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suhaswesi

Aka ea-luna v.3.0

 

 

This is an unnatural constructed language that suits my whims and fancies of the moment, an improvement on and expansion of the original ea-luna. Note the addition of 12 new consonants.

 

Things that start with phon-

 

Vowels

A /a/

E /e/ or /E/

I /i/ or /I/

U /u/

 

Consonants

L

T

N

B

D

R

P

W

M

K

G

H

S

Z

Sh /S/

Zh /Z/

Th /ž/

Dh /š/

Sw /sw/

Zw /zw/

F

V

Y

Unwritten glottal stop between vowels in certain circumstances (affixes, double vowels)

 

 

The syllable structure is V or CV.

 

(SEE THIS SPACE FOR ADDITIONAL DETAILS TO BE ADDED WHEN I FEEL LIKE IT)

 

Grammar ain’t just your ma’s ma no more…

 

Functional bits

 

Question marker = buna

            Where = bunaye

            When = bunaya

            Why (what reason) = bunapeta

            How many (what number) = bunaruli

 

            What/which thing, concrete object = bunadaba? (plural =  bunadabae?)

            Who (what/which person) = bunadenu? (plural = bunadenue?)

            How (what way/method) = Bunaseya?

 

            Buna can be combined with almost any word to make it into a question phrase:  

            When (what date) = buna ari?

What meaning? Buna wi?

           

 

           

 

Conjunctions

 

Prepositions

 

Other

Wa = of (containing – 2 litres OF water)

 

 

 

Verb bits

 

All grammatical particles attached to a verb come before it, in the order shown below:

 

(ma/bea/uma)(we)(ema/ide/rubi/ria)(zaku)(bade/punu/ate)

 

Ma

Imperative

Bea

Obedience (obaudive?)

Uma

‘might’ (doubt)

We

Negation

Ema

Past

Ide

Future

Rubi

Immediate past

Ria

Immediate future

Bade

Obligation (must, have to)

Punu

Conditional

Zaku

Habitual

Ate

‘able to’, ‘can’

 

Bea’ indicates that a person is responding cooperatively or obediently to a command, and is directed only toward people with authority over speaker.

Similar to ‘might’ in English, ‘uma’ indicates either doubt regarding the truth of a statement (“I think there are be 2 cookies left in the cookie jar” or “There might be 2 cookies left in the jar”), or a lack of commitment to an action (“I might go to the store later on if I feel like it”).

 

Theoretically, it is possible to use all available options (Uma we ema zaku bade litu nu – he might not have had to used to have danced) but I don’t think that will be very common. There are probably more elegant ways to phrase around such monstrosities.

 

These may stand on their own only in cases where the verb is understood:

 

--Buna litu nu? (‘Is he dancing?’)

-- Ema. (‘He was.’)

 

Pronouns

 

1st person singular= la

1st person plural = le

2nd person singular, informal = de

2nd person plural, informal = dhe

2nd person singular, formal = pa

2nd person plural, formal = pae

3rd person singular, epicene = li

3rd person plural, epicene= lie

3rd person singular, masculine = nu

3rd person plural, masculine = nue

3rd person singular, feminine = ki

3rd person plural, feminine = kie

3rd person singular, inanimate = ru

3rd person plural, inanimate = rue

 

Here it is again in a convenient table format:

 

Person

Singular

Plural

1st

la

le

2nd, normal

de

dhe

2nd, to authority

pa

pae

3rd, inanimate

ru

rue

3rd, m

nu

nue

3rd, f

ki

kie

3rd, epicene

li

lie

 

 

You would use ‘pa’ in talking to someone in authority over you, rather than being merely polite or formal.

 

 

 

Nouns

 

 

 

Affixes

 

A person who does V = -tae

A person who makes N = -gai

Device that does V = -zwa [eg dishwasher= plate+clean+zwa = kane+api+zwa= kaneapizwa]

Instrument used for V = -fe [eg leash = guide, lead + fe = tuki+fe = tukife]

Language of (nation/group) = si

Person of (nation/group) = ga

Offspring of = yu [eg, timi>timiyu, ‘cat’>’kitten’]

>V = ku-

>N = -nui

>Adj = -eya

>Adv = -enu

not-X (un, non) = ewe-

Becoming not x, removing x (de-) = thi

Opposite of X = zhu-

Opposed to X (anti, contra) = swu-

Supporting X (pro) = yua-