Past Postings

Previous William Thomas Sherman Info Page postings, quotes, observations, etc.
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MORE ALL AND SUNDRY

Those who are just must be kind.
~ Wisdom 12:19

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Fake news? What is there of virtually anything in culture and society these days that isn't phony or pretend (and, as well, an extremely high tolerance of the same?)

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I would think it frightening to work in Hollywood today. The films are so preoccupied and obsessed with non-stop, accentuated violence all the time that one can't but get the impression and infer that those making them are like that in real life.

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Oh I see how it is. These people CARE about something! (Hence we then are supposed to care about what they think.)

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A: Shouldn't we go to the authorities?

B: No, the authorities are afraid of them too.

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The devil will not always insist on a given evil, and if he thinks he manage what he thinks is a better bargain, will trade one evil for another.

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"Full many a flower is born to blush unseen." (Thos. Gray, "Elegy") Yet not always because it is actually absent, but because the observer, for one reason or other, is blind.

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"... this, or something akin to this, must be said to the multitude: 'Ye cannot have the same man as your ruler and your slave.' Since in this case also one certainly can apply the fable of the serpent whose tail rebelled against its head and demanded the right to lead in turn instead of always following; so it took the lead, and by the folly of its progress got itself into mischief and lacerated the head, which was compelled, contrary to nature, to follow a part that had neither eyes nor ears. This, as we see, has been the experience of many of the men whose whole political activity is directed towards the winning of popular favour; they made themselves dependent on the multitude, which is borne about at random, and then could neither recover themselves nor put a stop to the progress of disorder."
~ Plutarch, "Agis," ch. 2.

(From which we might conclude: Those who stubbornly rely and insist on popular favor for their success invariably become its slave.)

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As much or learned as anyone is the world and the universe are always going to be much bigger. Our confidence and our surety rests in our faith in God the creator and that he is good. Without this what final judge can we look to for comfort or hope? Who else can or will validate, the moral, the good, and the beautiful?

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You ought not trust someone who cannot be trusted and dogged and implacable secrecy is a sure sign of such.

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You need God to give those you love the things they need but which you can't give them

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Legally speaking? Legally speaking he is not supposed to torture anyone. But since he can intimidate and or own the lawyers and judges the law will not help us.

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Is man tyrannical to the animals? Yes, they say but this is all right because God loves us so.

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Since God-birthed Nature (in its various manifestations) cleans itself, it is only right and fitting that religion do the same.

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Everything is infinitely divisible. Logic tells us this. But we do not think so because we only believe our eyes.

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[ch. 68]
But, as it helped his purpose, he compares the (miracles) related of Jesus to the results produced by magic. There would indeed be a resemblance between them, if Jesus, like the dealers in magical arts, had performed His works only for show; but now there is not a single juggler who, by means of his proceedings, invites his spectators to reform their manners, or trains those to the fear of God who are amazed at what they see, nor who tries to persuade them so to live as men who are to be justified by God. And jugglers do none of these things, because they have neither the power nor the will, nor any desire to busy themselves about the reformation of men, inasmuch as their own lives are full of the grossest and most notorious sins.
~ Origen (c. 184-c. 253), Contra Celsus, Book I

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[ch. 64]
But if we were to reproach those who have been converted with their former lives, then we would have occasion to accuse Phædo also, even after he became a philosopher; since, as the history relates, he was drawn away by Socrates from a house of bad fame to the pursuits of philosophy. Nay, even the licentious life of Polemo, the successor of Xenocrates, will be a subject of reproach to philosophy; whereas even in these instances we ought to regard it as a ground of praise, that reasoning was enabled, by the persuasive power of these men, to convert from the practice of such vices those who had been formerly entangled by them. Now among the Greeks there was only one Phædo, I know not if there were a second, and one Polemo, who betook themselves to philosophy, after a licentious and most wicked life; while with Jesus there were not only at the time we speak of, the twelve disciples, but many more at all times, who, becoming a band of temperate men, speak in the following terms of their former lives: “For we ourselves also were sometimes foolish, disobedient, deceived, serving various lusts and pleasures, living in malice and envy, hateful, and hating one another. But after that the kindness and love of God our Saviour towards man appeared, by the washing of regeneration, and renewing of the Holy Ghost, which He shed upon us richly,” we became such as we are. For “God sent forth His Word and healed them, and delivered them from their destructions,” as the prophet taught in the book of Psalms...
Athe assailants of Christianity do not see in how many persons the passions have been brought under restraint, and the flood of wickedness checked, and savage manners softened, by means of the Gospel. So that it well became those who are ever boasting of their zeal for the public good, to make a public acknowledgement of their thanks to that doctrine which by a new method led men to abandon many vices, and to bear their testimony at least to it, that even though not the truth, it has at all events been productive of benefit to the human race.
~ Origen (c. 184-c. 253), Contra Celsus, Book I

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[ch. 62]
Nay, I am of opinion that if Jesus had selected some individuals who were wise according to the apprehension of the multitude, and who were fitted both to think and speak so as to please them, and had used such as the ministers of His doctrine, He would most justly have been suspected of employing artifices, like those philosophers who are the leaders of certain sects, and consequently the promise respecting the divinity of His doctrine would not have manifested itself; for had the doctrine and the preaching consisted in the persuasive utterance and arrangement of words, then faith also, like that of the philosophers of the world in their opinions, would have been through the wisdom of men, and not through the power of God. Now, who is there on seeing fishermen and tax-gatherers, who had not acquired even the merest elements of learning (as the Gospel relates of them, and in respect to which Celsus believes that they speak the truth, inasmuch as it is their own ignorance which they record), discoursing boldly not only among the Jews of faith in Jesus, but also preaching Him with success among other nations, would not inquire whence they derived this power of persuasion, as theirs was certainly not the common method followed by the multitude? And who would not say that the promise, “Follow Me, and I will make you fishers of men,” had been accomplished by Jesus in the history of His apostles by a sort of divine power?
~ Origen (c. 184-c. 253), Contra Celsus, Book I

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[ch. 57]
But, according to the Jew of Celsus, “countless individuals will convict Jesus of falsehood, alleging that those predictions which were spoken of him were intended of them.” We are not aware, indeed, whether Celsus knew of any who, after coming into this world, and having desired to act as Jesus did, declared themselves to be also the “sons of God,” or the “power” of God. But since it is in the spirit of truth that we examine each passage, we shall mention that there was a certain Theudas among the Jews before the birth of Christ, who gave himself out as some great one, after whose death his deluded followers were completely dispersed. And after him, in the days of the census, when Jesus appears to have been born, one Judas, a Galilean, gathered around him many of the Jewish people, saying he was a wise man, and a teacher of certain new doctrines. And when he also had paid the penalty of his rebellion, his doctrine was overturned, having taken hold of very few persons indeed, and these of the very humblest condition. And after the times of Jesus, Dositheus the Samaritan also wished to persuade the Samaritans that he was the Christ predicted by Moses; and he appears to have gained over some to his views. But it is not absurd, in quoting the extremely wise observation of that Gamaliel named in the book of Acts, to show how those persons above mentioned were strangers to the promise, being neither “sons of God” nor “powers” of God, whereas Christ Jesus was truly the Son of God. Now Gamaliel, in the passage referred to, said: “If this counsel or this work be of men, it will come to nought” (as also did the designs of those men already mentioned after their death); “but if it be of God, you cannot overthrow this doctrine, lest haply you be found even to fight against God.” There was also Simon the Samaritan magician, who wished to draw away certain by his magical arts. And on that occasion he was successful; but now-a-days it is impossible to find, I suppose, thirty of his followers in the entire world, and probably I have even overstated the number. There are exceedingly few in Palestine; while in the rest of the world, through which he desired to spread the glory of his name, you find it nowhere mentioned. And where it is found, it is found quoted from the Acts of the Apostles; so that it is to Christians that he owes this mention of himself, the unmistakeable result having proved that Simon was in no respect divine.
~ Origen (c. 184-c. 253), Contra Celsus, Book I

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