Perennial, Biennial, and Annual Herbs Used Universally

Learn where the plants we call herbs originate from; the most hardy species, how to germinate the seed for them, how and when to harvest your hard work. Herbs traditionally used in every day cooking, herbal medicine...
and, yes. whitchcraft, and voodoo....

PS: Sorry about the size of this file; I am working on making an index for it!!!

Breath" (FYI). Not so bad if they're cooked. If you're in
one of those states in late spring, look for Ramp Suppers;
very popular as fund raisers. Ramps cooked with potatoes are
great!

Allium cepa, Cepa Group (Onion, Vegatable)

Both onion and tame leek are included here because even
though onion is a bulb, and onion can be started from a set, both can be started from seed.

Allium sativaum, (Garlic), is listed next as a bulb,
and information provided there is valid for onion sets as
well.


Amaryllidaceae, (chives) Native to Europe and Asia--Hardy
zone 3-9... Tame leeks are native to Europe, North Africa
and Asia, while onions are known only in cultivation.


HABIT: Bulbous perennial plants grow 8-12" high in
neat, close tufts of slender, tulular grass-like leaves and
small globular heads of pale purple flowers in early summer.
Leaves have a delicate onion flavor. Leeks are grown for the
mild flavored stems and base. Onions; grown for the edible
enlarged bulbous portion which may be white, red or yellow.


GERMINATION: Sow outdoors in spring as soon as soil
can be worked, or sow indoors, maintaining a temperature
within the medium of 60-70 degrees duting germination which
takes 10-14 days. Onion and leek may be sown outdoors in the
fall, but leeks have a longer growing season and should be
started indoors in late winter in mountain or northerN
regions. Previous tips apply.


CULTURE: Leeks: Plant in sun or light sun, 6" apart,
in a rich, moist, well drained soil. Clumps may be lifted in
the fall and grown indoors during winter in a sunny
windowsill.

Leeks and Onions: Grow in full sun in a light, fertile,
deeply prepared, rich soil. Water regularly and feed using a
fetilizer high in phosphorus and potash, feed again in mid
summer.


HARVESTING: Leeks, snip leaves for flavoring at any
time.


Harvest scallions (green under-developed onions) when the
bulbs are an inch across or less. Harvest "bunching onions" (Allium fistulosm), which do not develop bulbs, at any time you
wish. When the tops of the onions begin to bend over, pin
them to the ground to hasten maturity and pull in 2-3 days.
Allow to dry before storing. Leeks may be harvested in fall
when mature; hilling soil against thier "stems" when fairly
mature produces long, white "stems".


**NOTE: "Top" or "tree" onions in contrast to the "bunching
onions", do not produce seed but are raised from small
onions borne in clusters at the top of the stem (sets).
These are planted in the fall and will come up in the
spring.



Onions Species Used for Decoratve Purposes

Some of the Allium Genus are very decorative in the garden and quite easy to grow in almost any soil.


  • Allium albopilosum: 8 inch diameter, of star-shaped
    lilac-colored flowers.
  • A. beesianum: clear blue flowers
  • A. gigantum: grows 4-5 feet high, colossal heads of
    rosy-violet flowers.

There is a rather extensive list of Allium, with flowers ranging from bright yellows to reds and whites, and leaves pink, or broad leaf, giants and dwarfs!



The Allium considered the premier herb.

Allium sativum (Garlic)

Plant sets in light soil 9 in. apart in spring.
Bulbs normally like a good well drained loam.



Anethum graveolens (Dill) Annual Herb

Dill, Bouquet. A drwarf version of above.

Dill, Fernleaf. A dwarf with dark green, finely devided
leaves, with an extended cutting season (more herb to harvest!).

Umbelliferae, Native to southwest Asia.


HABIT: Plants 2-3 feet tall have finely divided, light green
foliage and bear flat topped clusters of tiny yellow flowers in
mid-summer. The flowers produce small flat seeds used for flavoring and
pickling.


GERMINATION: Sow outdoors where plants are to grow in early
spring, or sow indoors, maintaining a temperature within the medium of
60-70 degrees during germination which takes 21-25 days. Sow in
individual pots or transplant carefully, as dill resents being disturbed
(use a peat pot if you can). Do not cover the seeds which need light to
germinate.


CULTURE: Plant 8-12" apart in full sun and well drained, average
garden soil, which should be slightly acid. Keep well watered.


HARVESTING: Pick leaves at any time for fresh use or drying.
Harvest the seeds when they turn brown or place the stalks upside down
in a bag to collect the seeds as they ripen.




Angelica archangelica (Angelica) Biennial Herb

Umbelliferae, Native to Europe and Asia

HABIT: This aromatic herb grows 5' high with large, 3-part, compound
leaves and rounded umbels of greenish-white flowers appering in July.


GERMINATION: Sow outdorrs in late fall for spring germination, or
sow indoors after placing in the refrigerator for 6-8 weeks, followed by
germination at 60-70 degrees within the medium which takes 21-25 days.
Seeds are not long lived and should not be stored.


CULTURE: Plant in sun or light shade, 3' apart, in a rich,
fertile, well drained soil. It does best in moist soil and a cool
climate.


HARVESTING: Cut leaves at any time for flavoring or use as a
vegetable. For candied stems, cut the stalks in the second year just
before the flowers begin to open. Angelica is a botanical escape, and is
found growing wild in many different parts of the U.S., but, if
you harvest in the wild, be warned it has several look a
likes in the Hemlock Genus. In herbal medice Angelica is
used for stomach difficulties, but should not be eaten or used as an
herb if diabetic or pregnant.




Anthriscus cerefolium (Chervil) Annual Herb

Umbeliiferae, Native to southeast Europe and western Asia.


HABIT: A dainty 12-18" plant that has finely cut and richly
aromatic soft, light green leaves surrounding flower stalks which bear
tiny white flowers in flat umbels in may. Leaves have a slight licorice
flavor and are often used in place of parsley.


GERMINATION: Sow outdoors in early spring or sow indoors,
maintaining a temperature within the medium of 60-70 degrees during
germination which takes 7-14 days. Sow indoors in individual peat pots,
or move very carfully as Chervil resents transplanting.


CULTURE: Plant in part shade or shade, 8" apart, in rich, well
drained sandy soil. Chervil may be grown indorrs in full sun, 55 degree
nights and with a medium kept evenly moist. Outdoors Chervil prefers
cool climates.


HARVESTING: Cut leaves at any time for fresh use and just before
flowers open for drying or freezing.




Artemisia absinthium (Wormwood, Absinthe)

Perennial, Compositae, Native to Europe------Hardy zone
3-9


HABIT: Coarse, white, hairy, deeply divided leaves
cover 4
foot tall plants. The yellow to purple flowers on long wiry branches
are tiny and insignificant.


GERMINATION: Sow in place outdoors in spring;
germination will
take 7-10 days.


CULTURE: Plant in full sun or light shade, 18" apart,
in
average garden soil with excellent drainage. Artemisia can
tolerate dry, poor soil. Prune back to keep in an attractive
shape.


Harvesting: Cut fresh leaves at any time to flavor vermouth or
poultry dishes; cut leaves for drying as soon as the flowers appear.

**NOTE: Caution should be used when using this herb!
In
traditional herbal medicine it is used in teas as a
stomch medicine, but excessive use of the plant can cause
poisoning. Used with moderation, (as in a flavor,...) there
is little to no danger. However, Wormwood oil is a strong
poison, but is usually used externally to improve blood
circulation, and and as a local anesthetic, and too, is used
in the Witch's Brew called The"Dark Huntress Oil"
***SEE Herbs used in Witch Craft and Rituals section of the
main page.


Artemisia dracunculus (Siberian Tarragon,
Russian
Tarragon)


Perennial, Compositae, native to southern Europe, Asia,
wetern U.S. -----------------Hardy zone 4-7


HABIT: A woody 3-5 foot plant that has lance like,
dark green leaves that are mint/anise-flavored, good for
meats and vinaigrette. The flowers are inconspicuous,
greenish-white and in clusters. This is not to be confused
with French Tarragon which does not set seeds and must be
propagated by cuttings.


GERMINATION: Sow outdoors in spring or sow indoors,
maintaining a temperature within the medium of 60-70 degrees
during germination which takes 20-25 days.


CULTURE: Plant 18" apart in full sun or light shade in a light,
well drained soil. Fertilize in early spring and again in early
summer.


Harvesting: Cut leaves at any time for fresh use; for
drying, cut just before flowers open.



Borage officinalis, (Borage) Annual Herb

Boraginacae, Native to Europe and North Africa


HABIT: This decorative plant has drooping clusters of 1 1/2" blue
or purple star shaped flowers in summer on 2' stems clothed with hairy,
coarse leaves. It is a good source of bee forage.


GERMINATION: Sow outdoors in fall or very early spring, covering
the seed completely, as it needs darknes to germinate. It is best sown
in place, as it is very difficult to transplant. Germination takes 7-10
days.


CULTURE: Plant 10-12" apart in full sun or light shade in dry,
poor soil.


HARVESTING: Immature leaves are tender and are used in iced drinks
and salads. Flowers may be cut as they start to open, floated on drinks
or used candied on cakes...




H1 EM {colored:red}

Special Mixtures Of Herbs


Fines herbs is a cooking term indicating basil, chervil, chives,
parsley, tarragon and thyme, finely chopped.


Bouquet garni is a bunch of herbs- usually parsely, thyme, bay,
tarragon and sometimes margoram- tied with thread and added to stock or
water during cooking. Dried herbs may be tied in a small piece of
muslin. Remove the herbs the herbs before serving.


Tisanes is an old fashioned term for herbal tea.


Witloof another old fashioned term for a winter grow salad. Witloof chicory is grown for its roots; it provides greens in the
winter. The seed is sown in the spring, and the plants spaced 6-8 in.
apart. In the autumn the roots are lifted and planted in a box or bed of
moist soil in a warm cellar. If the soil is watered occasionally, the
heads of white leaves will be ready for the table in a few weeks; the
roots are of no further used. Discard after growing as they've expended
too much energy.


Frech Endive can be forced the same as above from roots developed
from seed sown in May, but, rubarb, is a tasty midwinter luxury
and is easilly forced. dug from the outdoor garden in the late fall,
strong roots are put in bushel baskets or vegetable crates and covered
with leaves. They are placed outdoors in the shade or in a cold frame,
then allowed to freeze and become thoroughly dormant. They may be
brought into the greenhouse in succsesive batches after the first of the
year. Kept under the benches and shaded, the stalks will be far superior
in taste and tenderness to the outdoor crop... Rhubarb, sometimes known
as pie plant, is mostly grown for its large , thick, acid leafstalks,
which are popular for tangy pies and sauce. The leaves are poisonous and
should not be eaten. Rhubarb Root is used as a mild laxative
tonic in herbal medicine. Chewing the root stimulates the digestive
glands.





Capparis spinosa, (Caper Bush) Annual Herb

Capparacae, Native to the Mediteranean


HABIT: Caper Bush is a spiny, shrubby plant growing 3-5' high,
with 2" round leaves and 2-3" flowers.


GERMINATION: Sow indoors in late winter, maintaining a temperature
within the medium of 55 degree nights and 85 degree days, during
germination wich takes 3 months.


CULTURE: Grow 3' apart in full sun in a sandy, well drained soil.
Caper Bush does well in rocky soil and tolerates drought.


HARVESTING: For pickling, pick flower buds before they open.



Carthemus tinctorius, (Safflower, False Saffron) Annual Herb

Compositae, Native to Eurasia


HABIT: The 3' plant 2-2 1/2" thistle-like leaves studded with
short, prickly orange hairs and thistle-like flowers of deep yellow to
orange. White seeds that resemble teeth are stained with brown and
follow the flowers.


GEREMINATION: Sow outdoors where plants are to grow after all
danger of frost has past, or, for best results, sow indoors 8 weeks
before last frost, maintaining a temperature within the medium of 65-70
degrees during germination which takes 10-14 days.


CULTURE: Plant 12" apart in full sun and a well drained, average
garden soil. Safflower tolerates poor and dry soil but does best when
kept moderately moist.


HARVESTING: Pick fresh flowers to use as a natural dye; collect
seed for flavoring. The flavor is almost identical to saffron.

Real Saffron is the collected pollen from Crocus sativus.
The main use of Saffron is for culinary purposes. It is one of the
world's most expensive spices. In herbal medicine it is used for coughs,
and stomach disorders. High doses are poisonous! A chemical found in it
acts on the central nervous system and damages the kidneys, a dose of
10-12 grams can be fatal. On the other hand, 12 grams of Saffron
sells for around $57.00, which is a little less than a third of an
ounce.



Carum carvi, (Caraway) Biennial Herb

Umbelliferae, Native to Europe


HABIT: Mounded plants are clothed with finely cut, dark green
leaves which are practically evergreen. Flower stalks 2' high are topped
with clusters of tiny white flowers in JUne and July, followed by brown
anise flavored seeds.


GERMINATION: Since Carraway is difficult to transplant, it is best
sown in place. Sow in the fall to have seeds by the following summer;
seeds sown in spring will not grow into seed-producing plants until the
second summer. Germination takes 10-14 days.


CULTURE: Plant 10-12" apart in full sun and a well drained garden
soil.


HARVESTING: Harvest seeds when they turn brown in midsummer.



Coriandrum sativum, (Coriander, also being called Cilantro,
Cilantro Santo)-------------------Annual Herb

Umbelliferae, Native to southern Europe


HABIT: Large, coarse plants have finely divided, soft green leaves
and 12-30" stems topped with clusters of tiny white or pink flowers in
late summer. Lemon flavored white seeds that resemble peppercorns follow
the flowers.


GERMINATION: For best results, sow in early spring, completely
covering the seeds which need darkness to germinate. Germination takes
10-14 days.


CULTURE: Plant 8-10" apart in full sun and average garden soil
with good drainage.


HARVESTING: Pick leaves at anytime for salad. When the seeds begin
to turn brown, cut stem and place it upside down in a paper bag to
collect the seeds. The seeds are used in confections and pickling, new
leaves in Mexican and Asian cooking.



Cumminum cyminum, (Cumin) Annual Herb

Compositae, Native to the Mediterranean


HABIT: This spreading plant grows 6" high and has thread-like
leaves and umbels of tiny white or rose colored flowers followed by
flavorful seeds.


GERMINATION: Plant outdoors in spring after all danger of frost has past, or start seeds indoors 6-8 weeks before last frost, maintaining a temperature withing the medium of 70 degrees during germination which takes 10-14 days.


CULTURE: Plant 2' apart in full sun and average, well drained
soil. Cumin prefers a mild climate and needs a long growing season.


HARVESTING: Harvest when seeds begin to dry; the stems may be cut
and placed upside down in a large bag to collect the seeds.



Eruca vesicaria; Subspecies: sativa (Rocket) Annual Herb

Cruciferae, Native to the Medterranean


HABIT: This herb is grown as a salad plant for its strong peppery
tasting foliage (much like Nasturtium leaves). It grows quickly to 2
1/2' and has flowers of white with purple veins.


GERMINATION: Sow outdoors in early spring as soon as the soil can
be worked, or sow indoors, maintaining a temperature within the medium
of 60-70 degrees during germination which takes 5-8 days.


CULTURE: Plant 12" apart in full sun, and in a light, sandy, rich
and moist well drained soil. Rocket does best in cool weather.


HARVESTING: Cut leaves frequently to keep them from becoming
bitter.



Foeniculum vulgare,

Foeniculum vulgare variety: azoricum, (Florence Fennel, or Sweet
Fennel)

Umbelliferae, Native to southern Europe


HABIT: Fennel is a 4-5' herb with thread-like, bright yellow-green
foliage, similar to dill, but coarser. The stems bear flat yellow umbels
of flowers in summer, which are followed by light tan ribbed seeds.
Florence Fennel, also known asFinocchio or anis, is a smaller version
growing to only 2'; the root of which is used as a vegetable, and the
anise flavored "bulbous" root is delicious raw or cooked.


GERMINATION: Sow Fennel outdoors after all danger of from frost
has past, or sow indoors, maintaining a temperature within the medium of
65 degrees during germination which takes 10-14 days. Cover the large
sweet pepper sized seed, as darkness will faciliate germination. It is
best to sow in individual peat pots as Fennel resents transplanting.
Sweet Fennel is best treated as a fall crop.


CULTURE: Plant in full sun, 8-12" apart, in a dry, rich-limey soil
that is well drained.


HARVESTING: Cut leaves from either species while in bloom. Seeds
can be harvested from both species when they begin to turn brown. The
heavier stalks of Sweet Fennel can be blanched by pileing soil around
them for 2-3 weeks, followed by harvesting before the flowers open.
Stalks can be eaten like the root.



Hyssopus oficinalis, (Hyssop) Perennial

Labiatae, Native to the south and eastern parts of Europe


HABIT: This one and a half foot plant can be a shrubby evergreen
in the right climate. It has aromatic dark green leaves. Small
blueish-purple flowers borne in spikes like a mint plant, blooming in
June.


GERMINATION: Sow outdoors where the plants are to reside in early
spring, or sow indoors, maintaining a temperature within the medium of
60-70 degrees during germination which takes 7-10 days. If started
early, Hyssop will flower the first year.


CULTURE: Plant 18" apart in full sun or light shade in an average,
well drained garden soil. Hyssop like the soil slightly alkaline and
does well in dry and rocky places.


HARVESTING: Pick leaves at any time for drying and use in scents.
It has both culinary and medicinal uses. Medicinally it is used for
respiratory problems.



Lavandula angustifolia, subspecies angustifolia (Lavender)
Perennial Herb: Several of the subspecies; L. Vera(English), Hidcote
strain, brighter flowers,taller and stronger, Lavender Lady, a uniform
dwarf that flowers earlier, and the Munstead strain has a mounded bushy
habit.

Labiatae, Native to the Mediterranean


HABIT: Lavender is an aromatic, deciduous to semi-evergreen perennial, with many branched blue-violet flowers in whorled clusters opening in early summer. Foliage is blue grey to blueish green. The various strains grow to a hieght ranging from 8" to near two feet, with
Lavender Lady being the earliest to bloom.


GERMINATION: Several of the strains have a spotty germination, even with stratification (cooling period). Sow outdoors in the late fall or early spring. Indoors, place seed in the freezer for several days or place in moistened medium in the refrigerator for 4-6 weeks (stratification), followed by germination at a temperature of 70 degrees which takes 15-20 days.


CULTURE: Plant 12" apart in full sun in a lime rich, well drained
soil. Prune back after flowering to keep plants compact.


HARVESTING: Cut flower spikes as the buds begin to open and dry for use in lavender bags. It can be used to make lavender water for its pleasant scent, or as a moth repellant. Use as potpouri, or candy theflowers for various culinary uses.



Levisticum officiale (Lovage) Perennial)

Umbelliferae, Native to southern Europe

HABIT: Mounded, tropical looking plants grow 2-3' tall with celery flavored leaves and hollow stalks up to 6' which carry clusters of small greenish-yellow flowers followed by light tan, aromatic seeds.


GERMINATION: Sow outdoors in fall or indoors in early spring, maintaining a temperature within the medium of 60-70 degrees during germination which takes 10-14 days.


CULTURE: Plant 30-36" apart in full sun or part shade in rich, moist garden loam.


HARVESTING: Cut leaves at any time for fresh use. For dried leaves, cut stems above thew second set of leaves and hang upside down. Seeds may be collected for use as flavorings. Cut fresh stalks and substitute for celery.



Matricaria recutita (Chamomile, German Chamomile) Annual

Compositae, Native to Europe and west Asia

Chamaemelum nobile (Roman Chamomile) Perennial

HABIT: This sweet-scented, many branched plant grows 2-2 1/2' (Roman 8") high and has finely cut leaves and daisy like flowers with yellow discs and white rays (petals).


GERMINATION: Sow where plants are to grow outdoors in early spring (Roman: treat as a perennial-sow in fall if you like) as soon as soil can be worked, or sow indoors, maintaining a temperature within the medium of 55 degrees during germination which takes 10-14 days.


CULTURE: Plant 6-12" (half of that for Roman) apart in full sun and a dry, light, sandy well drained soil.


HARVESTING: Cut foliage for scenting purposes at any time; cut dried flower heads for tea. "I personally think fresh flowers from the Roman Chamomile has a slight apple flavor and are good to add to salads,and...



ALL OF THE MINTS ARE GROUPED HERE UNDER ONE SET OF GROWING TIPS, WITH NO DESCRITION (HABIT), as they are all of the Labiatae family. ALL ARE PERENNIALS>

Marrbium vulgare (Horehound)

Melissa offcinalis (Balm, Bee Balm, Lemon Balm)

MENTHA species (Mints)

Nepta species (Catmint)

GERMINATION: All of the mints are easy, sow outdoors anytime from early spring, up to two months before frost, or sow as soon as the soil can be worked. The mints can be sow indoors, maintaining a temperature within the medium of 60-70 degrees during germination which takes 7-10 days.


CULTURE: Plant 6-15" apart in full sun and almost any well drained soil, (though Mountain mint likes it wet, and all can be found growing in roadside ditches). Nepta thrives in hot, poor, dry, sandy soils. To encourage a second bloom, cut flower stalks back to the foliage after the first flowers have faded. Most of the mints and especially Lemon Balm gets rather ugly after they bloom. Best sugestion is to cut them back hard, none will suffer and will look great when they grow back. A real plus is hanging them in bunches to dry, your house will never smell better, and winter time will be warmer with the hot teas they'll make!


HAREVESTING: Cut any time!



Ocimum basilicum (Basil) Annual

Labiatae, Native to the Old World tropics

CURRENTLY there are 15 seperate species available (seed) from Park Seed:
Basil; cinnamon, dark opal, dwarf bush, green bush, holy, large leaf italian, lemon, lemon sweet dani, licorice, minette, minimum, osmin, purple ruffles, thai siam queen, and basil valentino.


HABIT: These plants grow in size ranges of 6'' to over 24" with varying colors, scents and flavors.


GERMINATION: Sow outdoors where the plants are to grow after all danger of frost has past, or better, start indoors 6-8 weeks before last frost, maintaining a temperature within the medium, of 70 degrees during germination which takes 7-10 days.


CULTURE: Plant 6-12" apart , depending on whether the species is a dwarf or a larger variety, in full sun and a dry, light, medium rich, well drained soil. Basil may also be grown indoors in a sunny window.


HARVESTING: Cut and use any time.



Origanum majorana (Marjoram, Sweet Marjoram) Annual

Labiatae, Native to the Mediterranean


HABIT: This 2' plant has velvety, oval, 1" aromatic leaves of grey-green and spikes of tiny white or lilac flowers in midsummer.


GERMINATION: Sow outdoors in early spring as soon as the soil can be worked, or sow indoors, maintaining a temperatur within the medium of 70 degrees during germination which takes 8-14 days.


CULTURE: Plant 6-8" apart in full sun and a light, slightly rich, sandy, well drained soil.


HARVESTING: Pick leaves and stems at any time for fresh use and just before blooming for dried use.



Petroselinum crispum (Parsley) Annual

Umbeliferae, Native to Europe and west Asia

HABIT: The common Parsley is P. crispum var. crispum, a biennial grown as an annual. The plant grows 12-18" and has devided, curled, crisped, dark green foliage. Var. tuberosum, Hamburg Parsley, is grown for its edible, parsnip-like roots. Its foliage is flat.


GERMINATION: Soak seeds in warm water for 24 hours before sowing. Sow outdoors 2-4 weeks before last frost, 1/4" deep in rows 12" apart. In warm climates, sow outdors in early fall. Seed may also sow indoors 8 weeks before last frost, maintaining a temperature within the medium of 70-75 degrees during germination which takes 14-21 days. Since parsley is difficult to transplant, sow in peat pots. Completely cover seed as darkness helps germination.


CULTURE: Grow in full sun or light shade, 6-8" apart, in a rich, deep tilled, well drained soil. Fetilize when plants are 4" tall and again one month later. Parsley may also be grown in a sunny window.


HARVESTING: Pick leaves at any time. If the plant is allowed to grow a second year, pick leaves before the flowers open. Hamburg Parsley is dug in the fall after a frost, and is used for flavoring or as a vegetable. Its leaves have very little flavor.



Salvia officinalis (Garden Sage) Perennial

Labiatae, Native to the Meditrannean


HABIT: Sage is a semi-shrubby 2-2 1/2' herb with oblong, white, wooly leaves and flowers of violet-blue in spikes.


GERMINATION: Sow outdoors in early spring as soon as the soil can be worked, or sow indoors, maintaining a temperature within the medium of 60-70 degrees during germination which takes 14-21 days.


CULTURE: Plant 12-18" apart in full sun and a light, sandy, lime rich soil with good drainage.


HARVESTING: Cut the stems and leaves 5-6" long- as the as the flowers are begining to open and hang in the shade to dry.


***NOTE: Never hang herbs in a sunny location to dry, much of the good stuff one hopes to get for their hard work gets bleach away by the sun.



Thymus hyemalis (Winter Thyme)

Thymus vulgaris (Common Thyme) Both Perennials

Labiatae, Native to the Mediterannean


HABIT: Winter Thyme grows to 1' and is a shrubby plant with a grey cast and tiny deep rose flowers in dense clusters. Common Thyme is a stiff gound cover,6-12" high, with 1/2" aromatic, grey-green leaves and small blue-violet flowers in clusters. The flowers appear in spring and the foliage is evergreen in most areas.


GERMINATION: Sow outdoors in early spring or indoors, maintaining a temperature within the medium of of 55 degrees during germination which takes 21-30 days.


CULTURE: Plant 6-8" apart in full sun and a light, sandy, well drained soil that is kept on the dry side. Keep plants clipped to keep them bushy.


HARVESTING: Cut any time, more often the better.


Gifts of Spring

Sweet gifts were wrapped last autumn
To celebrate the spring
They lie beneath the winter snow
'Till birds come back and sing.

Bright flowers of the summer past,
Before they went away,
Tucked all their seeds up tight and dry
To open on a day

When warming sun awakens them
And snows begin to melt;
The greening of earth begins,
And stirring life is felt!

The trees will soon be thick with leaves,
Bird's cheery song begun...
And gifts of spring wrapped long ago
Will open to the sun.

......Micki Dolan