Esther

Her Name: May derive from "Isthar," the Babylonian goddess of love, or from the Persian word for "star." Her Hebrew name, "Hadassah," means "myrtle."

Her Character: An orphan in a foreign land, she displayed great courage in the midst of a crisis. Prior to risking her life for her people, she humbled herself by fasting, and then put her considerable beauty, social grace, and wisdom in the service of God’s plan.

Her Sorrow: The learn that her husband, the king, had unwittingly placed her life and the life of her people in jeopardy.

Her Joy: To watch mourning turn to celebration once the Jews enjoyed relief from their enemies.

Key Scripture: Esther 1-10

Vasti, queen of Persia, was the most powerful woman in the Middle East, yet her power was as fragile as a candle in a storm. Her husband, Xerxes, had just summoned her to appear before a festive gathering of his nobles. Vasti, however, had no intention of parading herself like a prized cow in front of a herd of drunken men and refused.

What should be done to punish her insolence? One of the king’s counselors spoke for all: Queen Vasti has done wrong, not only against the king but also against all the nobles and the peoples of all the provinces of King Xerxes. For the queen’s conduct will become known to all women, and so they will despise their husbands and say, "King Xerxes commanded Queen Vasti to be brought before him , but she would not come." There will be no end of disrespect and discord.

So poor Vasti bore the brunt of every man’s fears. She who had refused the royal summons was forever banished from the royal presence, and a great domestic uprising was squelched before it began.

After a while, a search was conducted for a new queen to replace Vashti. It so happened that many Jews were living in Persia at the time. Exiled from Judah a hundred years earlier (after Jerusalem’s fall in 587 B.C.), they had been deported to Babylon, which in turn was conquered by Persia. Mordecai and his orphaned cousin Esther were among those living in exile, 650 miles northeast of Jerusalem.

Like many young virgins, the beautiful Esther was gathered into the king’s harem. To refuse the privilege may well have meant her death. Counseled by Mordacai to keep her Jewish origins a secret, she spent the next twelve months awaiting her tryst with the king. When the moment came, Esther so pleases Xerxes that she became queen in Vasti’s place.

Some time later, an Amalekite named Haman rose to power in Persia. Haman was so highly placed that other officials knelt before him as a sign of respect. One man, however, the Jew Mordecai, refused to kneel. Haman became so angry that he decided to eliminate every Jew in the kingdom.

To ascertain the most favorable moment for destroying them, Haman piously consulted his gods by casting lots (or pur). A date eleven months into the future was revealed. Haman immediately persuaded Xerxes to issue a decree that all Jews in his realm were to be slaughtered on that day. By way of incentive, the decree proclaimed that anyone who killed a Jew could plunder his possessions.

Mordecai reacted immediately by contacting Esther and asking her to beg Xerxes for mercy. But Esther was afraid and replied, "For any man or woman who approaches the king in the inner court without being summoned the king has but one law: that he be put to death. The only exception to this is for the king to extend the gold scepter to him and spare his life. But thirty days have passed since I was called to go to the king."

Mordecai replied, "Do not think that because you are in the king’s house you alone of all the Jews will escape. For if you remain silent at this time, relief and deliverance for the Jews will arise from another place, but you and your father’s family will perish. And who knows but that you have come to royal position for such a time as this?"

So Esther instructed Mordecai, "Go, gather together all the Jews who are in Susa, and fast for me. Do not eat or drink for three days, night or day. I and my maids will fast as you do. When this is done, I will go to the king, even though it is against the law. And if I perish, I perish."

On the third day, Esther approached the king. As soon as Xerxes saw her, he held out the golden scepter. "What is it, Queen Esther?" he asked. "What is your request? Even up to half the kingdom, it will be given to you."

But Esther merely invited the king and Haman to join her that evening for a banquet she had prepared especially for them. That evening the king again pressed her to ask for whatever she desired, but Esther simply invited the king and Haman to another banquet, to be held the following night. That evening, on his way home, Haman caught sight of mordecai, sitting smugly rather than kneeling as he passed by. Haman was outraged, but his wife consoled him by proposing an evil scheme—he need merely build a gallows and then ask the king to hang Mordecai on it the next morning.

While Haman was happily constructing a gallows for his enemy, the king was pacing the royal bedroom. Unable to sleep, he ordered one of his servants to read from annals of the kingdom. That evening’s reading just happened to be about how Mordecai had once saved the king’s life by warning of a plot against him. It struck the king that Mordecai had never been properly rewarded for his loyalty.

So the next morning the king asked Haman, "What should be done for the man the king delights to honor?"

Assuming the king intended to reward him in some new and marvelous way, the foolish Haman replied with a grandiose suggestion: "For the man the king delights to honor, have them bring a royal robe the king has worn and a horse the king has ridden. Then let one of the king’s most noble princes robe the man and lead him on the horse through the city streets, proclaiming before him, ‘This is what is done for the man the king delights to honor!’"

"Go at once," the king commanded him. "Get the robe and the horse and do just as you have suggested for Mordecai the Jew."

The man who had planned to bury his enemy was suddenly forced to exalt him that very day!

That night, as the king and Haman were once again drinking wine at the queen’s banquet, the king implored Esther to ask for whatever her heart desired. This time she spoke without hesitation: "If I have found favor with, O king, and if it pleases your majesty, grant me my life—this is my petition. And spare my people—this is my request. For I and my people have been sold for destruction and slaughter and annihilation."

"Where is the man who has dared to do such a thing?" the king demanded.

"The adversary and enemy is this vile Haman."

And so Haman’s star, which had risen to so great a height, fell suddenly, like a bolt of lightning crashing from the sky. He was hanged on the very same gallows he had built for the Jew Mordecai, and all his property was given to Esther. Futhermore, the king, because he could not revoke one of his own edicts, issued another to counteract the first one. It gave Jews throughout the empire the right to protect themselves, to destroy and plunder every enemy who might raise a hand against them.

As news of the king’s edict spread, many people from various nationalities became so terrified that they claimed to be Jews themselves. The very day Haman’s gods had revealed as a day of reckoning for the Jews became a day of reckoning for their enemies. Ever after, the Jews commemorated these events with the Feast of Purim. As the book of Esther says, these days were celebrated "as the time when the Jews got relief from their enemies, and as the month when their sorrow was turned into joy and their mourning into a day of celebration."

Subject to foreign powers after the Exile, God’s people must have felt among the weakest elements of society. But weaker even than a Jewish man exiled to a foreign land was a Jewish woman. And weakest of all would have been a young orphan girl of Jewish descent. God had once again employed one of His favorite methods for accomplishing His purposes: He had raised the weakest of the weak, placing her in a position of immense strategic importance.

But it had been up to Esther to decide whether she would play the part God offered. Like Moses, she chose to identify with God’s people even if it meant risking her life to do so. And even though exile was a punishment for Israel’s long unfaithfulness, God showed that He was still with His people, delivering and protecting them in surprising ways, turning the table on their enemies through a series of stunning reversals. Earthly powers were at work to kill and destroy, but a heavenly power, far greater in scope, was at work to save and preserve.

Reflect On: Esther 5-8

Praise God: That He turns the wisdom and the power of the world on its head, often using the most surprising tactics to accomplish His plan.

Offer Thanks: That God has an important purpose for your life.

Confess: Any tendency to view your life in isolation from God’s people, to shrink back from some step of faith God may be calling you to take.

Ask God: For the grace to act courageously and wisely.

Lift Your Heart

Many Jewish girls celebrate the Feast of Purim by dressing up as Queen Esther. One way we can emulate her today is by fasting. Before Esther took action, she employed a time—honored spiritual discipline to expose her need before God. Fasting was a visible sign of her dependency and weakness, an eloquent form of begging God’s help. This week, do a little eloquent begging yourself by choosing a day to fast from breakfast to lunch—dinner, too, if you’re brave! Drink only water or fruit juice. Perhaps you have a particular need or problem you would like to surrender to God. Tell God that you need Him more than you need food. Don’t try to manipulate Him by your self-sacrifice, but simply allow your weakness to emerge in His presence.

Lord, I need You so much more than food or water. Without Your presence, Your protection, Your wisdom, Your gift of faith, I would be lost. I’m hungry for You alone. Hear my prayer and give me everything I need to do Your will. Use me in the church and the world around me to accomplish your purpose.

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