligence"

1875

Sanders

Fred Sanders opened his first candy store. He soon added ice cream and baked goods

1876

Barber John Wilson

Barber John Wilson became the first black person in Michigan elected to public office. He became the Wayne County coroner

1877

Cigars

Mr. Cornelius OíDwyer established himself as a manufacturer of cigars at a location on Michigan Ave. Little Shamrocks,the Mulligan Boyís Favorite,A.O.H. Favorite,and Soldier Boyís Favorite were well known brands of cigars. Along with his cigars, OíDwyer owned spacious Bath Rooms and Shaving Parlors, where many could enjoy a hot or cold bath with perfect cleanliness for fifteen cents

1877

Dental Company

Established in 1877, Woodworth & Co. was one of the leading dental companies. The dentists guaranteed painless operations to all patrons, with specialties including filling with silver, gold, or porcelain, the manufacturing of artificial teeth, and the preservation of natural teeth

1877

Founding

The Society of Jesus (Jesuits) founded Detroit College, which later became the University of Detroit

1877

Gas Company

Due to a bitter rivalry between Detroit gas companies, the city was divided into two district, each taking one as its exclusive territory. This resulted in the foundation of the Michigan Gas Light Company. The company contracted to light the streets of cities and towns, giving as brilliant a light as coal gas could provide

1877

Transportation

The shipping arrivals and clearances of vessels numbered 13,996, the tonnage amounting to 2,874,388 tons

1877

Steam Boiler

The marine and manufacturing interests of Detroit always created a large demand for steam boilers. The Central Boiler Works manufactured marine and stationary boilers, lard and tallow rendering kettles, tanks and all kinds of steal works

1877

Telephone

First telephone was installed in Detroit

1877

White & Uridge

White & Uridge was the sole agent in Michigan for Carlingís London ale and porter. They were also the proprietors of the celebrated Hop Extract, a popular tonic and highly commended for its medicinal properties

1877

Wholesale Dealer

Mr. Chas. Uelsmann established himself in business as a wholesale dealer in teas, coffees, spices, white wines, and cider vinegars. He made a specialty of cheese, Holland herring and fine fish, for first-class restaurants and grocery trade

1878

American District Carriage and Express Co.

American District Carriage and Express Co. organized with capital stock of $25,000. The company used twenty-five elegant coupes and car carriages and employed thirty experiences and capable drivers for the carriages

1878

B.C. Hill & Co.

B.C. Hill and Co. was the oldest and most equipped industrial arts firm in Michigan. They were house and sign painters, decorators, and dealers in wallpaper and window shades. They company decorated some of the finest mansions and buildings in Detroit

1878

M.M. Tucker

M.M. Tucker began the manufacturing of washboards and vinegar. The washboards were guaranteed to be the most durable and serviceable of any in use. Tucker also devoted his time to the manufacture of fine grades of pure white wine and cider vinegar, with a capacity of about ten barrels per day

1878

Restaurant

The Arch was a restaurant and saloon patronized by the highest class of citizens, and those fond of excellent delicacies. The restaurant had both a lunchroom, restaurant apartments, and bar stocked with fine wines, liquor, beer, ale, tobacco, cigars, etc.

1878

Singer Sewing Machine Company

During the year, the Singer Sewing Machine Company sold 431,167 machines; this was an increase of 74,735 over the soles of any previous year. The principle office was in New York, but the Detroit Office sold 1,000 machines every month and was the chief distribution point in Michigan

1878

Telegraph

The ubiquitous telegraph was supplemented with the telephone by the American District Telegraph Company and was first established at the corner of Congress and Griswold Streets. It had 700 instruments in use and added thirty new instruments per month

1878

Telephone

Detroitís first telephone exchange opened, with 80 subscribers

1879

Belle Isle

The City of Detroit purchased Belle Isle in 1879 and designated it a public park. The next year, the city commissioned the famed landscape architect, Frederick Law Olmstead, designer of New York's Central Park, to develop the park and design a plan for the island

1879

Detroit Car Spring Company

Among the large manufacturing enterprises that had been established in the suburbs of Detroit, and the only one of its kind in this part of the country, was the Detroit Car Spring Company, which was located on Michigan and Indiana Ave. They manufactured 3,000 tone of springs per year

1879

Detroit Public Library

The Detroit Public Library spent $123,291 to purchase 1,557 new books making a grand total of 41,943 books on the shelves on the library

1879

Electricity

Detroitís first electric lights switched in the Free Press building on West Larned

1879

Photograph Gallery

Mr. J. A. Kier created one of the most successful photograph galleries in the western part of the city. Tintypes were made with a great degree of perfection, while ordinary paper and collodion processes received due attention

1879

Printing Supply

In May, Messrs. Gebhard and Kramer opened a company that made a specialty of printing supplies. The company offered a wide variety of type, printing press, inks, cases, stands, printing paper, envelopes, cards, etc. The business included a full line of printing papers, including flat caps, books, and newspapers, in various weights and colors

1880

Cattle

The Common Council adapted an ordinance prohibiting the running at large of cattle in parks and other public spaces

1880

Horse Accommodation

Williams and Bro Livery and Boarding Stables contained the most complete accommodations for sixteen boarding horses and twenty-two horses for hire

1880

H. W. Rood & Co

H. W. Rood & Co, Brass Founders and Finishers, was the sole inventor and manufacturer of the only clear open water-way valve and the most perfect lawn fountain, "Maid of the Mist". The company also did a large business in hosepipes and sprinklers

1880

Mr. Wm. C. Kaeding

The establishment of Mr. Wm. C. Kaeding at 128 Gratiot Ave., contained a full line of boots and shoes. He made a specialty of ladiesí fine boots

1880

Population

Detroit had a population of 116,340; it was the 17th largest city in the U.S.

1881

Baseball

Baseball in Detroit dates to 1881 when the team was known as the Detroits or Detroit Wolverines of the National League until 1888

1881

Hudson

Joseph Lowthian Hudson opened his first store in Detroit. It was a men's' and boys' clothing store housed on the first floor of the old Detroit Opera House Building on Campus Martius

1881

Stove

Peninsular Stove Company organized by James Dwyer. Detroit became the nation's center for stove manufacturing

1881

Vienna Coffee House

In April J. Flowers and his family established the Vienna Coffee House. The coffee house proved to be a large benefit to the City of Detroit serving almost 300 visitors per day, with an annual income of $18,000. The Vienna Coffee House was located at 111 Griswold Street

1882

Baking House

L. A. White opened his fancy baking of pies, cakes, and bread business. Five assistants, using three wagons, delivered goods to all parts of the city

1883

Electric Arc Street Lighting

The First electric arc street lighting was installed on Jefferson and Woodward

1883

Harper Hospital

Harper Hospital was founded in 1863 to care for Civil War soldiers. Gordon W. Lloyd designed the current Harper Hospital Building in 1883

1883

Henry A. Newland & Co

Among the leading houses in Detroit extensively engaged in the hat and fur trade, and that of straw goods, was Henry A. Newland & Co. The firm occupied a five story warehouse at 124 and 126 Jefferson Ave

1883

Pelham

Benjamin Pelham and his brother Robert Pelham, helped found the "Detroit Plaindealer" the first successful Black owned newspaper in Detroit

1883

Wages

In a survey undertaken that year, the average daily wage of male skilled and unskilled workers was $1.74. Some average daily wages include: barbers--$1.31, carpenters--$1.59, clerks and salesmen $1.92, masons--$2.56, printers--$1.63, cooks--$1.67, bricklayer--$2.81. Average hours worked per day was 12 hours. City employees received annual salaries, for example, police patrolmen were paid $750 yearly. Women were paid less than men were-the average daily wage of 503 women was seventy-eight cents! Forty-five women received forty-five cents or less per day. Milliners
were highest paid at $1.07 per day

1884

Detroit Fire Department

The Detroit Fire Department owned the only steam fire engine in the area, which weighed 5 tons, had a top speed of 15 miles per hour, cost $5000 and was nicknamed "Hercules"

1884

Piano

Simon H. Frank began the manufacturing of high quality pianos in November of this year. He manufactured upright, grand, and square pianos known for their style, beauty, and purity of tone. His leading piano was constructed of an iron frame that had the capability of sustaining 22 tons of tension

1885

Arts

The Detroit Institute of Arts was founded

1885

Civil Rights Act

The Michigan Civil Rights Act which prohibited racial discrimination in public areas went into effect

1885

Music Store

Mr. O.F. Berdan established a music store in April that sold a full line of band, orchestra, and sheet music, as well as violins, cornets and band instruments. Mr. Berdanís specialty though was publishing sheet music of all kinds, the value of which amounted to $15,000

1886

Seminary of SS. Cyril and Methodius

The Seminary of SS. Cyril and Methodius opened in Detroit in 1886 to train students of Polish birth or descent for priestly work among Poles in the United States

1887

Ste. Anne Church

In 1887, Leon Coquard built the eighth, and current, Ste. Anne Roman Catholic Church. Father Gabriel Richard's remains are contained in the crypt in its chapel as well as relics from the 1828 church which Gabriel built

1888

Museum of Art

Detroit Museum of Art opens at Jefferson and Hastings

1890

Population

The population of Detroit rose to 205,876, the 15th largest city in the U.S. The city area covered 29 Ĺ square miles

1892

Ferguson

William W. Ferguson was the first Black elected to the Michigan Legislature serving two terms in Lansing in the House of Representatives

1893

Donation

Ex-Senator Thomas W. Palmer donated the land known as Palmer park to the city. Its centerpiece was a log cabin that was an exact reproduction of the home in which Palmer resided when Detroit was little more than a trading post

1893

Palmer Park

Senator Thomas and Lizzie Merrill Palmer donated Palmer Park to the city of Detroit in 1893. It consisted of 130 acres carved from their 725-acre estate

1894

Indian Village

In 1894, the Abraham Cook Farm was subdivided for 300 homes called Indian Village

1895

Yacht Club

The Detroit Yacht Club was founded

1896

Automobile

Henry Ford tests his first car, the Quadricycle. The first auto is driven in Detroit by Charles B. King

1896

Baseball

On April 28, the Detroit Tigers, playing as a member of the Western League, played their inaugural game at Bennett Park marking the beginning of more than 100 years of playing baseball at the corners of Michigan and Trumbull

1896

Baseball

The Detroit American League Baseball Company was nicknamed the Detroit Tigers in 1896 by Phil Reid, Sporting Editor of the Detroit Free Press. The original nickname was the Wolverines

1896

Charles Brady King

On March 6, 1896, Charles Brady King drove the first gasoline powered automobile, which he designed and built, on the streets of Detroit

1896

Convention Bureau

First Convention Bureau in the world was organized in Detroit by Milton Carmichael, a reporter for the Detroit Journal

1896

Opera

The first moving picture in Detroit was shown in the Detroit Opera House (Capitol Theater)

1897

Nothing over ten cents store

Sebastian S. Kresge opened a store in Detroit in partnership with J. G. McCory. Kresge took over full interest in 1899. The store slogan was: Nothing over ten cents

1897

Phyllis Wheatley Home

The Phyllis Wheatley Home for Aged Colored Ladies was founded by a group of black socially elite women

1898

Boblo

The Detroit, Belle Isle, and Windsor Ferry Company ran its first excursion ferry to Boblo Island, then known as Bois Blanc island. At its peak, the park drew over 750,000 people a year. The park closed in 1993

1890

Death rate

Detroit's death rate was 14.04 per thousand, well below other large cities. Infant mortality was high with 1,149 of 4,934 deaths recorded that year. One half of the deaths were for persons under the age of thirty. Diphtheria claimed 617 lives and scarlet fever 343

1890

Population

285,204 people lived in the City of Detroit, making it the 13th largest city in the U.S

1901

Baseball

On April 25, the Western League changed its name to its current name the American League and on April 25, 1901 the Detroit Tigers, at Bennett Park, made their American League home debut

1902

Charles Lindbergh

Charles Lindbergh was born on February 4, 1902 in his grandfather's house at 1120 W. Forest Ave, Detroit. In 1927 he made the first nonstop solo flight from New York to Paris in a tiny silver monoplane called Spirit of St. Louis, now hanging in the Smithsonian Museum in Washington, D.C.

1903

Pewabic Pottery

March Chase Perry Stratton, sculptor, and Harry Caulkins, ceramic specialist, established Pewabic Pottery

1904

Anna Scripps Whitcomb Conservatory

The Anna Scripps Whitcomb Conservatory, designed by Albert Kahn, was constructed on Belle Isle. It was reconstructed in the years 1952 through 1954, and in 1955 was dedicated to Anna Scripps Whitcomb for her contribution to the cultural life of the City of Detroit

1904

Ford Motor Company

Henry Ford established his first big plant the Ford Piquette Avenue Plant in 1904

1904

Ralph Bunche

Ralph Bunche, U. S. Diplomat and chief mediator for the United Nations Palestine Commission, was the first African-American awarded the Nobel Peace Prize (1950) after he successfully negotiated deals between Israel and its Arab neighbors that established armistice lines in 1949. He was born in Detroit in 1904

1905

America's First State Fair

America's first state fair, sponsored by the Michigan Agricultural Society, moved to its present and permanent home on Woodward and State Fair

1905

Baseball

On August 30, 1905 Ty Cobb signed a contract to become a Detroit Tiger, with an annual salary of $1800. He stayed with the Tigers for 20 years

1905

Mayor Martin

Joseph A. Martin graduated from the University of Detroit. He was a member of the Detroit City Council and became acting mayor on June 10, 1924 when Mayor Frank Doremus resigned because of poor health. Martin served until August 2nd, 1924

1907

Baseball

On October 8, the Detroit Tigers appeared in their first World Series Championship. However, they eventually were swept 4 games to 0 by the Chicago Cubs

1907

Steamer

The Steamer City of Cleveland, which went into commission on the Detroit-Cleveland run in 1907, was the largest and fastest passenger vessel on fresh water. According to the officials of the Detroit & Cleveland Navigation Co., she carried 3,500 passengers. Her 1,00 horsepower engines drove her at a speed of 25 miles an hour

1908

Ford Motor Company

The famous Model T automobile was first at the Piquette Avenue Plant in 1908

1908

Lighthouse

A lighthouse was built on Peche Island (a smaller island not far from Belle Isle) at the entrance to the Detroit River. In the early 1980s it was in danger of collapsing, so the coast guard built a new lighthouse on the site and moved the original one to the Marine City Nautical Park, on the shores of the St. Clair River

1909

Concrete Highway

The first mile of concrete highway was constructed in 1909, cost $13, 537, was used until 1922, and is on the east side of Woodward between Six and Seven Mile Roads

1909

Hudson Motor Car Company

J. L. Hudson formed his own automobile company, the Hudson Motor Car Co, in 1909. The first car came off the assembly line on July 3, 1909. By1929 the car company was third in the industry behind Ford and Chevrolet

1911

Center Line

The first center line in the world was put on River Road near Trendon

1911

Hudson

J. L. Hudson opened a new store on Woodward Avenue. This 25-story building was the world's tallest department store. It was 2 million square feet with five basements, 51 passenger elevators, 17 freight elevators, 51 display windows, 706 fitting rooms, and 5000 windows

1912

Baseball

On April 12, the Detroit Tigers defeated the Cleveland Indians in the inaugural game at Navin Field, which is recognized as the beginnings of Tiger Stadium

1912

Sebastian S. Kresge

Sebastian S. Kresge, who founded the S.S. Kresge Co., was born in Detroit

1913

Ford Motor Company

April 1, 1913 early experiments with assembly line began in Highland Park

1914

$5.00 a Day Pay

On January 5,1914 Henry Ford announced that he would pay $5.00 a day to his workers. He wanted to ensure that the people who built the cars could afford to buy them

1914

Detroit Symphony Orchestra

In 1914, ten young society women founded the Detroit Symphony Orchestra by contributing $100 each, then pledging to find 100 other subscribers to donate ten dollars a piece

1914

Ford Motor Company

$5 daily wage for 8 hour day replaces $2.34 for 9 hour day for male factory Workers

1915

Belle Isle Bridge

On April 27th the Belle Isle Bridge burned

1915

Blessed Sacrament Cathedral

Henry A. Walsh built the most Blessed Sacrament Cathedral, an example of Norman Gothic, in 1915. Its towers were completed by Diehl and Diehl in 1951

1915

Ford Motor Company

The one millionth Ford car was produced

1915

Kiwanis International

Detroit was the site of the birth of the world wide business organization, called the Kiwanis International in the Griswold Hotel in January, 1915

1915

Police

Detroit police began using stop signs at major intersections in 1915

1916

Detroit Urban League

The Detroit Urban League was founded

1916

General Motors

General Motors is incorporated

1916

Industrial production

Between 1915 and 1916 industrial production rose from $600,000 to $900,000,000. During the same interval the value of automotive products doubled from $300,000,000 to $600,000,000. And in 1916 the cigar production reached 1,000,000 cigars a day

1916

Lawson

Dr. William Hiram Lawson the first African American optometrist in America. After taking the Michigan State Board examination, Lawson was presented with a trophy in recognition of being the first African American to pass the examination. Lawson opened his first Detroit office at 588 Gratiot. He became the first professional African American male to move into the Tobin Building, 1308 Broadway

1917

Detroit News Building

The Detroit News Building was built in 1917 by Albert Kahn

1918

Dunbar Memorial Hospital

Local Black physicians built their own hospital, Dunbar Memorial Hospital. The 1920ís were not good years for Detroitís African American doctors. These physicians were not appointed to hospital staffs and some hospitals denied their patients admittance. An historical site, Dunbar Memorial still stands at Frederick and St. Antoine Street and is maintained by the Detroit Medical Society

1918

Traffic Light

The first read, yellow, green light was installed at Michigan and Monroe

1919

Orchestra Hall

Orchestra Hall, designed by C. Howard Crane, moved to its present location in 1919. DSO's first concert at the hall was on October 23, 1919. Weber's overture to the opera Oberon opened the program followed by Mozart's Concerto in E-flat for two pianos and orchestra, Bach's Concerto in C Major for three pianos and orchestra, and Beethoven's Symphony No. 5 in C Minor

1919

Police

Josephine S. Davis was the first female police officer in Detroit

1919

Sacred Heart Seminary

Sacred Heart Seminary opened in September 1919 with 85 students. The initial curriculum encompassed only the ninth and tenth grades which would be expanded annually until it included a complete high school and college curriculum

1919

Safety Patrol Guards

Detroit introduces safety patrol guards in 1919. Women joined the ranks in 1951

1920

Levin

Theodore Levin, after whom the United States Courthouse in Detroit is named, graduated from the University of Detroit School of Law in 1920

1920

Population

Detroit is the 4th largest city in the U.S. with a population of 993,678

1920

Radio

WWJ broadcast the first radio program in Detroit

1921

Historical Society

The Detroit Historical Society was founded

1921

People

Father John P. McNichols became President of the University of Detroit. Later, in his honor, Six Mile road was changed to McNichols road

1922

Ford Motor

The forty hour work week was adopted as policy by the Ford Motor Company on March 25th

1922

General Motors Building

Designed by Albert Kahn, the fifteen-story General Motors Building, was completed in 1922. It contained 1800 offices, an auditorium, exposition halls, auto display rooms, shops, a gymnasium, a cafeteria, and lounges

1922

WJR

WJR started as WCX, in 1928 it became WJR

1923

Detroit Police Headquarters

The Detroit Police Headquarters located at Beaubien and Macomb, was built in 1923 by Albert Kahn Associates

1923

Mayor Miriani

Louis Charles Miriani recieved an LL.B. from the University of Detroit Law School. Elected to the Detroit Common Council in 1947, he served as council president from 1950-57 and acting mayor during Mayor Albert Cobo's convalescence and again upon Cobo's death in 1957. Miriani won the 1957 election for mayor

1924

Chrysler

The Chrysler Corporation was founded

1924

Young

Beulah Young was the only woman of color to graduate from the Detroit Conservatory of Music

1926

Harry Houdine

Harry Houdine died in Detroit in 1926

1926

Hockey

On December 25, Detroit was awarded a National Hockey League franchise. The cost was $100,000 and the Detroit team was originally named the Detroit Cougars

1927

City Airport

Detroit City Airport opened

1927

Detroit Institute of Arts

Paul P. Cret was the chief designer for the 1927 Italian Renaissance central building of the Detroit Institute of Arts. The south and north wings were added in 1966 and 1971 respectively

1927

Detroit Zoo

First zoo with barless exhibits

1927

Hockey

On November 22, the Detroit Cougars played their first game at Detroit's Olympia Stadium on Grand River and McGraw

1927

Marygrove College

Marygrove College was founded

1928

Coast Guard

The Coast Guard stationed armored craft along the Detroit River to curb the flow of Canadian liquor into Detroit

1928

Masonic Temple

The present Gothic building, the Masonic Temple, designed by George D. Mason, was completed in 1928

1928

Fisher Building

The Fisher Building, located at Grand Boulevard and Second Avenue, was completed in 1928 at a cost of $10 million. It was designed by architect Albert Kahn and contains 500,000 square feet of office space, 99,000 square feet of retail space and the Fisher Theater

1928

Fox Theatre

Opening night of the Fox Theatre on September 21,1928, 5,000 invited guests saw . "Street Angel," starring Charles Farrell and Janet Gaynor. Designed by C. Howard Crane, it was the second largest theater in the world

1929

American Coney Island

American Coney Island opened

1929

Ambassador Bridge

The Ambassador Bridge was first opened to traffic on Nov. 15, 1929. It took over two years to build from the day the contract was signed in 1927 to completion. It is the world's longest international suspension bridge measuring 9,200 feet long and 152 feet tall. Nearly 10 million vehicles cross the bridge every year

1929

Prohibition

Illegal liquor sales topped $215 million and was the second biggest business in Detroit, just behind automobile sales

1929-1930

Henderson

Cornelius L. Henderson, a resident of Detroitís old Westside, is best known as the Black man who was one of the structural steel designers for the Ambassador Bridge and the Detroit-Windsor Tunnel

1929

Henry Ford Museum

Henry Ford Museum and Greenfield Village opens

1929

Soup Kitchen

Priest Solanus Casey and Herman Buss open a soup kitchen at St. Bonaventure Monastery

1930

Detroit Windsor Tunnel

The Detroit Windsor Tunnel, built in 1930, is 5, 135 feet long , with a 13.5 foot ceiling clearance. It was the third major subaqueous motor vehicle tunnel constructed in the US

1930

Frank Murphy

Frank Murphy was elected mayor

1930

Population

The population of Detroit rose to 1, 568,662, making Detroit the fourth largest city in the U.S

1930ís

Young

Dr. James ("J.P.") Young was the first Black man to be appointed by Mayor Frank Murphy as Detroitís city physician. He held the position for about six years before retiring to private practice

1931

Better Made

Better Made potato chips began in 1931, and are still made in Detroit

1932

Hockey

In the summer of 1932 the Detroit hockey team became known as the Detroit Red Wings

1932

Leon Wheeler

Leon (Toy) Wheeler, director of the old Brewster Center, started the classic match between the Harlem Globetrotters and the Brewster Old-Timers, which lasted about 12 years. Every Thanksgiving the game was followed by a dance considered the social event of the season. The game and dance were always sold out leaving people to line up outside to hear the score, then listen to the music

1932

Sport

Johnny Milar was the first Detroit boxer to represent the city in the Olympics

1933

Lone Ranger

The Lone Rangers had itís first broadcast from WXYZ Detroit on January 20, 1933

1933

Sport

Joe Louis became the Golden Gloves light heavyweight champion

1933

Sport

Johnny Milar beat Flash Riser to become Michigan heavyweight champion

1934

Football

On June 30, the Portsmouth, Ohio Spartans of the National Football League were purchased by George A. Richards and moved to Detroit becoming the Detroit Lions of the National Football League

1934

Football

On September 23, the Detroit Lions played their first National Football League game at the University of Detroit Stadium

1934

Temperature

Detroit experienced its highest temperature of 105 degrees

1935

Baseball

On October 7, the Detroit Tigers defeated the Chicago Cubs 4-3 to win the 6th game of the World Series and with that win clinched their first World Series Championship

1935

Football

On December 15, the Detroit Lions defeated the New York Giants 26-7 to win the first of their four (4) National Football League Championships

1935

UAW

United Auto Workers was founded

1936

Hockey

On March 24-25, the Detroit Red Wings and the Montreal Maroons played the longest National Hockey League game in history with the winning goal being scored by Mud Bruneteau at 16:30 of the sixth overtime giving the Red Wings a 1-0 victory

1936

Hockey

On April 11, the Detroit Red Wings defeated Toronto 3-2 to win the first of their nine (9) Stanley Cup Championships, most amongst any American hockey team

1936

Kelsey Hayes

Kelsey Hayes Wheel Company had a sit down strike , as result the UAW negotiated a .75 cent minimum wage, overtime and slow down of the assembly line

1937

General Motors

General Motors sit-down strikes in Canada and US. Workers win first UAW contract

1937

Louis

Joe Louis became heavyweight champion of the world. Louisí fighting record was sixty-eight victories, only three defects, none while champion. Joe died on April 12, 1981

1937

Sport

Joe Louis knocked out James Braddock in Chicago to become the new heavyweight champion of the world

1938

Baseball

On April 22, an expanded Navin Field became Briggs Stadium and with the expansion Detroit became the first city to have a completely double-decked and enclosed baseball stadium

1938

Drive-ins

The Detroit Drive-in, Detroitís first Drive-in theater, opened

1939

Chrysler

Chrysler auto strike

1940

Austin

Richard Bates Austin became Michiganís first Black certified public accountant, passing the CPA exam in 1940

1940

Edward Jeffries

Edward Jeffries takes office as Mayor of Detroit for the first of six terms

1940ís

Gotham Hotel

The Gotham Hotel owned by John White, was one of several African American owned hotels in Detroit. It was the finest "Negro" hotel in the country at the time. It was located at John R. St. and Orchestra Place. The beautiful Ebony Room was the site for many special Sunday dinner parties, and hundreds of westsiders spent their honeymoon at the Gotham Hotel

1940ís

Tobin Building

The Tobin building located on Broadway at Gratiot in Downtown Detroit was the first building to lease office space to African Americans

1941

Army guards

On Dec 8th army guards stationed at the Detroit Windsor tunnel and bridge after Pearl Harbor attack

1941

Baseball

On July 8, Detroit's Briggs Stadium played host to their first Major League Baseball All Star Game. The Americans won 7-5

1941

Baseball

Hank Greenberg of the Detroit Tigers became the first American League baseball player to enlist for service in World War II in December 1941

1941

Judge

Lila Neuenfelt was the first Michigan female circuit court judge at the Wayne County Circuit Court in Detroit

1941

Radios

Detroit heard itís first FM broadcast from W45D, 44.5

1942

Ration book

The first ration book is issued in Detroit on May 4, 1942

1943

Race riots

Race riots broke out on June 21st. Federal troops were called in to maintain order

1943

Sojourner Truth housing project

The Sojourner Truth housing project was the scene of a clash between whites and African Americans on Feb 28th

1944

Davison Expressway

The Davison Expressway opened in 1944 and was originally built to provide better access for workers at the automobile plants in the area. It is 2.85 miles long and located between M-10/John C Lodge and I-75/W P Chrysler freeways. It is hailed as the first "urban depressed freeway" in the country. In 1997 it was designated M-8 when it reopened to traffic after being shut down for over one year for a $45 million reconstruction project

1944

Distinguished Service Cross

Detroiter Charles Thomas was the first African American to receive the Distinguished Service Cross

1945

Bob Seger

Bob Seger was born on May 6, 1945 in Detroit. He was in several bands in the early 60ís but hit the top 20 charts with his band the Bob Seger System in 1968 with "Ramblin Gambliní Man

1945

Dillard

Gladys Somerville Dillard, was the first Black nurse to earn a B.S. in Nursing from Wayne State University. Dillard retired as head of Public Health Nursing from the Detroit Health Department

1945

Reconversion

Reconversion from the war effort in the auto plants begins

1946

Buddy's Pizza

Buddy's Pizza opened on 6 mile and Conant in 1946

1946

Hockey

On October 16, Gordie Howe debuted as a Detroit Red Wing scoring the first of his 975 career professional goals

1946

Walter Reuther

Walter Reuther elected president of the UAW

1947

Television

On May 31, 1947 WWJ, channel 4 (now WDIV), airs the first televised newscast in Detroit

1948

Alice Cooper

Born February 4, 1948 as Vincent Damon Furnier. In the 70ís he was known as "master of shock rock, " using a guillotine and electric chair as stage props and a live snake as part of his wardrobe. His first hit single to hit the top 40 was "Eighteen, " in 1971

1948

Baseball

June 15, the first night game at Briggs Stadium. The Tigers beat the Oakland Athletics 4-1. This was the last stadium in the American League to install lights

1948

Parking meter

The first parking meters were installed on Detroit streets on Oct. 6

1948

United Way

The United Way in Detroit is nationís oldest community fund-raising organization

1949

City Council

Mary V. Beck becomes first female member of Detroit City Council

1949

Detroit Symphony Orchestra

The Detroit Symphony Orchestra disbanded

1949

Screenwriter

Jack Epps, Jr., Hollywood screenwriter for Top Gun 1986, Dick Tracy1990, Legal Eagles1986, The Secret of My Success 1987, Turner and Hooch 1989, Anaconda, 1997, The Flintstones in Viva Rock Vegas, 2000 was born in Detroit in 1949. He often paired with Jim Cash to become one of Hollywood's most successful screenwriting duo

1950

Population

Detroit reaches 1.8 million people, largest it ever was, and the nation's fourth largest city

1950

UAW

UAW and General Motors sign a contract provides for pensions, automatic cost of living wage adjustments, and guaranteed increases over the life of the contract

1951

Detroit Symphony Orchestra

The first concert by the newly reactivated Detroit Symphony Orchestra was held on Oct 18th

1951

Law

Frank Kelley, who served as Michiganís Attorney General from 1961-1998 graduated from the University of Detroit Law School in 1951

1951

Sport

Joe Louis fought his final fight in Detroit again rocky Marciano

1951

UAW

Walter Reuther, President of UAW, is elected President of the CIO

1952

Black Deejay

Jack Surrell was Detroitís first Black Deejay

1952

Jones

Judge Charles W. Jones, the first Black appointed to Recorderís Court

1952

Traffic

Detroit began using left turn lanes

1953

Channel 56

Mercy College joins University of Detroit, Wayne State University and the Detroit Board of Education plan to open studios for an educational non-profit, non-commercial television station (Channel 56)

1953

Television

Soupy Sales debuts his Detroit children's TV show, The Soupy Sales Show, live on WXYZ, channel 7

1954

Curtis Laboratories

Dr. Austin W. Curtis, Jr. an African American established the A.W. Curtis Laboratories on 30th Street. Thus Detroit became the headquarters for manufactured products created by this eminent research chemist. Curtis Laboratories manufactures many personal products such as cosmetics, hair preparations, and rubbing oils for the relief or arthritic pain and rheumatic pain

1954

Northland Mall

Northland Mall , the first shopping mall in the US, opened

1955

Palmer Park Frank Lloyd Wright Home

In 1955 Dorothy Turkel commissioned Frank Lloyd Wright to design a house for her in Palmer Woods. The design was "Usonian Automatic," one of few built, constructed completely out of concrete blocks including the ceilings. It was a two-story, L-shaped structure with 4,000 square feet

1955

Television

Channel 56, an educational television station, first began broadcasting from studios at the University of Detroit, Wayne State University, and the Detroit Public School headquarters

1955

UAW

UAW win supplementary unemployment benefits in bargaining with Ford

1956

Streetcars

Streetcars deactivated and sold to Mexico.

1956

Wayne State University

Wayne State University was officially created as a state institution in 1956, succeeding Wayne University. Itís main campus is located at the junctions of the Ford and Lodge Expressways and encompasses 203 acres with 96 major buildings. It has over 31,000 students and is designated a Carnegie Research Institution

1957

City Council

William Patrick is first African-American elected to the City Council

1957

Football

On December 29, the Detroit Lions defeated the Cleveland Browns 59-14 to win their most recent and last National Football League Championship

1958

Baseball

On June 6, the Detroit Tigers desegregated their baseball club when Ozzie Virgil took the field as a Detroit Tiger

1958

Detroit Fireworks

The Detroit fireworks marks the highlight of the International Freedom Festival celebrated by Detroit and Windsor. It feature more than 8,000 pyrotechnic explosion shot from barges on the Detroit River

1958

International Freedom Festival

The First International Freedom Festival took place with celebrations of freedom shared in the two neighboring international cities of Detroit and Windsor

1959

DeBusschere

Dave DeBusschere began playing basketball for the University of Detroit Titans in the fall of 1959

1959

International Freedom Festival

The first International Freedom Festival took place in 1959 and was presided over by Queen Elizabeth and Prince Philip during its opening ceremony. This 15 day festival celebrates independence days for the United States and Canada and is the world's largest international festival, attracting more than 3 million people a year

1959-1988

Edwards

Esther Gordy Edwards was the senior vice president and corporate secretary of Motown Records Corporation, the largest manufacturer of 45 RPMís in the world. She directed the personal management of Diana Ross and The Supremes, Stevie Wonder, The Temptations, Marvin Gaye, The Four Tops, Smokey Robinson and the Miracles, and many others. She is also the founder and vice president of the Gordy Foundation

1959

Motown

Barry Gordy borrows $800 from his family to found Motown records. Motown's first office is in the family house at 2648 West Grand Boulevard

1959

Motown

Mary Wells writes and records "Bye, Bye, Baby" which becomes a top ten hit

1960

Cobo Conference and Exhibition Center

Cobo Conference and Exhibition Center was built along the Detroit River

1960

Motown

"Shop Around" by Smokey Robinson and the Miracles became a number one hit on the R&B charts

1961

Baseball

On April 11, the Detroit Tigers opened the season playing in the renamed Tiger Stadium

1961

Mayor Cavanagh

Jerome Patrick was elected mayor in 1961 on his first try for an elected office

1961

Motown

"Please Mr. Postman" by the Marvelettes became Motownís first number one hit

1963

Martin Luther King

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and 125,000 people march down Woodward Ave. for racial equality

1965

Art

Paul Paray, conductor emeritus of the Detroit Symphony Orchestra, presented Mercy College of Detroit the original manuscript of his musical settings of "Salve Regina", written in 1929

1966

Cavanagh

The Hon. Michael F. Cavanagh, Justice, Michigan Supreme Court, graduated from the University of Detroit School of Law in 1966

1967

Austin

Richard Bates Austin turned his attention to public office, first becoming Wayne County Auditor. He was the first Black candidate to run for mayor of Detroit and polled 49 percent of the vote in his loss to Roman Gribbs

1967

Detroit riot

July 23, 1967, Detroit, which had been viewed as a model city in race relations, became the scene of the most violent and destructive riot of the 1960's. The city suffered forty- three deaths, at least 1,000 injuries, and the looting or burning of 2,500 stores before city and state police, the National Guard, and Army paratroopers restored order

1968

Baseball

On September 14, Denny McLain, of the Detroit Tigers, defeated the Oakland Athletics to win his 30th game of the season, the first to accomplish such a feat since Dizzy Dean's 30 victories in 1934 and also the last pitcher to reach such a high standard

1968

Focus Hope

Focus Hope is founded

1969

Cornelia Kennedy

Cornelia Kennedy was the first Michigan woman to serve on a federal branch. She was appointed to the U.S. District court in 1969

1969

Henry Ford II

Henry Ford II received the Presidential Medal of Freedom

1969

Jean Pearson

Jean Pearson, a Detroit News writer, became the first woman to set foot on Antarctica

1969

Randall

In the fall of 1969 Dudley Randall, African-American owner and publisher of the Broadside Press, joined the University of Detroit as poet-in-residence and part-time reference librarian

1970

Austin

Richard Bates Austin was elected the first Black Secretary of State and served with distinction for an unprecedented six terms in office

1970

Conyers

Nathan G. Conyers own Detroit's only African American-owned dealership and the oldest African American-owned dealership in the United States

1970

Mayor Gribbs

Roman S. Gribbs was the first Polish Catholic mayor of Detorit from 1970-1974

1971

Broom

Vivian Smith-Broom and her husband, formed Broom Designs Inc., a greeting card company specializing in African-American themes. The home based business grew into the present office and warehouse on Meyers near Puritan. Years of hard work created a successful business currently handing 500 accounts locally and nationally. Broom Designs, a pioneer in the specialization of greeting cards for the African American population

1973

Railroad traffic

Railroad traffic across the Detroit River by ferry ends

1973

Young

A longtime civil rights and social activist, Coleman Alexander Young won election as Detroit's first Black mayor in 1973 and served as unprecedented five terms

1974

Mayor

Coleman Alexander Young is sworn in as first African-American mayor of Detroit

1975

Jimmy Hoffa

On July 30, 1975, James Riddle Hoffa, former Teamster president, left his Lake Orion home for a meeting at the Machus Red Fox and was never seen again. He was a controversial union official who became Teamster president in October 1957 from June 1971. He made many enemies during his union days and his disappearance remains a mystery to this day

1975

Television

In September 1975, WGPR-TV Detroit, channel 62, signs on (now WWJ-TV). It is the USA's first black-owned TV station.

1976

Flag

Hudson's donates the world's biggest flag to the Smithsonian. The flag is 235 feet by 104 feet

1977

Keith

Damon Keith, J.D. is a product of the Detroit Public Schools and a graduate of Northwestern High School. At present, Keith is judge, U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit, where he was appointed. Previously, he was a U.S. District Judge, Eastern District of Michigan, and Chief Judge, US District Court, Eastern district. Keith received numerous honorary doctorate degrees from universities which include: Wayne State University, Howard University, Yale University, Morehouse, and Georgetown University. In addition, Damon Keith has published in various legal journals and has served in many civil positions in the Detroit area

1977

Renaissance Center

Phase I of the Renaissance Center, consisting of a 70-story hotel and four 39-story office buildings, officially opened. Two more towers were opened in 1981

1978

Joe Louis Arena

Joe Louis Arena opened

1979

Montreux Detroit Jazz Festival

The Montreux Detroit Jazz Festival is the largest free jazz festival in North America. It started in 1979 and takes place every year at Hart Plaza and showcases some of the best local, national and international talent in jazz

1979

Sculpture in Hart Plaza

In 1979, Isamu Noguchi designed the abstract aluminum and steel sculpture in Hart Plaza. A bubbling circular fountain spraying water from its ring

1980

Bing

Bing Steel, Inc., was started in the Detroit area by business executive and former basketball player Dave Bing. It took $80,000 of Bing's savings and a $250,000 loan to start Bing Steel, which processes steel as opposed to making it. By 1990 sales were $61 million, making Bing Steel the 10th largest black owned company in the United States, according to Black Enterprise

1980

Jazz festival

The first Detroit Montreux Jazz Festival, named after Montreau, a small town in the Swiss Alps famous for its jazz festivals, took place on Labor Day

1981

Young

Coleman A. Young received the prestigious Spingard Medal for distinguished achievement

1981

Lights on Ambassador Bridge

On November 23, 1981, Detroit Mayor Coleman Young and Windsor Mayor Bert Weeks jointly turned the switch to illuminate the Ambassador Bridge for the first time in its history

1982

Grand Prix

Detroit hosted its first Grand Prix in 1982. The race was brought to Detroit by the Detroit Renaissance, Inc., as a Formula One Series and its course ran through the streets of downtown Detroit. In 1989, it transferred to the IndyCar format moving to Belle Isle Park in 1992

1983

Hudson's Close Downtown Store

The downtown J. L. Hudson store closed its doors forever in January, 1983, ending a 102 year run and signaling the demise of retail in downtown Detroit

1984

Baseball

The Detroit Tigers won their last World Series game

1984

Holocaust Memorial Center

The Holocaust Memorial Center, the first in the United States, was founded to preserve the history and memory of Jews murdered by the Nazis in Europe during World War II

1985

DALNET

Founded in 1985 as a non-profit corporation, DALNET or Detroit Area Library Network, enables its member libraries to better serve the information needs of their users. It is one of the premier consortiums of multi-type libraries in the country

1985

Edwards

Esther Gordy Edwards founder the Motown Historical Museum. She serves as itís chairman and chief executive officer

1986

Arm and Fist Sculpture

At the foot of Woodward at Jefferson Avenue lies a 24-foot long arm and fist honoring Joe Louis, the heavyweight boxing champion from 1937 to 1949. It was designed by Robert Graham in 1986

1987

Detroit People Mover

Detroit People Mover opened

1987

Pope

Pope John Paul II stopped in Detroit on Friday, Sept. 18, 1987 for a two day visit

1987

Rosary Murders

The movies Rosary Murders was filmed in Detroit

1989

Free Press & Detroit News

The Detroit News and Detroit Free Press began operating under a joint operating agreement

1989-1990

Thomas

Isiah Thomas won two NBA championships with the Detroit Pistons in 1989 and 1990

1990

Census

The population in Detroit for 1990 was 1,027,974. 21.6% of the population was white and 75,7% was black

1991

Boblo Boats

1991 marked the last year the Boblo boats, SS Columbia and SS Ste. Claire, left the Detroit docks for Boblo Island Amusement Park in Canada

1992

Ambassador Bridge

In 1992, the Ambassador Bridge surpassed the Peace Bridge, which connects Buffalo, New York and Fort Erie, Ontario, as the busiest border crossing in North America

1992

Art Center Music School

The Art Center Music School is the oldest music school in Detroit, founded in 1922. It a community-based, non-profit, preparatory music school that offers low cost instruction to residents in the Detroit area. It is currently located at the corner of Alexandrine and Cass, formerly the home of the Hamilton Funeral Home

1933

Sport

The U.S. Postal Service released a first-class stamp recognizing the Brown Bomber, Joe Louis

1993

Young

Coleman A. Young, wrote an autobiography entitled "Hard Stuff"

1994

Archer

Dennis Archer became the mayor of the city of Detroit on January 3, 1994. Archer won Detroit's 1993 mayoral race by earning 57 percent of the vote against a strong candidate, Sharon McPhail, who had received Coleman A.Young's endorsement

1995

Health

UDM becomes a partner in the Greater Detroit Area Partnership for Training (GDAPFT) to increase the number of nurse practitioners, nurse midwives and physician assistants practicing in underserved communities

1995

Steinberg

The state of Michigan recognized Martha Jean "The Queen" Steinberg as "Michiganian of the Year"

1996

Michigan Opera Theater

The Michigan Opera Theater performed for the first time in the newly renovated Detroit Opera Theater

1996

Rosa Parks

Rosa Parks received the Presidential Metal of Freedom

1997

Hockey

On June 7, the Detroit Red Wings defeated the Philadelphia Flyers 2-1 to sweep the National Hockey League Stanley Cup Finals capturing the team's eighth (8) Stanley Cup Championship and ending a 42 year Stanley Cup Championship drought

1997

Museum of African American History

The Museum of African American History in Detroit, Michigan is dedicated to the preservation and presentation of African and African American history and culture. The world's largest Black historical and cultural museum. The museum encompasses 120,000 square feet, and include expanded exhibition galleries, an orientation theater, classrooms, multi-purpose rooms, a research library and museum store. It opened to the public on April 12, 1997

1997

Steinberg

Martha Jean "The Queen" Steinberg purchased WQBH Radio, (Queenís Broadcasting Corporation), and became one the first Black female radio owners in the country

1998

Free Press & Detroit News

On July 24, 1998 the Free Press Building ceased as the address for the Detroit Free Press, which had been its home since 1925. From that day forward the Detroit Free Press began sharing a building that is home to the Detroit News

1998

Hockey

On June 17, the Detroit Red Wings repeated as Stanley Cup Champions by defeating the Washington Capitals 4-1

1998

Implosion of the Downtown Hudson Store

On October 24, 1998 the J. L. Hudson store on Woodward in downtown Detroit was imploded

1998

Steinberg

Martha Jean "The Queen" Steinberg was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame's of distinguished radio personalities in 1998 and received "The Living Legends" Awards for those who have paved the way in the music industry as well as over 400 community service, media and state awards, including keys to various cities in the United States

1999

Baseball

On September 27, the Detroit Tigers played their last game at Tiger Stadium defeating the Kansas City Royals 8-2 and ending over 100 years of baseball play at the venerable location of Michigan and Trumbull affectionately referred to as "the Corner

1999

Free Press

Bob Talbert, a Detroit Free Press columnist for 31 years died

2000

Dumars

Detroit Pistons' owner William Davidson named Joe Dumars as president of the Pistons basketball operations. A six-time NBA All-Star, Dumars won two NBA Championship rings and he was named Most Valuable Player of the 1989 NBA Finals

2000

Baseball

On April 11, the Detroit Tigers defeated the Seattle Mariners 5-2 to open their new stadium, Comerica Park, marking the first time in more than 100 years that they have played a home game in a location other than Michigan and Trumbull

2000

Baseball

On July 23, Legendary Negro League star Norman "Turkey" Stearnes, of the Detroit Stars from the 1920's and early 1930's, was inducted into the Major League Baseball Hall of Fame

2000

Baseball

The Detroit Tigers honored Willie Horton by unveiling his statue to a crowd of 39,000 at Comerica Park on July 15, 2000. He was the first prominent local African American cultivated by the Tigers

2000

Matthews

Dave Matthews held the first concert at Comerica Park in downtown Detroit on July 5, 2000

2000

Free Press & Detroit News

On Sunday, December 17, 2000 the 5 1/2 year long labor dispute at the Detroit News and Detroit Free Press ended when the last of the six striking unions ratified new contracts

2000

Writer

Born in Detroit in 1923,Gloria Whelan, writer of novels and mysteries for young people, won the National Book Award in 2000 in the young people's literature category

N/A

Eastern Market

Eastern Market is the largest open-air wholesale/retail market of its kind in the United States.

N/A

Mail

Detroit is the only place in the country where ships can mail documents and receive mail all while sailing through

N/A

Woodward Dream Cruise

Largest one-day vintage car event in the world is the Woodward Dream Cruise

N/A

Catholic Archdiocese

The Detroit Catholic Archdiocese handles the most marriage annulments of any Catholic Community in the world

N/A

Cadieux Café

Cadieux Café has the only feather bowling lanes in the United States

N/A

Metro Airport

The 11,500 space packing garage at Metro Airport will be the largest in the world

N/A

Waterfall

Greek townís International Market placesí 114 feet waterfall is the tallest in the world

N/A

Electric Light

First electric light in a home was turned on for the wedding of Grace McMellon

N/A

Sport

Joe Louis Barrow, the Brown Bomber, dropped his last name so that his mother who abhorred violence would not know he was a fighter

N/A

Jesuits

Cadillac got into several rows with Jesuits, complaining that the priests were getting in his way with their anti-booze policy

Last update: 03/12/2001