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History of the Hawaiian Government Reorganization bill in the 111th Congress (January 2009 through December 2010). Three matched pairs (companion bills with identical content) of the Akaka bill were introduced in the 111th Congress. Their dates of introduction and bill numbers are: February 4, 2009, S.381 and H.R.862; March 25, 2009: S.708 and H.R.1711; May 7, 2009: S.1011 and H.R.2314. Hearing on H.R.2314 on June 11, 2009 (Kamehameha Day) before U.S. House Committee on Natural Resources (video and transcripts available). Markup set for July 9 postponed at last minute because Republican minority ranking member demands to know Dept of Justice and Obama administration's views on the bill, and perhaps because of OHA and Native Hawaiian Bar Association objections to restrictions on the powers of the Akaka tribe. Hearing on S.1011 on August 6 in U.S. Senate Committee on Indian Affairs; Webcast, written statements by invited witnesses, news reports are provided. U.S. Commission on Civil Rights letter to Congressional leaders once again blasts Akaka bill. Zogby poll results released Dec. 15 show strong opposition to bill. Major amendments planned to be rammed through House and Senate committee markups Dec 16 and 17 strongly opposed by Hawaii Governor and Attorney General. House committee passes unamended (original) H.R.2314 Dec. 16. Senate committee passes heavily amended dangerous version Dec. 17. Jan 28, 2010 OHA and Hawaii Attorney General propose amendments to the Senate amended bill. At least one Republican Senator has put a hold on the bill. Feb. 23 Akaka bill passes the House 245-164. March 23 Governor Lingle letter to all 100 Senators opposes current version of the bill; Huge White House briefing in June for Akaka bill lobbyists confirms Obama will sign the bill when Senate passes it. Compromise reached to amend bill so Lingle will support it. Compromise bill formally introduced November 15, but might be only a decoy. 4 Senators publicly deplore Inouye stealth maneuver to attach Akaka bill to must-pass omnibus spending bill as part of continuing resolution to keep government running. In the lame duck session, December 2010, a trillion dollar omnibus spending bill containing 6000 earmarks included an earmark calling on the Department of Interior to do a study of how to create a Native Hawaiian Indian tribe, but the spending bill was withdrawn from Senate as not passable and so the Akaka bill died.

(c) Copyright 2009 - 2010 Kenneth R. Conklin, Ph.D. All rights reserved

On this page is the history of the Hawaiian Government Reorganization bill (formerly known as the Hawaiian Recognition bill; always known informally as the Akaka bill) during the 111th Congress (January 1, 2009 to December 31, 2010).

The history includes a collection of all significant news reports, editorials, commentaries, letters to editor, cartoons, excerpts from the Congressional Record, etc.

This period of 2 years has been subdivided into several time periods so that the number of items in each period can remain of manageable size.

Following is a complete index of all items for the entire 2 years of the 111th Congress, in chronological order.

At the beginning and end of each time period in the index there is a link going to the webpage containing full text of all items for that period.

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QUICK REVIEW, AND LINKS, FOR THE HISTORY FROM 2000 THROUGH 2008

For a thorough history of the Native Hawaiian Recognition bill from its birth in February 2000 through the present, exposing the pattern of stealth and deception in creating the bill and trying to pass it, see:
http://www.angelfire.com/hi2/hawaiiansovereignty/Akakahistory.html

For the complete history of the Akaka bill in the 108th Congress alone (2003-2004), including all versions of the bill's text, and news coverage of political activity related to it (a total of perhaps 200 pages plus links to additional subpages), see:
http://www.angelfire.com/hi2/hawaiiansovereignty/AkakaHist108thCong.html

For a short history focusing on the stealth tactics during the 108th Congress, see:
http://www.angelfire.com/hi2/hawaiiansovereignty/AkakaStealth20032004.html

The history for the 109th Congress included pleasant surprises in the House of Representatives. The bill stayed bottled up in the committee which had jurisdiction (Resources) and never even came to a vote in that committee. However, the Judiciary Committee took notice that the bill was threatening to come to the floor in the Senate, and did not want to see a repeat of House stealth maneuvers from previous years. Therefore the House Judiciary Subcommittee on the Constitution held a hearing where opponents of the bill were actually allowed to testify along with supporters of the bill -- the first time any opponents have ever been allowed to testify in any hearing in Washington in either the House or the Senate. As a result of that hearing a group of 21 House members wrote a letter to Speaker Hastert demanding that the bill be killed. (even though it had never yet had a hearing in the Resources committee).

The history for the 109th Congress (2005-2006) was tumultuous in the Senate and in the media. Several Senators blocked the bill by placing holds on it. An attempt to bring the bill to the Senate floor in summer 2005 was blocked by God (Hurricane Katrina). In June 2006 there were more than 4 hours of debate on the Senate floor during a two day period leading up to a recorded vote on a cloture motion (a motion to overcome holds on the bill, cut off debate, and bring the bill to a vote). A cloture motion requires 60 votes. There were only 56 votes in favor, including several Republicans who strongly oppose the bill but had made an agreement in late 2004 to support cloture (although they would then be free to vote against the bill itself, and in fact had publicly announced their opposition). Following the failure of cloture in June 2006, the bill remained dormant through the end of the year. Dozens of nationally-known political commentators wrote articles strongly opposing the bill, and major newspapers published editorials and news reports (including a New York Times editorial in favor of the bill). Website coverage for the 109th Congress includes over 2,000 pages of news reports, commentaries, transcripts of the Senate floor debate from the Congressional Record, etc. An 80-page index lists all items in chronological order and provides links to webpages which provide full text of all items for each segment of time. See:
http://www.angelfire.com/hi2/hawaiiansovereignty/AkakaHist109thCong.html

The 110th Congress ran from January 1, 2007 through December 31, 2008. The U.S. House Committee on Resources passed Akaka bill unamended May 2, 2007. The U.S. Senate Indian Affairs Committee held a hearing on the Akaka bill May 3, 2007 and passed it unamended on May 10, 2007. In October 2007 the Akaka bill was scheduled for floor action in the House. On October 22, 2007 President Bush issued a strongly worded statement opposing the Akaka bill and pledging he would veto it if it reached his desk. Nevertheless, the House held a floor debate on the bill on October 24, and passed the bill by a vote of 261-153 after a failed attempt to amend it and/or send it back to the Resources committee. Every Democrat voted in favor. Transcript of the floor debate, and record of the YEAs and NAYs, is provided. In Honolulu, the Hawaii Advisory Committee to the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights held extensive hearings with testimony on several islands, in the face of a strong and vitriolic propaganda campaign in the media against the committee taking up the issue (the committee in previous years had been stacked in favor of Hawaiian sovereignty, but its membership now was more evenly divided and there were fears it might oppose the bill). On November 15, 2007 the committee voted 8-6 not to make any recommendation to the national commission. Throughout 2008 there were many news reports, letters, and commentary on all sides of the issue, but no further action. The Senate Democrat leadership never tried to bring the bill to the floor because the Republicans made it clear they would filibuster. During the last half of 2008 economic issues, and the election, took priority, and the bill died without ever being brought to the Senate floor. A lengthy index of all significant news reports, letters, cartoons, and commentaries provides links to the full text of every indexed item, broken into several time periods. The index is at:
http://www.angelfire.com/planet/bigfiles40/AkakaHist110thCong.html


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NOW BEGINS THE HISTORY OF THE AKAKA BILL IN THE 111TH CONGRESS, JANUARY 2009 THROUGH DECEMBER 2010

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Akaka bill transition from 110th to 111th Congress -- Selected news reports and commentaries setting the stage for 2009. Analysis, predictions, and commentary after the elections of November 4, 2008 until the end of 2008.

INDEX OF TRANSITIONAL ITEMS FROM NOVEMBER 7 2008 THROUGH DECEMBER 31, 2008. Full text of the items below is available at
http://www.angelfire.com/big09a/AkakaTransition110to111Cong.html

November 7: Ken Conklin publishes major essay in Hawaii Reporter online newspaper describing the likelihood the Akaka bill will be passed and signed into law early in 2009, in view of election results; but offering hope that it might be defeated, and reminding readers that civil rights activists have traditionally used the courts to defend against executive and legislative violations of civil rights.

November 18: "The Hill" (Washington D.D. newspaper dedicated to covering Congress) says "Hawaii stands ready to become the Big Kahuna in Washington" and "The Hawaiian punch in Washington is about to get a lot stronger." because of Senator Inouye's great seniority and power, and the larger Democrat majority.

December 8: Honolulu Advertiser Washington D.C. reporter says chances of enacting Akaka bill are very favorable in 2009. [This newspaper itself is very favorable to the bill, so has biased its report. But see December 9]

December 9: The Maui News carries an Associated Press report, distributed nationwide, saying that Obama's election and larger Democrat majorities in Congress will make it easier to pass the Akaka bill in 2009; but there will be fierce resistance from Senate Republicans who might actually be able to block the bill with a filibuster.

December 22: Honolulu Advertiser reports "The arrival of a new Democratic administration in Washington, coupled with Democratic control of Congress, has given renewed hope to supporters of federal recognition for native Hawaiians." But Grassroot Institute President Emeritus says Congress will be focused intently on the economic issues, and Democrats won't want to waste their political capital on akaka bill until late 2009.

December 24: Congresswoman Mazie Hirono (D, HI) says the new Democrat President and larger Democrat majorities in Congress make it likely the Akaka bill will pass; but the very large number of newly elected Representatives give her a big job to "educate" them about the bill.

December 29: Honolulu Star-Bulletin editorial makes a guess about how many votes there will be in the Senate for cloture on the Akaka bill in 2009, and then concludes the bill's backers should press for early action.

December 30: Richard Rowland, founder of Grassroot Institute of Hawaii, short commentary says Akaka bill is going to become law in 2009. It is vague, but one thing for sure -- it will establish a new government in Hawaii, and our people should be allowed to vote on it before it is done without their consent.

END OF INDEX OF TRANSITIONAL ITEMS FROM NOVEMBER 7 2008 THROUGH DECEMBER 31, 2008. Full text of the items above is available at
http://www.angelfire.com/big09a/AkakaTransition110to111Cong.html

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INDEX OF NEWS REPORTS AND COMMENTARIES FOR JANUARY 1, 2009 to February 4, 2009 when the Akaka bill was formally introduced into the 111th Congress. Full text of these items below is available at
http://www.angelfire.com/big09a/AkakaHist111Jan2009.html

January 4, 2009: Whitney Anderson (ethnic Hawaiian former state Senator) says Akaka bill might not be the best path to benefit ethnic Hawaiians, and instead it might be better to amend the Hawaiian Homes Commission Act of 1920.

January 8-9: A major study on the economic impact of the Akaka bill was released by Beacon Hill Institute, a public policy economic think-tank at Suffolk University in Boston. 10-minute video of press conference is available.

January 11: Crystal Kua, spokesperson for OHA, says Beacon Hill Institute study on economic impact of Akaka bill is inaccurate, and unreliable because it was sponsored by opponents of OHA.

January 12: Honolulu Advertiser Washington D.C. correspondent describes the legislation priorities of Hawaii's two Senators and two Representatives; but the Akaka bill is apparently not at the top of their list.

January 13: Honolulu Advertiser columnist David Shapiro encourages Legislature to pass a moratorium on ceded land sales until the Akaka bill has been passed and the Akaka tribe can get control of them.

January 15: 2 letters to editor say Crystal Kua (OHA spokesman) was being dishonest in saying Akaka bill costs would be very small, and the bill should have language to make the U.S. pay all costs instead of Hawaii.

January 16: (1) Honolulu Advertiser editorial urges that the same version of the Akaka bill from 2008 should be re-introduced in Congress in 2009; (2) Andrew Walden commentary notes that the point Advertiser is making is that there were 4 important restrictions on the proposed Akaka tribe that were in the 2008 Akaka bill which had resulted from negotiations with the Bush administration, and which Akaka/Inouye might try to remove from the 2009 version. Walden describes the dangers to Hawaii if those restrictions are removed.

January 18: Excerpts from an online public Q&A with Neil Abercrombie (D, HI)

January 19: Akaka bill is all about money and land (quotes from Neil Abercrombie, Hawaii representative in Congress)

January 23: Open letter to President Obama opposing Akaka bill, written by another man who, like Obama, is part-Caucasian, was born and raised in Hawaii, and attended Punahou school.

January 25: 2 letters raise doubts that Akaka bill would be wise.

January 28: TV station reports conversation with Akaka, who says "The inauguration of Barack Hussein Obama 'keiki o ka Aina o Hawaii' will make a huge different not only in the world and the United States, but for the people of Hawaii."

January 30: TV station reports the OHA trustees went to Washington for Obama's inauguration and also lobbied for the Akaka bill while there.

February 2: Honolulu Star-Bulletin editorial says the Hawaii statehood admission act requires 20% of ceded land revenue be used for ethnic Hawaiians exclusively (FALSE!) and that the state should not sell any ceded lands until the Akaka bill passes and ethnic Hawaiian claims have been settled with the Akaka tribe.

February 4: Ken Conklin major article in Hawaii Reporter discusses bills in Legislature to place moratorium on sales of Hawaii public lands until Akaka bill has been passed and Akaka tribe can negotiate with State. Article includes links to webpages disproving claims in the apology resolution which is the main justification for the Akaka bill.

END OF INDEX OF NEWS REPORTS AND COMMENTARIES FOR JANUARY 1, 2009 to February 4, 2009 when the Akaka bill was formally introduced into the 111th Congress. Full text of these items above is available at
http://www.angelfire.com/big09a/AkakaHist111Jan2009.html

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INDEX OF NEWS REPORTS AND COMMENTARIES FOR FEBRUARY 4, 2009 THROUGH APRIL 30, 2009. Akaka bill formally introduced into the 111th Congress is a very radical version introduced more than 8 years ago, before the Bush administration Dept. of Justice and Republican opposition caused bill supporters to make amendments that protected the people of Hawaii by placing significant restrictions on the future Akaka tribe. President Obama reaffirms support for Akaka bill during White House meeting with reporters. Bill numbers after a March 25 new version are S.708 and H.R.1711. Supreme Court ceded lands decision on March 31 might have an impact on the Akaka bill. Full text of these items below is available at
http://www.angelfire.com/big09a/AkakaHist111Feb2009.html

February 4, 2009: Honolulu Advertiser and Honolulu Star-Bulletin and Pacific Business news report that the Akaka bill has been formally introduced into the 111th Congress, and it is a radical version of the bill from more than 8 years ago, before the Bush administration came into power and before the bill was modified to address concerns of the Department of Justice and Republican opposition.

** NOTE FROM KEN CONKLIN: THE BILL NUMBERS ARE S.381 and H.R.862. In the Senate the bill has been referred to the Committee on Indian Affairs, where both Hawaii Senators Inouye and Akaka are members. In the House the bill has been referred to both the Committee on Resources (which has jurisdiction over all Indian legislation) and the Committee on Judiciary. This is the first time in the bill's 9 year history that the bill has been referred to the Judiciary Committee, although once before the House Judiciary subcommittee on the Constitution (under Republican control) pre-emptively held a hearing on the bill in order to place on the record its concerns that the bill is unconstitutional. Full text of the bill is available at
http://www.angelfire.com/big09a/Akaka020409S381HR862.html
The bill is also available in pdf format, including page numbers and line numbers, produced by the Government Printing Office. Download here:
http://frwebgate.access.gpo.gov/cgi-bin/getdoc.cgi?dbname=111_cong_bills&docid=f:s381is.txt.pdf

February 5: (1) More reporting about the new/old Akaka bill in the local media, taking note that the 2009 version of the bill is missing the restrictions and limitations on the proposed Akaka tribe which worked their way into the bill during the 8 years of President Bush's term in office (such as a prohibition on gambling casinos, a prohibition on taking land into trust to create "Indian country", and a prohibition on claims against military lands); (2) Commentary by minister says it's wrong to ordain special privileges for one racial group, and everyone can and should play by the same set of rules to reach success.

February 6: Governor Lingle says she is unhappy that the prohibition against gambling has been removed from the Akaka bill, and she is silent on whether that will cause her to stop supporting the bill.

February 8: Honolulu Star-Bulletin editorial (for the bazillionth time in 9 years) urges passage of Akaka bill, now unfettered by Bush administration amendments, noting that the Akaka tribe could make megabucks by opening gambling casinos in other states.

February 9: Honolulu Advertiser editorial says the Akaka bill deserves to be passed, but supporters must be prepared to compromise by re-inserting some of the limits on the Akaka tribe that worked their way into the bill during the past 8 years.

February 10: (1) Washington [D.C.] Times reports Akaka bill is back and likely to pass, but the bill is extremely vague on details, so chaos might ensue. (2) Indian Country Today reports the new/old Akaka bill has been introduced, and includes several falsehoods in its article (for example, "Native Hawaiians" collectively did not own any of the ceded lands; and the Akaka bill does not require any negotiations with the state government or local residents in order for the Akaka tribe to take control of lands or jurisdiction.

February 11: Article in Forbes Magazine about the controversy over gambling in Hawaii notes that the Akaka bill has removed the prohibition on gambling by the Akaka tribe, and that Governor Lingle wants the prohibition reinstated.

February 15: HONOLULU ADVERTISER WASHINGTON CORRESPONDENT REPORTS THAT PRESIDENT OBAMA REAFFIRMED HIS SUPPORT FOR THE AKAKA BILL DURING A MEETING WITH REPORTERS IN THE WHITE HOUSE ON FEBRUARY 11.

February 18: (1) Honolulu Star-Bulletin reports that Lingle plans to discuss the Akaka bill and gambling with Senator Akaka during the National Governors Conference in Washington D.C. next week. (2) Honolulu Advertiser reports that Senator Inouye says now is the time to pass the Akaka bill. "If we can't do it now, we're going to have a hell of a time. But we're going to do our best."

February 22: Major article by Andrew Walden explores the history of greed and corruption behind the Akaka bill: "The Akaka Bill: A Cash Cow for Democrats"

February 23: Jere Krischel writes about the concept of special rights for "indigenous" people in the Akaka bill; concludes that it's essentially meaningless, and perhaps we should have a "Native Human Government."

February 27: Three commentaries about the U.S. Supreme Court oral arguments in the ceded lands case and how the likely outcome of that ruling will interact with the Akaka bill

March 1: Maui News lengthy article describes main reasons supporting the Akaka bill from the perspective of ethnic Hawaiians who want protection from lawsuits regarding racial entitlements, and main reasons opposing Akaka bill from the perspective of ethnic Hawaiians who want total independence from the U.S.; but no dicsussion of mainstream civil rights opposition from the perspective of seeking to protect unity and equality under the law.

March 2: Maui News editorial favors Akaka bill and urges secessionists to stop complaining against it because if they stop the bill then ethnic Hawaiians might get nothing at all.

March 6: Letter to editor in Maui News, from Ken Conklin, protests the fact that the news report of March 1 and editorial of March 2 refer only to ethnic Hawaiians who support the Akaka bill because they are racial separatists or oppose the Akaka bill because they are secessionists, but totally ignore the majority of ethnic Hawaiians and everybody else who are proud to be Americans and who hate the idea of racial separatism.

March 15: (1) Letter to editor in The Washington Times (D.C.) by Ken Conklin notes that the Akaka bill would be 50% more devastating for Hawaii than the creation of a 40-million-member African-American tribe would be for all of America; (2) Open letter to President Obama (webpage) asking him to oppose Akaka bill based on his ideals stated in his Berlin Wall speech, his knowledge of the struggle between racial separatists vs. integrationists in the African-American community, and his expertise as a former professor of Constitutional law.

March 16: Honolulu Advertiser reports: "Akaka bill waiting for breathing room. Senator optimistic about its chances, but national issues are taking precedence now"

March 25, 2009: NEW VERSION OF AKAKA BILL INTRODUCED; S.708 AND H.R.1711, for the sole purpose of adding a provision that allegedly prohibits the Akaka tribe from gambling. Official press release on U.S. Senate webpage for Senator Akaka.

March 26: News reports about new version of Akaka bill

March 29: Webpage by Ken Conklin "New version of Akaka bill -- multiple layers of deception"

March 30: Letter by Ken Conklin in Honolulu Advertiser says gambling is the least important issue in Akaka bill and even if all protections from previous years were restored, the bill is still immoral and unconstitutional.

March 31: (1) and (2) U.S. Supreme Court decision in the Hawaii ceded lands case has implications for the Akaka bill: press release by Grassroot Institute of Hawaii and analysis by an attorney with the CATO institute; (3) Letter notes that Akaka bill new protection against gambling does not provide any protection for tribal/state conflict over criminal and civil law.

April 1: Ted Hong, Hilo attorney, says Supreme Court's ceded lands decision tells us all Hawaii's people have a stake in how the ceded lands are used, and that applies to the Akaka bill as well -- we all have a right to participate in deciding our future.

April 2: Letter says Hawaii Congressional delegation propaganda accompanying new version of Akaka bill was incorrect when it said the U.S. had overthrown the Hawaiian monarchy.

April 5: "Duke" Aiona, Hawaii Lieutenant Governor and candidate for Governor in 2010, confirms that he supported the state's position on the ceded lands lawsuit and also supports the Akaka bill

April 6: Entertainer Keith Haugen says if the Akaka billpasses, Hawaii would become the state with the largest number of native Americans.

April 15: Major commentary opposing the Akaka bill, in the form of a letter to President Obama, written by independence activists (secessionists) Kekuni Blaisdell, Lynette Cruz, George Flores, and many others. The commentary is published April 15 in the national leftwing magazine "Commentary, and reprinted on April 21 in both the Honolulu Star-Bulletin and Hawaii Reporter.

April 24: Honolulu Star-Bulletin runs a commentary by two Kamehameha School alumni supporting the Akaka bill and rebutting the Blaisdell secessionist commentary.

April 28: (1) Major open letter to President Obama opposing the Akaka bill, by Ken Conklin, published in Hawaii Reporter. (2) University of Hawai'i at Mānoa Journalism Students Win FOX News Challenge for their news video on Native Hawaiian independence and the Akaka Bill.

END OF INDEX OF NEWS REPORTS AND COMMENTARIES FOR FEBRUARY 4, 2009 THROUGH APRIL 30, 2009 AND CONTINUING. Akaka bill formally introduced into the 111th Congress is a very radical version introduced more than 8 years ago, before the Bush administration Dept. of Justice and Republican opposition caused bill supporters to make amendments that protected the people of Hawaii by placing significant restrictions on the future Akaka tribe. President Obama reaffirms support for Akaka bill during White House meeting with reporters. Bill numbers after a March 25 new version are S.708 and H.R.1711. Supreme Court ceded lands decision on March 31 might have an impact on the Akaka bill. Full text of these items above is available at
http://www.angelfire.com/big09a/AkakaHist111Feb2009.html

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INDEX OF NEWS REPORTS AND COMMENTARIES FROM MAY 1 THROUGH JUNE 30, 2009. New (old) version of Akaka bill (re)introduced on May 7: S.1011 and HR2314. There are now three pairs of the bill active in Senate and House. House Committee on Natural Resources hearing on June 11 (Kamehameha Day) with 6 invited witnesses. Full text of these items below is available at
http://www.angelfire.com/big09a/AkakaHist111May2009.html

May 6, 2009: (1) Hawaii legislature passes bill making it hard for State to sell any ceded lands, causing State and OHA to agree to dismiss the ceded lands lawsuit remanded to state supreme court, and opponents Attorney General bennett and OHA Chair Haunani Apoliona agree they can now work together to pass the Akaka bill.; (2) "Indian Country Today" interview with Native American Rights Fund head John Echohawk discusses three U.S. Supreme Court decisions, and hope the Akaka bill will pass because restoration of independent nationhood is unlikely.

May 7: Honolulu Star-Bulletin editorial says "Let Akaka Bill reconcile ceded lands issue."

May 8: Both Honolulu dailies report that another version of the Akaka bill has been introduced [the third one this year!] and say the reason is to prohibit gambling by the Akaka tribe. They say the bill is one previously introduced in 2007 which passed the House.

** NOTE BY WEBSITE EDITOR KEN CONKLIN:
The Native Hawaiian Government Reorganization bill introduced in the U.S. Senate and U.S. House of Representatives on MAY 7, 2009. In the Senate the bill is S.1011. In the House the bill is H.R.2314. The bills have identical content. FULL TEXT OF THE BILLS IS AT
http://www.angelfire.com/big09a/Akaka050709S1011HR2314.html
Commentary by Ken Conklin:
Akaka Bill Shell Game, May 2009 -- 3 versions are now active in both the House and Senate, but which is the real one?
http://www.angelfire.com/big09a/AkakaShellGameMay2009.html

May 11: Mini-editorial in Honolulu Star-Bulletin once again touts the anti-gambling provision in the May 7 bill as though it is something new, even though the anti-gambling provision in the March 25 version of the bill was identical with the May 7 version.

May 13: (1) "Akaka Bill Shell Game, May 2009 -- 3 versions are now active in both the House and Senate, but which is the real one?" [Hawaii Reporter]; (2) Sacramento Indians hope bill will restore sovereignty -- in Hawaii [Sacramento Bee]; (3) Divided state GOP prepares for annual convention [KPUA Radio AM 670, Hilo Hawaii]

May 30: AP news report: Hawaiian Bill Unlikely Before State's Anniversary [i.e., after Congressional August recess]

June 3 (1) Honolulu Star-Bulletin reports the House Natural Resources Committee will hold a hearing on the Akaka bill -- but fails to tell the date, time, or place of the hearing and which version of the bill will be considered! (2) Honolulu Advertiser reports "breaking news": A full-length documentary, "Hawaii - A Voice for Sovereignty," premieres tomorrow night at the U.S. Capitol Visitor Center to an invited audience of writers, pundits, Washington power brokers and lawmakers. [Ken Conklin's note: This is where the Kamehameha statue formerly in Statuary Hall has now been relocated; there will probably be a lei draping, prayer, and chant.]

June 4: Honolulu Advertiser reports "breaking news" that there will be a hearing on the Akaka bill in the House Natural Resources Committee on Thursday morning June 11 [Kamehameha Day].

June 5: (1) Honolulu Star-Bulletin published a puff piece interview of Clyde Namu'o, OHA Administrator: "With the Akaka Bill set to be heard Thursday by a U.S. House committee, the administrator of OHA talks about prospects for passage"; (2) Honolulu Advertiser reports that OHA trustees have voted to support the Akaka bill [what a shock!] but want some important changes.

June 7: (1) Honolulu Advertiser reports: "Sovereignty documentary debuts in D.C. Filmmaker says Hawaii project changed her life." Film trailer and info website about the film provided in comment by Ken Conklin; (2) Maui News publishes Associated Press report that there are no hearings yet scheduled for Akaka bill -- several days after it became public knowledge that such a hearing has been scheduled for June 11.

June 8: (1) House committee hearing on the Akaka bill set for Thursday June 11 will be webcast live (witness list included); (2) Honolulu Advertiser reports the hearing will be Thursday, noting that's Kamehameha Day; (3) Advertiser reports "With traditional hula and flower lei, more than 400 people gathered in the nation's Capitol yesterday to observe the birthday of King Kamehameha and praise his legacy as a warrior and unifier of the Hawaiian people."

June 9: Honolulu Advertiser editorial urges "Akaka Bill revisions should make it inclusive" by which they mean to agree with OHA's request to amend the bill to include an additional definition of who is eligible to join the Akaka tribe to include anyone descended from a resident of Hawaii before 1778.

June 10: On the day before the House committee hearing, Associated Press circulated an article published in many newspapers and TV newscasts throughout America, describing the Akaka bill and the hopes for its passage.

June 12, 2009: 5 news reports and 2 editorials about the hearing on the Akaka bill on June 11 in the U.S. House Committee on Natural Resources: (1) Hawaii Reporter "Akaka Bill Hearing: Video and Written Testimony by Invited Witnesses in the U.S. House Committee on Natural Resources on June 11, 2009"; (2) Honolulu Star-Bulletin "Akaka Bill's legality debated: The bill gets a new airing with improved odds, but critics charge it is unconstitutional"; (3) The Maui News "Akaka Bill opponents found in the islands, too" and article with identical content in The Cherokee Phoenix "Akaka Bill debate renewed"; (4) The Honolulu Advertiser Headline in the physical newspaper is: ALLIES DEFEND AKAKA BILL. Article title and subtitle are: "Native Hawaiian bill in Congress defended as not 'race-based' -- Isle delegation rebuts racial claims on legislation as Congress renews debate"; (5) Committee on Natural Resources ranking member Rep. Doc Hastings news release and YouTube video "Statement on the Native Hawaiian Government Reorganization Act"; (6) Hawaii Reporter guest editorial "What Kamehameha Hath Joined Together, Let Not Akaka Rip Asunder" (by Kenneth R. Conklin, Ph.D.); (7) Honolulu Star-Bulletin editorial "Akaka Bill should pass with new amendments"

June 13: Maui News editorial says Kamehameha resolved old conflicts by unifying the islands and the Akaka bill will resolve modern conflicts.

June 14: Honolulu Advertiser letter says Obama's stance in favor of Akaka bill weakens his unaugural address calling for unity.

June 16: (1) Very thoughtful analysis of the Akaka bill, including the analogy to a Chicano Nation of Aztlan, written from the perspective of Indian tribes and published in the online magazine "Indian Country Today"; (2) Letter says Akaka bill is racist

June 18: 2 letters to editor note that the Kingdom (unlike the Akaka bill) was not racially exclusionary; and wondering what Rep. Abercrombie was talking about during the House committee hearing when he sais the bill is needed to protect against some nefarious group taking over big pieces of Hawaii's public lands.

June 19: Regular Friday columnist in The Maui News views Akaka bill as a compromise between polar opposites of those who favor full sovereign independence vs. those who oppose race-based special rights.

June 20: New York Times editor describes that Hawaii has fallen on hard times (economy, North Korean missile threat, global warming, endangered species, etc.) and then concludes Congress should pass the Akaka bill.

June 21: Ken Conklin letter in The Maui News entitled "Akaka bill splits what Kamehameha joined."

June 24: (1) Bob Jones, long-time columnist for MidWeek newspaper, says it might be time to kill the Akaka bill, and eventually OHA, and if it passes the Supreme Court will probably rule it unconstitutional; See also July 1 for major rebuttal from OHA chair Haunani Apoliona, and July 8 letter defending Jones; (2) Professor J. Kehaulani Kauanui (Wesleyan University; secessionist) letter in Honolulu Weekly wants that "alternative" newspaper to provide opposition to the Akaka bill since both Honolulu daily papers support it.

June 25: Two letters in Maui News: (1) Akaka bill seeks to manufacture consent of native Hawaiians to transfer of their lands to U.S.; (2) The U.S. received stolen property in Hawaii and owes Hawaiians $100 trillion in damages.

June 28: Letter in Maui News says Akaka bill converts a multiracial nationality (Hawaiian) into a racial group, thus perpetuating the racialization started in the Hawaiian Homes Commission Act of 1921.

END OF INDEX OF NEWS REPORTS AND COMMENTARIES FROM MAY 1 THROUGH JUNE 30, 2009. New (old) version of Akaka bill (re)introduced on May 7: S.1011 and HR2314. There are now three pairs of the bill active in Senate and House. House Committee on Natural Resources hearing on June 11 (Kamehameha Day) with 6 invited witnesses. Full text of these items above is available at
http://www.angelfire.com/big09a/AkakaHist111May2009.html

==============

INDEX OF NEWS REPORTS AND COMMENTARIES FROM JULY 1 THROUGH AUGUST 31, 2009. House Committee on Natural Resources markup set for July 9 postponed at last minute because Republican minority ranking member demands to know Dept of Justice and Obama administration's views on the bill, and perhaps because of OHA and Native Hawaiian Bar Association objections to restrictions on the powers of the Akaka tribe. ON THURSDAY AUGUST 6 THE U.S. SENATE COMMITTEE ON INDIAN AFFAIRS HELD A HEARING ON S.1011. Webcast, written statements by invited witnesses, news reports are provided. U.S. COMMISSION ON CIVIL RIGHTS BLASTS AKAKA BILL. Full text of these items below is available at
http://www.angelfire.com/big09a/AkakaHist111July2009.html

July 1: Editorials by two OHA trustees in the OHA monthly newspaper for July: (1) Walter Heen says when the Akaka bill passes there will be a firestorm of resistance and opposition from numerous Hawaiian sovereignty groups; (2) Boyd Mossman says Hawaii is part of America now, and when the Akaka bill passes, ethnic Hawaiians will need lots of help from American government to help the new Akaka tribe provide benefits to its members.; (3) OHA "clarifies" what is the Akaka bill definition of "native Hawaiian" for Star-Bulletin newspaper; (4) OHA chair Haunani Apoliona responds to Bob Jones' June 24 article which said it's time to kill the Akaka bill.

July 8: (1) Ken Conklin straight news report in Hawaii Reporter that the House Committee on Natural Resources is scheduled to meet to markup Akaka bill on July 9, including live webcast; (2) Honolulu Advertiser reports online breaking news that the Akaka bill markup has been postponed for an undetermined number of weeks because the Native Hawaiian Bar Association warns that some bill provisions would cripple the Akaka tribe; (3) Ken Conklin updates Hawaii Reporter article to announce the postponement and to describe the protections in the current language of the Akaka bill which caused the Native Hawaiian Bar Association to file objections and delay the markup; (4) Ken Conklin commentary explains why "The Akaka Bill Can be Rejected for Reasons that Do Not Attack the Legitimacy of the Genuine Indian Tribes"; (5) Letter defends Bob Jones Midweek commentary of June 24 that had said it's time to kill the Akaka bill

July 9: (1) Honolulu Advertiser publishes in its print edition a slightly improved version of yesterday's online breaking news report that the House committee meeting was postponed; (2) Scott Crawford (Hawaiian secessionist blogger) published the contents of the Native Hawaiian Bar Association letter to the House committee which caused the committee to postpone the markup meeting.

July 12: Winona Rubin, retired Kamehameha Schools administrator, and activist in numerous racial separatist institutions, writes commentary in Honolulu Advertiser supporting the Akaka bill (even while she acknowledges it is flawed), and ranting against the Grassroot Institute of Hawaii claiming it is a front organization for mainland groups seeking to abolish native Hawaiian rights.

July 16: President emeritus of Grassroot Institute notes that Akaka bill is based on federal apology for alleged federal misdeeds in 1893; yet the burden will be placed on Hawaii residents to pay for it.

July 28: (1 and (2) 2 articles report the remarks of Senators Akaka and Inouye on the Senate floor regarding their resolution celebrating Hawaii's 50th anniversary of statehood. Their comments indicate the U.S. has an obligation in view of the apology resolution of 1993 to pass the Akaka bill. (3) The Hawaii Independent (an ethnic Hawaiian online newsaper promoting an independent nation of Hawaii) has a lengthy and very insightful article about Senate procedures for passing the Akaka bill and who are the Senators to watch.

July 29: Attorney H. William Burgess, a member of the Hawaii Advisory Committee, publishes his letter to the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights describing the most important civil rights issues facing Hawaii. The Akaka bill is high on his list.

July 30: (1) Honolulu Advertiser reports BREAKING NEWS THAT THE U.S. SENATE COMMITTEE ON INDIAN AFFAIRS WILL HOLD A HEARING ON THE AKAKA BILL ON THURSDAY AUGUST 6. (2) Tom Macdonald, spokesman for Aloha For All, notes an article published in the Sacramento Bee indicating that if the Akaka bill passes then many thousands of ethnic Hawaiians living on the mainland are likely to "return" to Hawaii and become a burden on the state's social service network.

July 31: Tom Macdonald reports a list of reparations (land, money, jurisdiction) which OHA said in 1993 would be the result of the apology resolution; these are outcomes the Akaka bill is intended to produce.

August 3: (1) Tom Macdonald published a list of demands for transfer of land, money, and jurisdiction to a Native Hawaiian government that was published by OHA in 1993 in relation to the 100th anniversary of the overthrow of the monarchy and were included in draft legislation for a Native Hawaiian restoration bill to accompany the apology resolution, and compares that list with the actual list of negotiating topics contained in and empowered by the current Akaka bill; (2) Robert R. Kessler open letter to U.S. Senate opposing Akaka bill on grounds it is racially divisive, would cause uncertainty and instability in the already-depressed business environment, and would encourage the secessionist movement.

August 6-7: ON AUGUST 6 THE U.S. SENATE COMMITTEE ON INDIAN AFFAIRS HELD A HEARING ON S.1011, THE AKAKA BILL. Provided on this webpage are the webcast, and written testimonies of invited witnesses, a summary of the oral testimony focusing on the 14th Amendment, and several news reports and commentaries.

August 9: Both the Honolulu Advertiser and the Honolulu Star-Bulletin devote their Sunday editorials to supporting the Akaka bill.

August 10: (1) Columnist Brian Darling in "Human Events" magazine opposes Akaka bill as unconstitutional and because of its impact in Hawaii; (2) "News report" in Honolulu Advertiser says some ethnic Hawaiian activists reject statehood, saying it's a crime because of illegal overthrow of monarchy, illegal annexation, and illegal statehood vote in 1959.

August 11: (1) Hawaii Reporter has detailed news report about major issues raised by all sides in the U.S. Senate committee hearing of August 6 on the Akaka bill; (2) "Aloha For All" communications director issues challenge to Honolulu Advertiser to back up erroneous claims of fact is made in its editorial of August 9 which supported the Akaka bill.

August 14: Earl Arakaki points out that the Akaka bill is well-named, because in Hawaiian language the word "akaka" is both a noun and verb which means split, crack, or separation.

August 18: (1) Commentary in Honolulu Advertiser by leaders of Aloha For All says "Akaka bill clashes with Hawaii ideals"; (2) "Indian Country Today" reports on Senate Committee on Indian Affairs hearing on Akaka bill on August 6, and emphasizes deep divisions over the bill within the Native Hawaiian community.; (3) Andrew Walden publishes in-depth analysis of the Akaka bill amendments being demanded by OHA and the Native Hawaiian Bar Association, and the devastating effects they would have.

August 19: Honolulu weekly editor Ragnar Carlson first describes his personal opinions in favor of the Akaka bill, and then provides a plain-English description of what's in the Akaka bill which Carlson claims is straightforward and unbiased.

August 24: (1) Jon Van Dyke, UH law professor and frequent paid spokesman for OHA, published commentary in Honolulu Star-Bulletin entitled "Akaka Bill would be 'win-win'"; (2) Michael Bates open letter to Senate opposing Akaka bill; (3) Ken Conklin "Anti-American Rage in Hawaii -- Hawaii golden jubilee includes ripping the 50th star off the U.S. flag and burning it." Says passing Akaka bill would empower radical, racist, anti-Americans.

August 25: (1) Earl Arakaki notes that Senator Akaka's name aptly describes what his bill would do to Hawaii: in Hawaiian "akaka" means a rent, split, chink, separation; to crack, split, scale; (2) The Pacific Citizen (Japanese American Citizens League newspaper) reports that Native Hawaiians are divided on the Akaka bill. "We have been supportive of Native Hawaii sovereignty from the beginning," said Floyd Mori, JACL national director. "Their history is too much like Native Americans who had their land taken away and left to fend for themselves in unwanted spaces. Hawaiians deserve the dignity that is due to them as the original inhabitants of the islands."

August 26: (1) "Native Hawaiian Convention" hears speeches urging support for Akaka bill; (2) President Obama's associate director of community engagement will speak to the convention tomorrow on behalf of the President.

August 27: (1) "[W]hether you focus on the 94 percent approval rate of those actually voting, or the 60 percent approval rate counting all those eligible to vote, a solid majority voted in favor of statehood in 1959."; (2) "Akaka Bill Would Destroy Hawaii's Precious Gift of Aloha"

August 28: (1) U.S. CIVIL RIGHTS COMMISSION letter to Congressional leaders once again blasting the Akaka bill, on official stationery with Commissioners' signatures; (2) Letter to editor from ethnic Hawaiian opposing Akaka bill; (3) News report about speech to Native Hawaiian Convention by Obama spokesman praising ethnic Hawaiians for perseverance.

August 29: 2 letters to editor: Conquerors have enjoyed benefits, now must show sympathy to poor downtrodden Hawaiians (so pass Akaka bill); Supreme Court says ceded lands belong to all Hawaii citizens, so Akaka bill is now anachronistic.

August 30: (1) Honolulu Advertiser (finally!) reports new letter to Congress from U.S. Commission on Civil Rights that blasts the Akaka bill, but Advertiser story spins the "news" report by telling very little of what was in the letter, while giving Rep. Abercrombie's views much more space; (2) Ken Conklin letter in Maui News says learning the truth about Hawaii history takes time and effort far beyond the propaganda phrases in the newspaper, and offers a webpage and a book for readers to study.

August 31: "Akaka Bill a zero-sum game, not 'win-win'" -- rebuttal to Jon Van Dyke's August 24 commentary, by Aloha For All leaders

END OF INDEX OF NEWS REPORTS AND COMMENTARIES FROM JULY 1 THROUGH AUGUST 31, 2009. House Committee on Natural Resources markup set for July 9 postponed at last minute because Republican minority ranking member demands to know Dept of Justice and Obama administration's views on the bill, and perhaps because of OHA and Native Hawaiian Bar Association objections to restrictions on the powers of the Akaka tribe. ON THURSDAY AUGUST 6 THE U.S. SENATE COMMITTEE ON INDIAN AFFAIRS HELD A HEARING ON S.1011. Webcast, written statements by invited witnesses, news reports are provided. U.S. COMMISSION ON CIVIL RIGHTS BLASTS AKAKA BILL. Full text of these items above is available at
http://www.angelfire.com/big09a/AkakaHist111July2009.html

=================

INDEX OF INDEX OF NEWS REPORTS AND COMMENTARIES FROM SEPTEMBER 1, 2009 THROUGH DECEMBER 31, 2009. Washington Times Sept 8 editorial blasts Akaka bill. Congressman Abercrombie announces he will resign in a few weeks to run for Governor, but waiting until important Congressional business is done. House and Senate committees suddenly schedule markup meetings and votes. ZOGBY POLL SHOWS HAWAII PEOPLE STRONGLY OPPOSE THE BILL AND WANT HEARINGS IN HAWAII. DEC. 16 ABERCROMBIE TRIED TO RAM DANGEROUS MAJOR AMENDMENTS THROUGH HOUSE COMMITTEE MARKUP AT LAST MINUTE, BUT HAWAII GOVERNOR AND ATTORNEY GENERAL FOUND OUT AND STRONGLY PROTESTED, SO ABERCROMBIE BACKED OFF AND THE UNAMENDED VERSION PASSED EASILY. DEC. 17 SENATE COMMITTEE PASSED THE VERSION INCLUDING THE DANGEROUS AMENDMENTS.
Full text of these items below is available at
http://www.angelfire.com/big09a/AkakaHist111Sept2009.html

September 1, 2009: (1) and (2) Two minority members of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights publish a letter to Congressional leaders supporting the Akaka bill and disagreeing with the letter a few days ago by 6 Commissioners who opposed the bill; (3) Southern Poverty Law Center article in its quarterly "Intelligence Report" for Fall 2009 describes anti-Caucasian racial hate crimes in Hawaii, and webpage by Ken Conklin analyzes the article.

Sept. 4: OHA trustee Oswald Stender commentary says "U.S. Commission on Civil Rights skewed. Panel composed of members who have agendas of their own" Response in letter on September 13.

Sept 5: Honolulu Star-Bulletin editorial says the U.S. Civil Rights Commission letter opposing the Akaka bill should be ignored because, the newspaper says (incorrectly), the USCCR is entirely a holdover from the Bush administration.

Sept 6: (1) Commentary by two Hawaiian independence activists: "Akaka Bill supporter [Jon Van Dyke, August 24] ignores inherent Kanaka Maoli rights"; (2) Pablo Wegesend, of German, Hispanic, and Portuguese ancestry, but no Hawaiian native blood, makes objection to Hawaiians who say non-Hawaiians have somewhere else to "go back" to: "Lifelong Hawaii resident has no other place to call home"; (3) Hawaiian independence activist notes that the Kingdom was multiracial, and citizenship should not be conflated with race.

Sept 7: Andrew Walden analyzes infighting among factions of ethnic Hawaiians regarding how the Akaka bill should be amended, and wonders whether the bill will implode.

Sept 8: WASHINGTON TIMES EDITORIAL BLASTS AKAKA BILL.

Sept 11: Honolulu Star-Bulletin mini-editorial notes that Census data on health insurance coverage gives ammunition to opponents of Akaka bill because ethnic Hawaiians have only 18% who lack coverage, whereas Native Americans and Native Alaskans have 31% who lack coverage.

Sept 13: (1) Letter responds to Stender's commentary (Sept 4) by saying ethnic Hawaiians are nothing like an Indian tribe, and there are major reasons why Akaka bill is unconstitutional; (2) President of Native Hawaiian Bar Association commentary demanding changes to Akaka bill to remove restrictions on ability to sue the federal and state governments for past and future grievances and remove protections for the U.S. military against intrusiveness from the Akaka tribe.

Sept 16: Five-hour meeting about the Akaka bill in a labor union hall on Hawaii Island turns nasty as ethnic Hawaiians opposing the bill seem to outnumber those supporting it and heatedly debate them (union leadership supports the bill).

Sept 21: Commentary says the Akaka bill is an unfunded federal mandate. The U.S. confesses in the 1993 apology resolution that it committed a crime against Hawaii in 1893; and in the Akaka bill the U.S. reiterates that confession but then lays the burden on Hawaii to pay restitution by carving up the public lands of Hawaii.

Sept 22: Commentary "Three Eloquent Reasons to Just Say No to the Akaka Bill and the Secessionists" [Supreme Court tells Hawaii the Constitution is part of our heritage; Justice Scalia said there can be no debtor or creditor race; King Kamehameha III said God has made of one blood all races of people]

Sept 25: Article describes how Senator Inouye introduced legislation that "Native American Sovereignty Should Equal That of States"

Sept 27: Honolulu Advertiser editorial praises reorganization plan announced by Office of Hawaiian Affairs, saying it is a good move regardless whether the Akaka bill passes this year or not.

October 9: (1) "Politico" syndicated column describes Senator Akaka as Mr. Congeniality, whose pleasant low-key demeanor is his way of exercising influence; (2) Honolulu Star-Bulletin interviews former governor Ben Cayetano about his recent autobiography, including comments about the Supreme Court's Rice v. Cayetano decision and his belief that it has been clear ever since that decision in 2000 that the Akaka bill is unconstitutional.

Oct 13 and 14: Conklin letter to editor in Star-Bulletin, and longer guest editorial in Hawaii Reporter, notes that newly canonized Saint Damien gave his life to help leprosy patients, most of whom were native Hawaiians; and OHA calls Damien the "patron saint of Native Hawaiians"; but Damien would be prohibited from joining the Akaka tribe because he lacks Hawaiian blood.

October 18: Rebuttal letter to October 13 by Puakea Nogelmeier (Hawaiian language expert) says the Akaka bill is flawed because it should include all descendants of Kingdom subjects regardless of race, and the issue of Damien is irrelevant to the Akaka bill because Damien never applied for citizenship.

October 19: Rebuttal letter to October 13 by Alfred Bloom (expert on Buddhism), says it is reprehensible to politicize Damien's elevation to sainthood; and in any case Damien "would have stood on the side of justice and redressing a wrong, without regard to personal benefit to himself."

October 20: Conklin letter about Saint Damien (somewhat longer version) published in The Maui News

Amazingly, there were no published items about the Akaka bill from October 20 to November 20 !!

November 20: Attorney Paul M. Sullivan updated his 65-page point-by-point rebuttal to the Akaka bill, including cartoons by Daryl Cagle.

December 1: OHA trustee Walter Heen writes a column in the monthly OHA newspaper saying that "It's clear that the 'Akaka Bill' will become law before too long" and describing the process that will take place after it passes, whereby a Native Hawaiian Governing Entity will become established.

December 9: The U.S. Senate Committee on Indian Affairs had set a business meeting for December 9, which was then postponed to December 17. The agenda, on official committee letterhead, lists the Akaka bill as one of two topics to be discussed. However, it would be very difficult for anyone interested solely in the Akaka bill to know that it was included on the agenda, because nowhere on the committee website does it indicate the Akaka bill was to be discussed, unless someone blindly downloads the letterhead agenda not knowing what is on it.

December 10: OHA chair Haunani Apoliona gave her annual "State of OHA" speech, in which she said OHA will work to build readiness for when the Akaka bill passes. OHA Administrator Clyde Namuo said he expects the U.S. Senate to take up the matter early next year, with a vote by late January or February.

December 11: News scoop in Hawaii Reporter (online newspaper): "Akaka Bill Committee Actions for This Coming Week. House committee markup Wednesday December 16; Senate committee meeting on Thursday December 17." Full details, plus a short history of the Akaka bill.

December 12: (1) Andrew Walden in Hawaii Free Press (online) scathingly describes the two committee hearings scheduled for next week, and some details about which ethnic Hawaiian groups have opposed the language of the bill for what reasons; (2) Honolulu Star-Bulletin reports that the House committee hearing is set for next week, but totally neglects to say anything about Senate committee meeting also scheduled for next week even though a large part of the newspaper's report was based an interview with Senator Akaka's spokesman Jesse Broder Van Dyke.

December 13: "Breaking news" reports protest planned tomorrow against Akaka Bill 'sneak attack'

December 14: (1) KITV television "Group Protests Akaka Bill At Capitol; Leaders Say Senators Trying To Push Bill Through Appropriations; (2) KGMB/KHNL TV "Opponents of Akaka Bill stage protest, accuse senator of ‘back-door' tactics"; (3) Honolulu Advertiser breaking news "Sen. Inouye responds to charges of Akaka Bill 'sneak attack'"; (4) National Review online reports Democrat plan to sneak the Akaka bill through before Christmas, and repeats powerful NRO editorial against the bill from 2006; (5) Andrew Breitbart BIG GOVERNMENT blog publishes lengthy essay opposing Akaka bill by Brian Darling of Heritage Foundation

December 15 Part 1 (before major news): (1) Honolulu Advertiser Washington correspondent reports Sens Akaka and Inouye's rebuttals to accusations of "sneak attack" and says there have been negotiations between Obama's Dept. of Justice and the Hawaii delegation; (2) Honolulu Star-Bulletin reports on protest by 100 Native Hawaiians against the Akaka bill, and emphasizes their demand to have local hearings on the bill in Hawaii; (3) The Washington Examiner regular commentary staff writer says "The bill is mind-bendingly bad in its intent and likely effects, but it has a serious chance of passage."; (4) A leader of the protest at the Capitol publishes lengthy essay saying the sneak attack was stopped by the publicity about the plans for it, and there should be hearings on the bill in Hawaii; (5) CQ Politics, State Track notes that Rep. Abercrombie's early resignation increases the chances for a Republican to win the seat, since a special election is winner-take-all and several popular Democrat candidates might split the vote allowing the lone Republican to win with less than 50%.

DECEMBER 15 PART 2. 2 MAJOR NEWS ITEMS:
(A) ZOGBY POLL ON AKAKA BILL, INCLUDING PDF FILE WITH FULL TEXT OF THE QUESTIONS AND PERCENTAGES OF EACH RESPONSE; AND
(B) DISCLOSURE THAT SECRET NEGOTIATIONS AMONG DEMOCRATS HAVE PRODUCED MAJOR AMENDMENTS TO THE BILL THAT WILL BE RAMMED THROUGH THE MARKUPS IN THE HOUSE AND SENATE COMMITTEES THIS WEEK, AND HAWAII'S GOVERNOR AND ATTORNEY GENERAL STRONGLY OPPOSE THOSE AMENDMENTS. SOME OF THE TEXT OF THE AMENDMENTS IS INCLUDED IN THE AG LETTER AND THE DANGERS ARE DISCUSSED THERE.

December 16: (1) Honolulu Advertiser reports Governor Lingle opposes the amended version of the Akaka bill which Abercrombie plans to substitute during the committee meeting today.; (2) Maui News, and Honolulu Star-Bulletin, report that Attorney General Bennet wrote to the committee that changes proposed by Abercrombie would unacceptably alter the relationships between federal and state governments and the native Hawaiian governing entity the measure would create. "This creates a whole set of unknowns," Bennett said in an interview yesterday. "We welcome an opportunity to have a discussion (about) the changes and the impact, but were never afforded that."; (3) Associated Press report printed in hundreds of newspaper (including Taiwan!): Bennett said authority granted the new government entity originally was intended to come about only after negotiations and after the passage of legislation enacted by Congress, and when applicable, by the state. But an amended version of the bill makes immediate changes that are not subject to negotiation and none of which (to our knowledge) has been evaluated for its impact on Hawaii. Congressional aides said that changes being proposed to the bill were sought by lawyers at the Justice Department.; (4) Press release from committee's top Republican complains "Democrat Majority Proceeds with Markup of Native Hawaiian Bill Despite Strong Opposition"; (5) "Breaking news" says Abercrombie still pushing new version of bill but will let Attorney General Bennett talk with him about it before the full House votes on it; (6) New Orleans TV station gives lengthy report on Abercrombie vs. Bennett; (7) Abercrombie official statement says committee passed the bill "as I introduced it earlier this year, without change or amendment."; (8) Doc Hastings, top Republican on committee, issues statement "It was the correct course of action for Democrats to abandon their rush to adopt the proposed changes to the Akaka Bill at today’s hastily-scheduled markup."; (9) KITV4 News: "The opposition of revised legislation to grant federal recognition to Native Hawaiians has prompted finger pointing and division from Honolulu to Capitol Hill."; (10) Columnist who favors Akaka bill says slow down and think carefully; (11) Widely distributed AP news report says Abercrombie promised that he would work with state officials to address concerns that the measure doesn't protect the state's rights and interests as the new government is formed.; (12) Official minutes of the committee meeting (Akaka portion only); (13) Chairman Rahall's press release expressing his personal views as top Democrat.

December 17: (1) WALL STREET JOURNAL editorial against the Akaka bill. "Aloha, Segregation. The Akaka bill would create a race-based state in Hawaii."; (2) Honolulu Advertiser (morning) reports Abercrombie withdrew his amended version and the House committee yesterday passed the Akaka bill without any amendments; (3) Advertiser breaking news later reports the Senate committee has passed an amended version of the Akaka bill unanimously on a voice vote -- presumably the same amended version Abercrombie had tried and failed to pass yesterday in the House committee; (4) KIV4 reports the Senate committee passed the amended version of the Akaka bill, which Governor Lingle opposes, and Akaka promises to meet with Lingle to discuss is.

December 18: (1) Honolulu Advertiser reports the Senate committee yesterday passed the Akaka bill in a version as amended with help on the dradfting of the amendments from the Obama administration, and Akaka and Inouye promised to work with Lingle to resolve the State's concerns before the bill goes to the Senate floor; (2) Honolulu Advertiser editorial says "Congress, state need unity on Akaka bill" and notes some of the very important changes suddenly placed in the bill; (3) Honolulu Star-Bulletin short AP article merely says Akaka bill has passed both committees but does not mention that the two versions are very different; (4) Human Events magazine (online) gives detailed report on the overall Akaka bill and the differences between the two versions; and the opposition of Hawaii's Governor and Attorney General; and the Zogby poll showing most Hawaii people oppose the bill; (5) Letter to editor says many Hawaii people oppose Akaka bill, and we need hearings in Hawaii for public testimony.

December 19: (1) Honolulu Advertiser reports that the new version of the Akaka bill passed by the Senate committee is strongly opposed by Governor Lingle, who also complains she was never consulted about it.; (2) Honolulu Star-Bulletin provides additional details; (3) Attorney John Vecchione, writing on "The Frum Forum" blog, says he is a political conservative and explains why conservatives should support the Akaka bill as an exercise in self-determination and because America should keep its word.

December 20: (1) Senator Dan Akaka writes commentary in Honolulu Advertiser defending his newly amended version of the Akaka bill which passed the Senate committee on December 17; (2) Hawaii Attorney General Mark Bennett writes commentary in Honolulu Advertiser criticizing the newly amended version of the Akaka bill, saying "The new provisions have never been the subject of a public hearing or public testimony, and there has been no public explanation or discussion of the impact of the new provisions on Hawai'i and our citizens. ... At the very least, public hearings should be held on the drastic changes being proposed so their impact on Hawai'i can be fully discussed, debated, and understood."; (3) Honolulu Star-Bulletin editorial calls for public hearings on the Akaka bill in Hawaii during the holiday recess.; (4) Letter notes that Inouye's protest that he would never try to pass Akaka bill as part of a defense appropriations bill is silly, because that's exactly what Inouye has often done.; (5) Andrew Walden article in Hawaii Free Press examines requirements for membership in the Akaka tribe as described in the version of the bill that passed the Senate committee, and concludes "More than 73% of Hawaiians not "Qualified" for membership in Akaka Tribe."; (6) Andrew Walden article in Hawaii Free Press notes that many Indian tribes have been dis-enrolling numerous members in order to increase the dollar payout per person, from casino revenues and other sources, to remaining members.

December 23: (1) Honolulu Advertiser columnist Jerry Burris raises questions about how the new version of the Akaka bill came to be proposed, and describes some of its differences with the older version.; (2) A past president of the Hawaii Council American Indian Nations says Hawaiians were never anything like an Indian tribe; (3) Letter says "An American citizen is just that. Any attempt to classify us otherwise is wrong. Any attempt to create a separate government within our present constitutional structure to contain a particular ethnic entity is wrong and should not even be contemplated."

December 24: Honolulu Advertiser editorial advises Senator Akaka to withdraw his amended version of the bill that passed the Senate committee, because the earlier version would preserve good will by allowing Native Hawaiian rights to be negotiated instead of imposed.

December 25: Honolulu Star-Bulletin and other newspapers affiliated with Associated Press (including The Fresno Bee) report on President Obama's arrival in Kailua at his rented vacation home, and the presence of roadside protesters holding signs opposing the Akaka bill.

December 26: Letter to editor says if assimilationists who oppose the Akaka bill succeed in defeating it, they risk the wrath of the United Nations for violating the rights of an indigenous people.

December 31, 2009: Inouye confident Akaka Bill issues will be resolved. Discussions ongoing with Hawaii Governor regarding changes in the bill.

END OF INDEX OF NEWS REPORTS AND COMMENTARIES FROM SEPTEMBER 1, 2009 THROUGH DECEMBER 31, 2009. Washington Times Sept 8 editorial blasts Akaka bill. Congressman Abercrombie announces he will resign in a few weeks to run for Governor, but waiting until important Congressional business is done. House and Senate committees suddenly schedule markup meetings and votes. ZOGBY POLL SHOWS HAWAII PEOPLE STRONGLY OPPOSE THE BILL AND WANT HEARINGS IN HAWAII. DEC. 16 ABERCROMBIE TRIED TO RAM DANGEROUS MAJOR AMENDMENTS THROUGH HOUSE COMMITTEE MARKUP AT LAST MINUTE, BUT HAWAII GOVERNOR AND ATTORNEY GENERAL FOUND OUT AND STRONGLY PROTESTED, SO ABERCROMBIE BACKED OFF AND THE UNAMENDED VERSION PASSED EASILY. DEC. 17 SENATE COMMITTEE PASSED THE VERSION INCLUDING THE DANGEROUS AMENDMENTS.
Full text of these items above is available at
http://www.angelfire.com/big09a/AkakaHist111Sept2009.html

=================

INDEX OF INDEX OF NEWS REPORTS AND COMMENTARIES FROM JANUARY 1, 2010 THROUGH FEBRUARY 28, 2010. OHA and Hawaii Attorney General propose amendments to the amended version of the Akaka bill which had passed the Senate committee in December. There is at least one Republican hold on the bill in the Senate. Rep Abercrombie created a new version of the bill during February recess, basically the same as the radical version that passed the Senate committee. Abercrombie version passed the House 245-164 on February 23 despite opposition from Governor Lingle, the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights, and dozens of commentators in national publications.
Full text of these items below is available at
http://www.angelfire.com/big09a/AkakaHist111Jan2010.html

January 1, 2010: (1) OHA website publishes a very helpful side-by-side comparison of the substitute (amended) version of S.1011 passed by the Senate committee vs. the unamended H.R.2314 passed by the House committee on December 16.; (2) OHA trustee Boyd Mossman publishes editorial in OHA monthly newspaper saying "Now, on the verge of passage, changes in the bill made without the knowledge of OHA and not in accordance with our position have surfaced in Washington, D.C., which threaten to again impede passage." Mossman laments that if the bill fails, ethnic Hawaiians will lose their government benefits and their identity as an indigenous people in their ancestral homeland.

January 2: While President Obama vacations in Hawaii, roadside protesters near his rental house hold signs opposing the Akaka bill and demanding hearings on it.

Jan 4: (1) Protesters in front of President Obama's rented house in Kailua tried hard to give a packet of materials to security guards to deliver to Obama, but the guards refused to accept it and there was no way for anything to be delivered. The packet included a petition with thousands of names opposing the Akaka bill, and a demand that hearings on the Akaka bill should be held in Hawaii; (2) Hawaii Representative Neil Abercrombie announced that his last day as a Representative will be February 28, when he will resign to run for Governor. He said he expects his work on the Akaka bill to be finished by then.

Jan 5: (1) The Washington Times newspaper published a lengthy news report on the Akaka bill pro and con, including expected costs and Senator Akaka downplaying the [major!] changes he made to the bill in mid-December.; (2) OHA news release announces two upcoming hour-long TV infomercials on the Akaka bill; (3) Honolulu Advertiser immediately publishes a "breaking news" report on the OHA infomercials

Jan 6: (1) Ilya Shapiro (Constitutional law expert at the CATO institute) says passage of the Akaka bill would actually damage the Hawaiian racial entitlement programs the bill is intended to protect, because the bill is unconstitutional and will attract litigation; (2) Honolulu Star-Bulletin publishes short summary of OHA news release about 2 upcoming Akaka bill infomercials. [OHA also paid for a full-page ad for the TV infomercials, on page 2 of the print edition]

Jan 11: Senators Inouye and Akaka say they expect Congress will take up the Akaka bill quite soon; as discussions continue with Hawaii's Governor and Attorney General who have opposed the new version.

Jan 12: Andrew Walden analyzes the pervasive Communist ideology that shaped Barack Obama's mind as he grew up in Hawaii, and which, Walden says, also underlies the Akaka bill.

Jan 13: 2 letters to editor call for OHA to give funding to Akaka bill opposition so their views can be heard, and for hearings on the bill to be held on all islands.

Jan 14: "Indian Country Today" reviews the events of mid-December resulting in the Akaka bill passing House and Senate committees in two different versions.

Jan 15: (1) OHA website offers audio/video replays of the two hour-long TV infomercials on the Akaka bill; (2) "Indian Country Today" commentary by Hawaiian independence activist briefly describes both versions of the Akaka bill and says both are inadequate remedies for restoring real Hawaiian sovereignty.

Jan 18: Very important remarks opposing the Akaka bill's racism were delivered by Jere Krischel in a speech at a Grassroot Institute forum on the Akaka bill on Friday Jan. 15, and reprinted in Hawaii Reporter on Monday Jan 18. The 10-minute speech by Jere Krischel, and a 10-minute speech at the same event by ethnic Hawaiian activist Leon Siu, are available as podcasts.

Jan 20: (1) Honolulu Advertiser reports (falsely) that there are no Republican holds on the Akaka bill, but the clock is ticking to get it on the crowded schedule in the Senate; (2) Letter in Maui News says 1/3 of ethic Hawaiians support the Akaka bill in hopes of personal gain, 1/3 oppose it because it fails to give full sovereignty, and 1/3 oppose it because they are happy to be Americans.

Jan 21: Despite the election of Republican Scott Brown as a U.S. Senator from Massachusetts, Hawaii Senators Inouye and Akaka remain confident they have enough votes to pass the Akaka bill, because all Democrats and some Republicans favor it.

Jan 23: Honolulu Star-Bulletin editorial entitled "Political winds bode ill for future of Akaka Bill" because of Massachusetts victory by Republican candidate for U.S. Senate and because of amendments to the bill inserted suddenly and secretly.

Jan 28: (1) OHA AND HAWAII ATTORNEY GENERAL BENNETT PROPOSE AMENDMENTS TO THE AMENDED VERSION OF THE AKAKA BILL WHICH PASSED THE SENATE COMMITTEE IN DECEMBER (LINKS PROVIDED TO SUMMARIES AND TEXT OF AMENDMENTS); (2) Letter to editor opposes Akaka bill saying: "Why have we native Hawaiians allowed another culture (American) to determine our self determination? We keep allowing the thieves into our house, only to be told by the thieves, "Let's vote to decide if we (the thieves) will be allowed to stay.""

Jan 31: Lengthy article about Jade Danner (sister of Robin, and Vice President of Council for Native Hawaiian Advancement [Robin is President]) and her reasons for wanting the amended Senate version of the Akaka bill to pass without any of the 30 additional amendments proposed in an agreement between OHA and Attorney General Bennett.

February 1: Three editorials by OHA trustees published in the OHA monthly newspaper: (1) Boyd P. Mossman, Trustee, Maui: "We need to act now on the Akaka Bill"; (2) Walter M. Heen, Trustee, O'ahu: "The Real World" [grab what we can get while we can get it, even if it's less than the secession we really want]; (3) Robert K. Lindsey, Jr., Trustee, Hawaii Island: copied full text of letter from Robin Danner, President of Council for Hawaiian Advancement, to Governor Lingle urging her to change her mind and support the amended version passed by the Senate committee.

Feb 2: Reliable sources say Sen. Jim DeMint has placed a hold on the Akaka bill, which will stop the bill from passing on a stand-alone basis unless there are 60 votes to break the filibuster -- a process that would require a week of delay and further debate on the bill and amendments.

Feb 5: (1) Article entitled "Akaka Bill Falters in Congress" describes events of the past two months; (2) Letter warns don't think Akaka bill is merely symbolic, and notes bill in legislature to transfer all the ceded lands to the Akaka tribe when it is recognized.

Feb 10: Ilya Shapiro, editor-in-chief of the libertarian Cato Supreme Court Review, and University of Hawaii-Manoa law professor Jon Van Dyke, debate the Akaka bill at UH law school.

Feb 13: 24-minute YouTube video interview of secessionist Leon Siu regarding his participation in the Grassroot Institute forum on the Akaka bill, and also embracing the collaboration between the independence movement and patriotic American civil rights activists in opposing the Akaka bill on account of the bill's racism and its secretiveness.

Feb 14: Bills in Hawaii Legislature proposing gambling include a bill for gambling on the Hawaiian Homelands, which raises questions about the claim by Senators Akaka and Inouye that the Akaka bill would prohibit gambling by the Akaka tribe.

Feb 17: House Democrats Plan to Push Akaka Bill Through Before Abercrombie Retirement – But the Legislation’s Final Draft is Still Secret

Feb 18 (1) NEW VERSION OF AKAKA BILL DRAFTED BY REP. ABERCROMBIE IS EXPECTED TO BE SUBSTITUTED INTO H.R.2314 NEXT WEEK AND WILL THEN BE RAMMED THROUGH THE HOUSE. TEXT OF ABERCROMBIE SUBSTITUTE IS AT
http://big09a.angelfire.com/AkakaHR2314AbercrombieSubstituteFeb2010.pdf
(2) U.S. House Committee on Natural Resources, Minority (Republican) Press release warning Akaka bill likely to be rammed through next week, and deploring the bill itself along with the secrecy of the process; (3) Hawaii Legislators Believe Establishing Casinos on Native Hawaiian Homelands Would Not Contradict the Akaka Bill; (4) Questions about the Akaka bill: Would the Tribal Chief of the Akaka Tribe live in Iolani Palace? Would he or she take over the State of Hawaii politically? That would make Hawaii the only state controlled by a tribe. What would all this Akaka Tribe activity do to Hawaii’s bond ratings? Where would the new Akaka Tribe lead you, your family, your job, your property, your happiness?

Feb 19: (1) "Congress Daily" reports that "House Republicans are upset that a Rules Committee hearing has been set for Monday on a bill to give native Hawaiians sovereign government status, saying the bill is little more than a going-away present for Rep. Neil Abercrombie, D-Hawaii, who is resigning at the end of the month to run for governor."; (2) Honolulu Advertiser (finally!) reports that the Akaka bill might go to the House floor next week, but reporter Gordon Pang reports incorrectly on which version of the bill was passed by the House committee; (3) Speech in the Hawaii Legislature by state Senator Sam Slom, opposing the Akaka bill and lamenting the secrecy surrounding it and lack of a vote by Hawaii's people; (4) Commentary by Ken Conklin responding to an ethnic Hawaiian whose essay lamented the decline of "pure Hawaiians" and infestation of Hawaii by "weeds" (newcomers with no native blood). Conklin notes "the Akaka bill will be based entirely on race and therefore will be headed by the most radical racial partisans -- they are the ones the rest of us must defend ourselves against."

Feb 21 and 22: Andrew Walden series of articles in Hawaii Free Press about new version of Akaka bill and language allowing exclusion or disenrollment of members. (1) Akaka preparing new Senate bill: House Rules Committee to consider Akaka bill Monday; (2) Updated essay: More than 73% of [ethnic] Hawaiians not 'qualified' for membership in Akaka tribe; (3) Extensive collection of photos and videos about evistion of tribal members from tribal reservations, and disenrollment of members for purposes of greed and political correctness.

Feb 22: (1) So-called "final version" of Akaka bill is placed on Senator Akaka's official website (slightly changed from Feb 18 draft by Rep Abercrombie); (2) 10th Anniversary of U.S. Supreme Court Decision in Rice v. Cayetano, published article and webpage describe 10 year struggle between civil rights activists seeking to abolish racial entitlements vs. Akaka bill seeking to protect them.; (3) National Review online publishes letter to Congressional leaders by U.S. Commission on Civil Rights reaffirming their letter of August 28, 2009 strngly opposing the Akaka bill, and now also adding opposition to the secretive process being used by the Hawaii delegation; (4) Honolulu Advertiser reports final text of Akaka bill now available, AND GOVERNOR LINGLE CONTINUES TO OPPOSE IT; (5) Honolulu Star-Bulletin reports final version now available, and quotes Senator Akaka saying "These clarifications represent a genuine effort to address the State's concerns while maintaining the original purpose of the bill: federal recognition for Native Hawaiians"; (6) STATEMENT BY GOVERNOR LINDA LINGLE THAT SHE OPPOSES THIS "FINAL" VERSION OF THE AKAKA BILL; (7) Roger Clegg brief statement opposing Akaka bill in National Review Online; (8) Kevin D. Williamson, in National Review Online, notes that the well-intentioned little Hawaiian apology resolution of 1993, together with well-intentioned nonprofit service organizations, has led to this terrible legislation: "Starts with a civic association, ends with a separatist movement. Bear that in mind next time MEChA is in the news."; (9) Honolulu Advertiser online poll got 4797 votes, with 58.7% opposing and only 30.7% favoring Akaka bill.

Feb 22 IMPORTANT DOCUMENTS FROM U.S. HOUSE COMMITTEE ON NATURAL RESOURCES REPUBLICANS OPPOSING THE BILL, AND FROM THE U.S. HOUSE COMMITTEE ON RULES FILING A 26-PAGE REPORT SUPPORTING THE BILL AND SETTING THE RULE FOR DEBATING THE BILL ON THE HOUSE FLOOR 1. Republican statement Feb 22 regarding possibility of a casino despite Akaka bill provision to the contrary
2. Republican press release Feb 22 Native Hawaiian Recognition Bill Creates Unconstitutional Race-Based Government
3. GOP.gov -- The website of the Republicans in Congress publishes lengthy and powerful essay summarizing "What Every Member Needs to Know About the Native Hawaiian Government Reorganization Act"
4. 3. Rules Committee results from Monday Feb 22:
a. Bill text newly printed
b. 26 page Natural Resources committee report includes Hawaiian history, legislative history of the bill, recorded votes of Committee on Natural Resources, legal analysis of bill's provisions, Congressional Budget Office cost estimate $1 Million annually 2010-2010 and $500,000 per year thereafter; dissenting views -- DON'T MISS PP. 19-26
c. Rules committee report on the rule (floor time, amendments, etc.) Including perhaps 90 minutes of floor debate including two Republican proposed amendments.

Feb 23 Before the House vote: (1) Honolulu Advertiser "U.S. House could act today on measure, despite governor's 'heavy-hearted' opposition" quotes from Lingle statement, and also says Attorney General Bennett called the new version "a formula for strife and litigation, not for negotiation and reconciliation."; (2) Honolulu Star-Bulletin reports "Lingle balks at rewrite of Akaka Bill. The governor says the measure has rules for Hawaiians and rules for "everybody else""... Clyde Namuo, Office of Hawaiian Affairs administrator, said he doubts the bill will pass the Senate without Lingle's support. "Having the governor's support is going to really make the difference, in my mind," Namuo said."; (3) National Review Online Editorial opposes Akaka bill; (4) National Review Online Editorial "Aloha Segregation"; Duncan Currie (National Review Online "Trouble in Paradise: Why the Native Hawaiian Government Reorganization Act deserves to fail." reviews Rice v. Cayetano, U.S. Commission on Civil Rights, Zogby poll, the issue of tribal inherent powers, etc.; (5) Doc Hastings, Ranking Member of U.S. House Natural Resources Committee: "Hawaiians deserve to vote, not just Congress" [the topic of his proposed amendment to Akaka bill]; (6) Text of two amendments to be offered by Republican Representatives Doc Hastings and Jeff Flake (and to be defeated by Democrats) (7) Peter Kirsanow, a Commissioner on the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights, published two short essays on National Review Online: (a) Ethnic Hawaiians are not actually comparable to Indian tribes, (b) "The bill is not only constitutionally defective and morally repugnant, but by logical extension it opens the door for members of other racial classifications to petition the government for sovereign status ... All congressmen who vote in favor of this odious bill should be questioned closely about their support of state-sponsored racial discrimination and juridical balkanization. That this bill could make it to the House floor for a vote is an abomination."; (8) Doc Hastings floor statement focusing on why the Abercrombie substitute should e opposed because it changes the whole nature of the bill.; (9) "Breaking News" in both Honolulu Advertiser and Honolulu Star-Bulletin reports that White House Press Secretary Robert Gibbs has said President Obama reaffirms his support for the Akaka bill.

===============

Here is the text of the bill that passed the House:
http://www.angelfire.com/big09a/AkakaHR2314RHPassedHouse022310.html
Here's how to find transcripts of the entire floor debate in the House, and the vote rollcall:
http://www.angelfire.com/big09a/AkakaCongRecHouse022310.html
Attention now shifts to the Senate, where a Republican filibuster is expected; but it is unknown when the bill will be scheduled.

================

Feb 23 after the House vote: (1) and (2) Both Honolulu newspapers report the Akaka bill passed the House, 245-164, and that White House Press Secretary confirms President Obama supports the bill, and Governor Lingle opposes it.; (3) Associated Press writer Kevin Freking has identical news reports in the Washington Post and KRDO TV 13 (Colorado Springs), and other media nationwide, reporting Akaka bill passed House largely along party lines, Obama supports it, Lingle opposes it.; (4) Senator Lamar Alexander press release "“In America, we say, ‘One nation, under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all’—not ‘Many nations, divided by race, with special privileges for some.’”"; (5) Senator Jim DeMint press release ""The House vote this evening is deeply disappointing. We should stand together in opposition to racially divisive and discriminatory laws like this. The Native Hawaiian bill is unconstitutional and violates the national unity of E Pluribus Unum. I will use all the tools available in the Senate to ensure that this bill does not become law.""; (6) Grassroot Institute of Hawaii press release lamenting passage of Akaka bill, remembering Zogby poll, thanking Governor Lingle for her courage.

Feb 24: (1) FoxNews reports House passage of Akaka bill and impact on Hawaii if if becomes law; (2) Honoluu Advertiser Gannet News; Honolulu Advertiser news as spun by Gordon Pang; (3) Honolulu Advertiser editorial "Put Akaka bill back on track, or it will die" calls radical provisions of the new version "a poison pill"; (4) Honolulu Star-Bulletin includes quotes from Sens Lamar Alexander and Jim DeMint; (5) John H. Fund (columnist for The Wall Street Journal) calls the bill "The Two-State Solution" (like Arab/Israel) and says "The Abercrombie bill is a profound mistake."; (6) New York Post columnist writes lengthy and strongly worded opposition entitled "Race-based gov't: the aloha land grab"; (7) Mike Brownfield, writer for The Heritage Foundation deplores the bill in essay entitled "A Separate, Race-Based Government for Native Hawaiians?"; (8) Kathryn Jean Lopez, National Review Online, reminds about Lamar Alexander and U.S. Commission on Civil Rights opposition; (9) Hawaii Tribune-Herald (Hilo) lengthy news report for Stephens Media Group headlined "Victory for Hawaiian sovereignty -- House OKs Akaka legislation, which now faces tough Senate battle"; (10) Heritage Foundation: "A Hawaiian Punch to the Constitution"; (11) Peter Kirsanow (U.S. Commission on Civil Rights) "Equal Protection Is for Flakes" (referring to Rep. Jeff Flake's proposed amendment); (12) "Technocrati" editor: "Hawai'i Wants Two Different Governments"

Feb. 25: (1) Honolulu Star-Bulletin Editorial "Akaka bill needs airing: (2) Radio New Zealand: "US House recognition raises expectations of native Hawaiians"; (3) Aleksandra Kulczuga (The Daily Caller) discusses the pros and cons of the Akaka bill; (4) Tamara Lytle (AOL News) describes the controversy over the Akaka bill, calls it "Queen Liliuokalani's revenge."

Feb. 26: (1) Robin Danner, head of the Council for Native Hawaiian Advancement, says "CNHA and its Native Hawaiian Policy Center will continue to engage members to support the NHGRA’s passage through the full Senate by delivering policy sessions on the Bill"; (2) Lengthy interview with ethnic Hawaiian secessionist filmmaker Anne Keala Kelly explains why she opposes Akaka bill; (3) Maui News letter says that at a recent public forum debating the Akaka bill (pro OHA vs. secessionists) at the community college, many people said they have not read the bill.

Feb 27: Wall Street Journal editorial: "Hawaiian Secession -- Dividing up the islands based on race."

Feb. 28: (1) Gail Heriot and Peter Kirsanow, both Commissioners on the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights, publish a major essay in the Wall Street Journal "Congress Tries to Break Hawaii in Two -- A racial spoils precedent that could lead to new 'tribal' demands across the U.S. ... This is a train that needs to be stopped before it leaves the station."; (2) Senator Akaka commentary in Honolulu Advertiser: "Sovereign immunity key for Hawaiians -- Native government will need equality in legal protection"

END OF INDEX OF INDEX OF NEWS REPORTS AND COMMENTARIES FROM JANUARY 1, 2010 THROUGH FEBRUARY 28, 2010. OHA and Hawaii Attorney General propose amendments to the amended version of the Akaka bill which had passed the Senate committee in December. There is at least one Republican hold on the bill in the Senate. Rep Abercrombie created a new version of the bill during February recess, basically the same as the radical version that passed the Senate committee. Abercrombie version passed the House 245-164 on February 23 despite opposition from Governor Lingle, the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights, and dozens of commentators in national publications.
Full text of these items above is available at
http://www.angelfire.com/big09a/AkakaHist111Jan2010.html

=================

INDEX OF History of the Hawaiian Government Reorganization bill from March 1, 2010 through April 30, 2010. Senate committee report accompanying Akaka bill is published. Governor Lingle sends letter to all 100 Senators reconfirming her strong objections to this version of the bill. Hawaii Republican Party platform committee removes decade-long support for Akaka bill. Honolulu City Council considers resolution to support Akaka bill but encounters strong testimony in opposition (See published article on April 27 which includes YouTube videos of entire 29 minutes spent on Akaka bill in the Council meeting).
Full text of these items below is available at
http://www.angelfire.com/big09a/AkakaHist111March2010.html

March 1, 2010: (1) The Hill (Washington D.C. newspaper focusing on Congress): Racism under the radar screen"; (2) Hawaii's Real Tsunami -- Many metaphors are needed to describe the horrors of the Akaka bill.; (3) Maui News poll: 25% support Akaka bill, 50% oppose it, 19% don't know enough to decide, 6% want changes in bill language.; (4) OHA trustee Boyd Mossman warns ethnic Hawaiians what they might lose if the Akaka bill fails, and urges them to "stay the course"; (5) OHA trustee Walter Heen describes the steps that will take place to implement the Akaka bill once it has passed.

March 2: Honolulu Star-Bulletin letter says broadcasts and sirens warned about the approaching tsunami, but the Akaka bill would be a worse disaster than any tsunami.

March 3: (1) Michael Barone, Senior Political Analyst for The Washington Examiner newspaper: "Will Senate say aloha to racial discrimination?" Barone concludes "The Democratic health care bills threaten one-sixth of the nation's economy. The Akaka bill threatens something even more precious, the progress we have made as a nation toward racial equality."; (2) Letter by Garry Smith in Honolulu Star-Bulletin: "Akaka bill offers more than parity"; (3) Letter by Ken Conklin in West Hawaii Today (Kona): "Akaka bill -- the real tsunami"; (4) Richard Rowland letter in Honolulu Reporter: "Animal Farm."

March 5: (1) Commentary in "Human Events" notes that Governor Lingle opposes Akaka bill; says the bill might be dead for this year; says Abercrombie likely to be governor in 2011 which would be the bill's best chance except that Congress might lose Democrat majorities.; (2) Commentary in Newsmax.com notes that "Native Hawaiians, unlike American Indians, would not have their special rights and immunities from state and federal jurisdiction limited to within a specific territory such as is the case with American Indian reservations, but would cover them wherever they live within the United States." and "keep in mind that 40 percent of Native Hawaiians don't even live in Hawaii."

March 6: Honolulu Star-Bulletin online poll on the Akaka bill ran for 6 days, and ended with cumulative results 84.4% opposed and only 15.6% in favor.

March 7: Two letters in "Maui News" say the Hawaii is like the old South and is about preserving a way of life; and Akaka bill is a form of genocide as was done to the Indians.

March 13: A lengthy Associated Press commentary disguised as a news report, and distributed nationwide, begins by saying "Their kingdom long ago overthrown, Native Hawaiians seeking redress are closer than they've ever been to reclaiming a piece of Hawaii. Native Hawaiians are the last remaining indigenous group in the United States that hasn't been allowed to establish their own government, a right already extended to Alaska Natives and 564 Native American tribes." and continues downhill from there.

March 14: (1) Letter to editor by Viet Nam war veteran says he could forgive Gubernatorial candidate Abercrombie's anti-war activism but can never forgive Abercrombie's pushing the Akaka bill; (2) Commentary by OHA trustee disagrees with letter from two members of U.S. Commission on Civil Rights who oppose Akaka bill.

March 15: (1) Commentary in "American Spectator" says "Hawaii, the 50th state will become the 49.6th state if S.1011, a bill creating the Native Hawaiian Government Reorganization Act, passes the Senate." Includes quotes from Senator Akaka and OHA regarding possible secession.; (2) OHA chair Haunani Apoliona commentary in Honolulu Advertiser supports the new version of the Akaka bill that passed the House, and describes some of the changes included in it.

March 17: (1) "Midweek" columnist Bob Jones, after 10 years of vacillating and hesitancy, finally comes out against the Akaka bill; (2) Editorial favoring the Akaka bill in the student newspaper of Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University makes major errors; (3) Letter in Hilo newspaper says Akaka bill would be disastrous but ethic Hawaiians deserve government handouts.

March 18: (1) Letter in Grassroot Institute blog notes backroom deals being made on Akaka bill, and wonders why Obama wants to force Hawaiians into the terrible situation of Indian tribes; (2) Letter in Hilo newspaper notes Queen Liliuokalani was corrupt and tried to overthrow the Kingdom's Constitution, and letter also notes that Akaka bill would set a precedent for forcing the return to Mexico of the several states taken from Mexico in the 1800s; (3) Letter in Molokai newspaper says Hawaiians deserve to be treated as indigenous; (4) Hawaiian independence activist cites the anti-annexation petition from 1887 and numerous independence groups to oppose Akaka bill.

March 19: Letter in Maui News says when the Hawaiian monarchy was overthrown, ethnic Hawaiians as a racial group did not own the crown or government lands, and most residents of the Kingdom had no native blood; therefore the Akaka bill has no justification.

March 20: (1) Letter in Honolulu Advertiser says amended version of Akaka bill that passed the House is terribly overreaching and doomed to be defeated; (2) Letter in Maui News demands local hearings on Akaka bill and says the Akaka bill is race-based whereas the Kingdom was not.

March 22: National Review article "Aloha Segregation" concludes "Senator Akaka's ethnic mania deserves not just opposition, but scorn."

March 23: Letter says Akaka Bill offers reconciliation, but not remedy for historical grievances.

March 24: (1) Hawaii Governor Linda Lingle letter to all 100 U.S. Senators reaffirming her reasons for opposing the current version of the Akaka bill; (2) Senate Indian Affairs Committee report accompanying the Akaka bill is now available, including statements of opposition from Republicans, including a conclusion by Sen. Coburn saying there are dozens of Senators who will filibuster against it; (3) Honolulu Star-Bulletin "breaking news" about Lingle's opposition; (4) Honolulu Advertiser's "breaking news" about Lingle's opposition; (5) Lengthy commentary in "The Epoch News" describes the Akaka bill and its historical justification from the perspective of the bill's supporters.

March 25: Honolulu Advertiser and Star Bulletin report Governor Lingle's letter to the Senate opposing current version of the Akaka bill, and also report responses by Senators Akaka and Inouye, who made it clear they are moving forward despite the Governor's opposition.

March 26: Hawaii's Lieutenant Governor James "Duke" Aiona (Republican) issues a press release announcing that he would prefer the earlier version of the Akaka bill, but he will support the current version as well (thus opposing Governor Lingle's position).

March 27: (1) AP news report in HOnolulu Star-Bulletin describes Lieutenant Governor Aiona's support for whatever version of the Akaka bill is pushed forward; (2) Honolulu Advertiser takes the same AP news report and spins it to suit reporter Gordon Pang; (3) Hilo radio station reports that OHA is very pleased with Aiona's support for Akaka bill.

March 28: Honolulu Star-Bulletin editorial says the Akaka bill should be restored to its "original version" (meaning the version before the December amended versions were passed by their committees).

March 30: Honolulu Advertiser columnist Lee Cataluna (daughter of OHA trustee Don Cataluna and wife of Advertiser editorial page editor Jim Kelly) praises Lieutenant Governor Ainoa, candidate for Governor, for is courage in breaking free from Governor Lingle and supporting the latest version of the Akaka bill.

April 1: OHA trustee Walter Heen wrote an article as his monthly column in the OHA newspaper, entitled "To Be Or Not To Be?" He explained that after the Akaka bill passes there will be difficult negotiations with the State of Hawaii regarding the transfer of lands to OHA; and without land there is no nation.

April 3: Hawaii Republican Party platform committee removes decade-long support for Akaka bill.

April 6: Associated Press news report about the Hawaii GOP platform committee action is published in three Hawaii newspapers under three different headlines which spin the same article in three different ways:
Advertiser: "GOP eliminating 'pro-Akaka' point -- Proposed platform changed; Aiona says he still backs bill";
Star-Bulletin: "Isle GOP's platform drops some language on Hawaiians";
Maui: State GOP panel pulls Akaka Bill provision.

April 7: Major article in "Indian Country Today" says "Akaka Bill passage questioned as opposition mounts" and takes note of strong opposition among ethnic Hawaiians.

April 9: Honolulu Advertiser article describes an hour-long televised informal discussion (debate) among the three candidates in the special election to replace Neil Abercrombie in Congress. Charles Djou and Ed Case both ppose the latest version of the Akaka bill although they support the general concept of federal recognition for ethnic Hawaiians. Colleen Hanabusa likes the latest version. Case also said he would like to see further discussion about the Akaka bill in Hawaii (local formal hearings?) before the bill gets enacted.

April 12: Advertiser columnist Dave Shapiro says "Revised Akaka bill unsettles Isle GOP"

April 14: Letter in Maui News says "Akaka Bill sets participants up for failure"

April 15: Letter to editor by OHA's CEO Clyde Namu'o responding to Dave Shapiro's commentary of April 12.

April 16: Honolulu City Council will be considering whether to pass a resolution to support the Akaka bill. News report includes text of resolution, reasons why it is important, and how to submit written and/or oral testimony.

April 17: Honolulu Star-Bulletin's weekly Hawaiian-language column explains why the Akaka bill should be rejected. Synopsis: The Akaka Bill seeks to whitewash history by denying the sovereign status of the Hawaiian Kingdom in contradiction to treaties between the Kingdom and the U.S. and the Cleveland-Lili'uokalani Agreement. It also seeks to turn a national issue into an ethnic one.

April 19: Grassroot Institute President Emeritus Dick Rowland analyzes the April 12 and April 15 essays by Dave Shapiro and Clyde Namu'o, raising the questions "Which person outlines the bigger issue? Which of these two stands to gain power, money, etc if the Akaka bill becomes law?"

April 21: (1) Ken Conklin article in Hawaii Reporter includes a summary of 10 major points against the Akaka bill and link to his detailed testimony on each point submitted to Honolulu City Council regarding its resolution on the Akaka bill; (2) Honolulu Star-Bulletin breaking news reports that City Council voted 8-1 to pass the Akaka bill resolution, and reasons why Councilman Gary Okino was opposed.

April 27: Ken Conklin article in Hawaii Reporter describes the 29 minutes of testimony and discussion on the Akaka bill that took place at the Honolulu City Council meeting of April 21, including three 10-minute YouTube videos covering the entire 29 minutes.

April 28: The Honolulu Weekly has a cover story about one of the 14 candidates running in the special election to replace retired Congressman Neil Abercrombie; the candidate opposes the Akaka bill and is endorsed by Hawaiian secessionists.

END OF INDEX OF History of the Hawaiian Government Reorganization bill from March 1, 2010 through April 30, 2010. Senate committee report accompanying Akaka bill is published. Governor Lingle sends letter to all 100 Senators reconfirming her strong objections to this version of the bill. Hawaii Republican Party platform committee removes decade-long support for Akaka bill. Honolulu City Council considers resolution to support Akaka bill but encounters strong testimony in opposition (See published article on April 27 which includes YouTube videos of entire 29 minutes spent on Akaka bill in the Council meeting).
Full text of these items above is available at
http://www.angelfire.com/big09a/AkakaHist111March2010.html

=================

INDEX OF History of the Hawaiian Government Reorganization bill from May 1 through August 31, 2010. Huge White House briefing in June for Akaka bill lobbyists confirms Obama will sign the bill when Senate passes it. Akaka/Inouye being advised to hurry up and pass the bill. Inouye and Lingle make compromise -- Akaka bill will be amended to accommodate Lingle's objections, and Lingle will send letter to all Senators announcing her support for it. Ryan William Nohea Garcia, a newly minted lawyer who is ethnic Hawaiian, published a heavily footnoted 78-page article ripping the Akaka bill, in the Asian-Pacific Law & Policy Journal.
Full text of these items below is available at
http://www.angelfire.com/big09a/AkakaHist111May2010.html

May 1, 2010: 4 important commentaries in the OHA monthly newspaper for May: (1) Hawaii Lieutenant Governor James 'Duke' Aiona says he wants Congress to pass the current version of the Akaka bill even though it has problems and he knows there will be difficult negotiations and protracted litigation afterward; (2) OHA trustee Rowena Akaka briefly reviews the 10-year history of the Akaka bill and supports its passage because failure of the bill would result in continuing litigation against race-based entitlements; (3) OHA trustee and Vice Chair Walter Heen, a retired judge, completely supports the latest version of the Akaka bill because it will immediately give sovereignty to the Akaka tribe before negotiations, even though the Governor and Attorney General oppose it for that reason; OHA trustee Boyd Mossman, a retired judge, supports the current version of the bill even though it was sprung upon OHA trustees by surprise.

May 2: Honolulu Star-Bulletin publishes the views on the Akaka bill by all 14 candidates in the upcoming special election for Congress (to replace Rep. Abercrombie who retired to run for Governor).

May 3: (1) Honolulu Advertiser says a new poll by Ward Research shows 66% of Hawaii people approve the Akaka bill; (2) Ken Conklin article in Hawaii Reporter compares credibility of Zogby poll and Ward poll, concludes the best poll would be a ballot question, and describes how the Akaka bill could be amended to require such a ballot question be passed before anything in the bill could take effect; (3) TV news reports OHA/Advertiser poll on Akaka bill, and lengthy reply from Hawaii Attorney General mark Bennett explaining his opposition to the current version of the bill and noting that the wording of the question probably prompted the favorable response in the poll.

May 4: (1) Honolulu Star-Bulletin news report on May 3 TV Akaka bill debate says "Three candidates running in the special election for the 1st Congressional District seat agreed native Hawaiians should receive some form of federal recognition similar to American Indians. But City Councilman Charles Djou and former U.S. Rep. Ed Case said they opposed the federal recognition bill pending in the U.S. Senate, while state Senate President Colleen Hanabusa supports it."; (2) Commentary says the Ward poll on Akaka bill released yesterday was misleading because the question asked merely whether Native Hawaiians should be recognized as indigenous people rather than asking whether they should have a sovereign race-based government.

May 9: (1) Letter to editor says there's no reason to trust that negotiations called for in Akaka bill will produce fair and reasonable results; therefore, negotiations should come first, before passing the bill.; (2) Andrew Walden commentary: "Hawaii's new political reality: Akaka Bill becomes an election issue."

May 10: The OHA poll on the Akaka bill (see May 3) asked a "mom and apple pie" question to which well-meaning people would automatically answer yes, but that is not the real question posed by the Akaka bill.

May 14: The Akaka bill purports to help ethnic Hawaiians; but do the existing Hawaiians-only programs actually help them?

May 19: Letter to editor, and new webpage, says that ethnic Hawaiians should not serve as high officials in the state or county governments because passage of the Akaka bill would create a conflict of interest for ethnic Hawaiian officials who would decide how much government money, land, and jurisdictional authority to give away to their own blood brotherhood. For a webpage exploring in depth the issue of ethnic Hawaiian conflict of interest and recusal, see
http://tinyurl.com/24ohwpw

May 24: Same letter as May 19, with different editing, published in Honolulu Star-Bulletin

May 26: A more detailed version of the May 19 letter, including section headings from the related webpage

May 28: "Akaka Bill: The Big Gamble" (guest editorial discussing the fact that the Akaka bill's alleged prohibition on tribal gambling might not actually be effective)

June 1: OHA monthly newspaper includes twi irems on the Akaka bill: (1) A brief greeting from CEO Clyde Namu'o, says the Akaka bill "is up for final passage by the U.S. Congress" and "Once NHGRA becomes law, the Office of Hawaiian Affairs (OHA) will provide information and act as a liaison, facilitating an open, fair, democratic and inclusive process in which a Native Hawaiian governing entity will be reorganized – by, and for, Native Hawaiians."; (2) Trustee Walter Heen (a retired judge) describes "Negotiations with the state and federal governments after formation and recognition of the Native Hawaiian Governing Entity" saying they will be difficult and contentious.

June 11: Two articles in honor of Kamehameha Day: (1) Haunani Apoliona, chair of OHA, notes that Kamehameha unified all the Hawaiian islands and says that the work of unification will continue through passage of the Akaka bill; (2) Ken Conklin notes that the Hawaiian Kingdom was multiracial in its founding and thriving but the Akaka bill is racially divisive -- "What Kamehameha hath joined together, let not Akaka rip asunder."

June 19: Letter says "Congress intends to take away the kingdom's sovereignty and assets by gaining forgiveness for keeping stolen property while repairing nothing, compensating no one and denying kanaka maoli any chance whatsoever of restoring themselves or kingdom property to its rightful owners."

June 22: Elaine WWillman, President of Citizens Equal Rights Alliance, writes "Indian Casinos – The NEW Industry that is ‘Too Big To Fail!’" and specifically mentions the need to defeat the Akaka bill.

June 28: Newsmax reports that following the death of Senator Harry Byrd, Hawaii Senator Dan Inouye is now President ProTem of the Senate and is 3rd in the line of succession to the Presidency. And he favors racial separatism which would affect not only Hawaii but all of America.

July 1, 2010: OHA monthly newspaper for July contains 4 articles focused on the Akaka bill: (1) CEO Clyde Namu'o describes major lobbying activity in Washington D.C. surrounding ceremonies in June for Kamehameha Day, including a historic White House briefing on Native Hawaiian issues, where a White House official reaffirmed that President Obama is ready to sign the bill after approval by the U.S. Senate.; (2) Sarah Peters (intern in OHA’s Washington, D.C., bureau) describes in detail the White House briefing, including names of institutions and individuals who participated; (3) OHA chair Haunani Apoliona describes the Washington lobbying and White House briefing, with extensive excerpts from her speech outlining work to be done after the Akaka bill passes; (4) OHA trustee Walter Heen describes the personal decisions each ethnic Hawaiian must make after the Akaka bill passes.

July 2: (1) HONOLULU STAR-ADVERTISER FRONT PAGE HEADLINE STORY reports that Senator Akaka has been advised he should not delay pushing the Akaka bill, and he has been advised to amend it to get support from Governor Lingle and some Republican Senators; (2) Andrew Walden, Hawaii Free Press, analyzes the Star-Advertiser report.

July 2: (1) HONOLULU STAR-ADVERTISER FRONT PAGE HEADLINE STORY reports that Senator Akaka has been advised he should not delay pushing the Akaka bill, and he has been advised to amend it to get support from Governor Lingle and some Republican Senators; (2) Andrew Walden, Hawaii Free Press, analyzes the Star-Advertiser report.

July 7, 2010: A compromise was reached between Senator Inouye and Governor Lingle whereby the Akaka bill will be amended to accommodate Lingle's objections, and Lingle will send a letter to all Senators expressing her support for the bill. 7 news reports are provided, some of which contradict others, especially regarding the question whether the Akaka tribe will have full sovereignty immediately or only after negotiations with the State.

July 8: (1) Hawaii Reporter describes the compromise, and gives at least some of the actual language in the amendment as provided to the newspaper by Governor Lingle; (2) Honolulu Star-Advertiser front-page headline news report which supposedly consolidates its two conflicting breaking news stories from the previous day; (3) Honolulu Star-Advertiser editorial says "it's do-or-die" time so let's get going; (4) Andrew Walden article "Amended Akaka Bill: A Trojan horse for Tribal immunity?" says the Lingle/Inouye amended bill might be passed in the Senate but then, during the House-Senate conference to agree on final language the House version which Lingle opposed would simply replace the compromise version anyway and thus Lingle's support would have been purchased for zero cost to what Akaka/Inouye really want.

July 9: (1) Article in both the Hilo and Kona newspapers reports the Akaka bill compromise and includes reactions from some residents of Hawaii island; (2) Letter by sovereignty activist in Honolulu Star-Advertiser says "The amendments to the Akaka Bill are ludicrous. Under the amended version, Hawaiians have no control of their national lands or natural resources and they cannot challenge the United States for the illegal overthrow of the Kingdom of Hawaii during 1893."

July 11: Letter says "Rushed Akaka Bill will cause Hawaii discord"

July 13: (1) Governor Linda Lingle news release and full text of letter she wrote to all 100 U.S. Senators announcing her support for Akaka bill with amendments she recently negotiated; (2) Honolulu Star-Bulletin breaking news report about Lingle's letter; (3) KITV news report

July 14: (1) Honolulu Star-Advertiser print edition reports "Lingle declares Akaka Bill support -- A letter to the U.S. Senate comes after Akaka and Inouye vow to amend the measure"; (2) Star-Advertiser commentator says the Hawaiian independence movement has no chance of succeeding, whereas the Akaka bill offers real protections to ethnic Hawaiians.

July 15: (1) Letter to editor from ethnic Hawaiian former Hawaii state Senator tells why he favored the original Akaka bill 10 years ago, opposed it starting 6 years ago, supported the radical version that passed the House this year, and opposes the amended version in the compromise between Inouye and Lingle; (2) Senator Inouye is trying to woo the 4 Republican Senators who are female, to support the Akaka bill: Maine Senators Collins and Snowe, Texas Senator Hutchison, Alaska Senator Murkowski.

July 16: (1) OHA trustees vote to support the Lingle/Inouye amended version of the Akaka bill -- two somewhat different news reports in the Hilo and Kona newspapers; (2) An online petition opposing the Akaka bill is announced.

July 17: (1) RedState Insider [a conservative Republican opinion journal] severely criticizes Senator Lisa Murkowski (Republican of Alaska), who is up for re-election, on account of her co-sponsorship of the Akaka bill; (2) Letter to editor of Honolulu Star-Advertiser opposes Akaka bill because ethnic Hawaiians are fully assimilated and have no history comparable to the Indians living separate and apart from surrounding non-Indians.

July 19: (1) Article discusses Hawaii history and politics, asking "Will The U.S. Congress Succeed in Institutionalizing Racism Where A Monarchy Failed?"; (2) Lengthy Associated Press article, nationally syndicated, says "Vote on Native Hawaiian government coming soon -- Inouye to push for Senate action by August recess" and describes the three main views; (3) Heritage Foundation director of Senate relations says "Thank you President Obama" for unifying Republicans and Tea Party activists against the "racist bill for Native Hawaiians."

July 21: (1) Former Hawaii Governor John D. Waihee III newspaper commentary uses all the usual platitudes to support the Akaka bill; (2) Letter to editor supports Akaka bill because "it gives federal recognition to Hawaiians as an indegenous group in America ... they deserve compensation. Lands conducive toward farming should be given to Native Hawaiians. Then they can go back to the lands and farm taro and sweet potatoes."

July 23: Leon Siu, a Hawaiian ethnic nationalist, who personally lobbied against the Akaka bill in Washington D.C. during the cloture attempt in June 2006, explains why he thinks chances of passing the bill this year are "slim to none."

July 26: (1) Lieutenant Governor Aiona, Republican candidate for Governor: "The state, he said, should not be discriminating against or favoring any group ... [But] passage of the Akaka Bill in Congress, speeding up ceded-land payments and encouraging the work of the state Department of Hawaiian Home Lands would be priorities for him."; (2) TV news reports that the Department of Hawaiian Homelands is supporting the Akaka bill; (3) Newspaper online "breaking news" reports DHHL support for Akaka bill, including a few details not reported the following day in the print edition.

July 27: Newspaper reports the Department of Hawaiian Homelands supports the Akaka bill because "It gives us that right to exist. But most importantly, it also helps to protect our trust and our trust assets moving forward."

July 30 (1) Honolulu Star-Advertiser political commentator says time is growing sort, and the Senate calendar is crowded. If the Akaka bill has nor passed by the August recess (1 more week), it might be all over.; (2) Letter to editor by UH Professor Lilikala Kame'eleihiwa says passing Akaka bill would bring peace to Hawaii.

August 1: (1) Walter Heen, OHA trustee, attacks a letter from 12 Senators opposing the Akaka bill on grounds that it would be contrary to color blindness and race neutrality; (2) Boyd Mossman, OHA trustee, attacks the usual meaning of "e pluribus unum" as inappropriate to the need for a distinctive identity for ethnic Hawaiians.

August 3: Leon Siu message to Senators says most Hawaii people, both native and non-native, oppose the Akaka bill; and cites a petition containing hundreds of signatures which he enclosed with the message and which is available online.

August 6: Grassroot Institute intern who is ethnic Hawaiian opposes Akaka bill for many reasons, including Hawaiian history different from Native American history.

August 9: SENATOR INOUYE COMMENTARY IN HONOLULU STAR-ADVERTISER briefly describes four changes to the House-passed version of the bill and says there's still plenty of time to pass it, but he does not provide actual text of the allegedly revised bill.

August 11: John Carroll, candidate for Governor in the upcoming Republican Party primary election, opposes the Akaka bill because it does not respect the proud history of Hawaii as a multiracial Kingdom, or its potential for the future.

===========

August 11, 12, 13: (1) Senator Akaka's official U.S. Senate webpage posts a pdf file containing the 60-page amended version of the Akaka bill as agreed to with Governor Lingle, and an explanation on his webpage says the amended version will be substituted for the version of H.R.2314 which passed the House, at the time when H.R.2314 is called to the Senate floor for debate; (2) Honolulu Star-Advertiser publishes short AP news report saying time is tight to pass the bill but Senator Akaka says he has the votes; (3) Group of 3 TV news stations report the same news but also add "Akaka spokesman Jesse Broder Van Dyke says most Democratic and a few Republican senators would vote for the measure, giving it more than the 60 votes needed."; (4) Native American Times published a much longer version of the same AP news report, including "In addition, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nevada, has committed to find time on the Senate's schedule to bring it to the floor this year, said Clyde Namuo, chief executive officer for the state Office of Hawaiian Affairs." and also "The Senate returns to session from Sept. 13 to Oct. 8, from Nov. 15 to Nov. 19, and then from Nov. 29 until it concludes business."

===========

August 13: Indian Country Today says "Hawaiian recognition alive for vote this year" and "Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nevada, has committed to find time on the Senate's schedule to bring it to the floor this year, said Clyde Namuo, chief executive officer for the state Office of Hawaiian Affairs."

August 16: Major essay by Ken Conklin describing "Akaka bill maneuvers coming up from September through December 2010" compares stealth tactics likely to occur in 2010 with stealth tactics which actually happened in 2000, 2001, and 2006 including the introduction of a decoy bill days before cloture was called on a previous version, attaching the Akaka bill as a rider to other bills, and burying the Akaka bill by reference as a single sentence deep inside a huge appropriations bill.

August 25: Leon Siu, "Minister of Foreign Affairs for the Hawaiian Kingdom", publishes lengthy article in "Indian Country Today." Siu claims Hawaii was never rightfully removed from the U.S. list of non-self-governing territories, and the main purpose of Akaka bill is to put Hawaii even more firmly under the thumb of the U.S. at a time when the U.N. is pressuring the U.S. to set free its overseas colonies American Samoa, Guam, Puerto Rico and the US Virgin Islands.

August 27: Ryan William Nohea Garcia publishes a major article in the Asian-Pacific Law & Policy Journal analyzing historical and legal issues regarding the Akaka bill. He says courts might reject it because the Kingdom government was multiracial but the bill would establish a governing entity based on race.

August 28: Kaupena Wong, a Native Hawaiian who has great respect for his knowledge of Hawaiian culture and history, published a letter to editor saying "In celebration this month of Hawaii's 51st anniversary of statehood, I urge that the Native Hawaiian Government Reorganization Act of 2009 be withdrawn from Congress."

END OF INDEX OF History of the Hawaiian Government Reorganization bill from May 1 through August 31, 2010. Huge White House briefing in June for Akaka bill lobbyists confirms Obama will sign the bill when Senate passes it. Akaka/Inouye being advised to hurry up and pass the bill. Inouye and Lingle make compromise -- Akaka bill will be amended to accommodate Lingle's objections, and Lingle will send letter to all Senators announcing her support for it. Ryan William Nohea Garcia, a newly minted lawyer who is ethnic Hawaiian, published a heavily footnoted 78-page article ripping the Akaka bill, in the Asian-Pacific Law & Policy Journal.
Full text of these items above is available at
http://www.angelfire.com/big09a/AkakaHist111May2010.html

=================

INDEX OF History of the Hawaiian Government Reorganization bill from September 1, 2010 through December 31, 2010. Oct 14 Akaka said some people are concerned that we are running out of time to pass the bill in 2010 ... this bill is alive, and we have been working on it every day ... we will be able to schedule a vote and pass the bill this year, before Congress adjourns. Oct 28: Congressman Charles Djou calls for a plebiscite on Akaka bill in response to demands from Hawaii Republicans. But Djou narrowly loses to Democrat, perhaps because Djou refused to satisfy his base and insisted he would support the bill. Politicians and news media lament the likelihood the bill will die again this year. December: Reports from inside the Senate say Inouye is actively working to attach the bill to a must-pass omnibus spending bill connected with continuing resolution to keep the government operating. U.S. Commission on Civil Rights reiterates opposition to the bill. Press release by 4 Senators deploring Inouye stealth maneuver. Joint letter from two Obama cabinet officers (DOJ and DOI) to Senate leaders supporting Akaka bill. In the lame duck session a trillion dollar omnibus spending bill with 6000 earmarks included an earmark calling on the Department of Interior to do a study of how to create a Native Hawaiian Indian tribe, but that earmark died when the spending bill died.
Full text of these items below is available at
http://www.angelfire.com/big09a/AkakaHist111Sept2010.html

September 1, 2010: (1) News that Alaska Senator Lisa Murkowski, a cosponsor of the Akaka bill, has lost the Republican primary election; (2) OHA monthly newspaper article reporting that Department of Hawaiian Homelands is supporting the Akaka bill; (3) Senator Akaka commentary from Honolulu Star-Advertiser of August 9 was reprinted in OHA monthly newspaper; (4) OHA trustee Walter Heen trustee commentary in OHA newsaper entitled ‘Uh-oh. Now we have to govern!’ describes some of the controversial topics that must be sorted out by the Akaka tribe's leadership after the bill has passed; (5) Fox News (national) TV video 3 minutes 23 seconds.

September 11: (1) Announcement of series of 3 public lecture/discussions on the Akaka bill presenting the three main positions: Ken Conklin (opposes on civil rights grounds), OHA representative Esther Kiaaina (supports bill), Kekuni Blaisdell and Dexter Kaiama (oppose the bill as interfering with quest for total independence); (2) Democrat gubernatorial candidates Abercrombie and Hannemann hold public debate/discussion at the Maui Native Hawaiian Chamber of Commerce.

Sept 12: Lecture notes from Conklin's Church of the Crossroads presentation today, opposing Akaka bill -- summarized version published in "Hawaii Political Info"

Sept 20: Alaska Senator Lisa Murkowski, the only Republican cosponsor of the Akaka bill, lost the primary election to Joe Miller, a conservative Republican who is favored to win the Senate seat and who will probably oppose the Akaka bill. Murkowski announced a write-in campaign, which could drain votes from Miller and give the seat to a Democrat. Senate Republican leaders will probably punish Murkowski by stripping her of seniority and committee assignments, which would weaken her ability to make deals to support the Akaka bill.

Sept 28: (1) Townhall.com and also Grassroot Institute of Hawaii publish video of Ken Conklin's 68 minute lecture/discussion on the Akaka bill from Church of the Crossroads from September 12; (2) University of Hawaii Professor Jon VanDyke article in online newspaper, "Why the Akaka Bill Should be Enacted"; (3)Article in "Indian Country Today" describes the upcoming annual Native Hawaiian Convention, saying it comes "comes at a pivotal time in contemporary Hawaiian history as Hawaiians near the point of federal recognition."

October 2: American Bar Association press release includes a letter they have sent to all 100 Senators supporting the Akaka bill. (+ online comment by Ken Conklin + October 9 wisecrack response by newspaper columnist)

October 4-5: Detailed rebuttal by Ken Conklin to a report published by OHA alleging abusive disparate treatment of ethnic Hawaiians by the judiciary and the criminal justice system. The rebuttal includes analysis of the timing of this report just prior to the lame duck session of Congress which will be the last best hope for passing the Akaka bill. The rebuttal also says the timing might be to pressure the Senators and Governor Lingle to abandon the amendment they agreed upon to NOT give immediate sovereignty to ethnic Hawaiians, including jurisdiction over the criminal justice system, until after negotiations have taken place.

October 5: The monthly OHA newspaper was finally posted on the OHA website. It includes an article about how a bill becomes law in Congress, plus answers from candidates on the November ballot regarding their views on the Akaka bill.

October 7: Letter to editor says same-sex marriage and the Akaka bill are both issues of fundamental rights; and if one should not be placed on the ballot then neither should the other.

October 12: (1) Ken Conklin published article urges vote against Charles Djou (R) because Djou supports Akaka bill and would be far more effective in pushing it that Colleen Hanabusa (D); (2) Commentary blasts the American Bar Association for its endorsement of the Akaka bill, noting that the ABA has become a leftist group and is no longer credible in its endorsements; (3) Council for Native Hawaiian Advancement annual convention has many guests from Obama administration promising handouts and support for Akaka bill; (4) and (5) OHA sponsored a televised debate between gubernatorial candidates Aiona(R) and Abercrombie(D) -- 2 TV stations report both candidates supported Akaka bill and numerous government race-based handouts; (6) Online newspaper says during OHA debate Abercrombie said best hope for Akaka bill is to pass it during the lame duck session, but Aiona says pass it next year when he will work with Republicans to get the job done.

October 14: Senator Akaka, speaking to the annual convention of the Council for Native Hawaiian Advancement, says "I know some people are concerned that we are running out of time to pass the [Akaka] bill in 2010. Let me set the record straight before all of you today: this bill is alive, and we have been working on it every day. I am optimistic that, with the strong support we have received, we will be able to schedule a vote and pass the bill this year, before Congress adjourns."

October 23: Honolulu Star-Advertiser editorial endorses all the incumbents for OHA trustee, saying that OHA needs stability and experience to implement the Akaka bill when it passes. Ken Conklin posts online comment opposing the Akaka bill and recommending whom to vote for.

October 25: Jere Hiroshi Krischel explains that when ethnic Hawaiians demand parity with Native American tribes and Native Alaskan tribes, they are actually demanding rights superior to those of Native Americans and Native Alaskans who are not members of any tribe; and setting a precedent for all such indigenous non-tribal people to demand "reorganization" into tribes of their own.

October 28: Hawaii Congressman Charles Djou (R) calls for nonbinding plebiscite on the Akaka bill in response to demands from Hawaii Republican activists.

November 1, 2010: (1) Jere Krischel essay "One Nation, One People, One Law: E pluribus unum."; (2) OHA trustee Boyd Mossman says unless the Akaka bill passes in the lame duck session of Congress, "...the darts of our opposition will pierce and kill any efforts we make to protect and secure our culture and our people for the future. The Legislature won't have to pay us from ceded land revenues, OHA will no longer need to exist. Hawaiian Homes will be opened to all. Equal treatment will trump indigenous recognition. The Akaka bill has one more shot ... a prayer might be helpful."

November 3: Hawaii TV news report: "Election Day outcome bad for Akaka Bill"

Nov 4: Another Hawaii TV news report: "Hawaii's Akaka Bill Appears Dead Now That Republicans Control U.S. House"

Nov 8: Honolulu Star-Advertiser snarky little mini-editorial "Time to say goodbye to Good Ship Akaka Bill?"

Nov. 9: Comcast Cable TV News (New England) reports "A long-sought federal law allowing Native Hawaiians to form their own government stands little chance of passing Congress before the end of the year, and its approval may be even less likely after a Republican House majority takes office in January."

Nov. 10: Fred Rohlfing, a former Hawaii state senator, says the Akaka bill should be decided by Hawaii's people and not by Congress. "That sovereignty could be stolen from the people of Hawaii and given to one racial group by a lame-duck Congress convened some 6,000 miles from Hawaii nei, would be an insult to our democratic right to self government, our ohana and our American heritage."

Nov 13: Letter to editor: Having pushed through the House of Representatives the most radical version of the Akaka bill, and having been elected governor, Abercrombie has now been empowered to be the great white father of the Akakakanaka tribe.

Nov. 15: Honolulu Star-Advertiser editorial moans that it's inexcusable that the Akaka bill has been fiddled with and allowed to languish until there's probably no time left to pass it in a Congress that offered the best chance for passing it in 10 years, with a Democrat President who promised to sign it.

==============

On November 15, 2010 (lame duck session) a new version of the Akaka bill was introduced. Here's the full text of the new version of the Akaka bill, whose bill number is S.3945
http://tinyurl.com/23ov9m2

The newly introduced bill is allegedly the compromise version of the bill which was agreed to by Hawaii Governor Linda Lingle. Great caution must be exercised regarding whether this new bill is truly intended to be passed, or whether it is merely a decoy to draw attention while the more dangerous HR.2314 is actually offered for cloture on the floor or inserted as a rider or by reference in another bill. That sort of stealth decoy maneuver is what actually happened in 2005-2006. See
http://www.angelfire.com/big09a/AkakaManeuversSeptDec2010.html

In September the Church of the Crossroads hosted three consecutive Sundays of lecture/discussions on the Akaka bill, moderated by Dr. Chuck Burrows of the Kailua Hawaiian Civic Club. Those three events were taped by 'Olelo TV and are now being broadcast on Channel 53 (NATV) at various times.

The easiest way to see them all is on Friday November 19, Channel 53, from 12:30 to 4:00 PM. So set your video recorders.

1. Ken Conklin, opposing Akaka bill because of support for unity and equality, 66 minutes. (12:30 to 1:37; then unrelated fillers until 2:00)

2. Esther Kiaaina, supporting the Akaka bill, officially representing OHA. (2:00 to 3:00)

3. Kekuni Blaisdell and Dexter Kaiama, opposing the Akaka bill from the perspective of supporting Hawaiian independence. (3:00 to 4:00)

There are other scattered times for rebroadcasts of the three events on Wednesday and Thursday; and perhaps there will be additional showings after Friday. Check the Olelo TV listings on the 'Olelo website.

=============

Nov. 16: New version of Akaka bill introduced in Senate: S.3945. Is it merely pro-forma, or is it the start of a stealth campaign?

Nov. 17: (1) Letter says failure of Akaka bill shows God has plans to make Hawaii the spiritual and political capitol of the world; (2) Letter says Akaka bill failure repeats the illegal U.S. overthrow of monarchy in 1893; (3) Guest editorial in Hawaii Reporter opposes Akaka bill

Nov 18: (1) Honolulu Advertiser finally reports that new version of the Akaka bill has been introduced, but news report fails to provide text of the bill or details about its new provisions.; (2) Article in Hawaii Reporter discusses the issue of legal immunity for the Akaka tribe, citing an example of a non-Indian couple injured by a car driven by a member of a federally recognized tribe using a tribal car outside the reservation -- the non-Indian couple was unable to get money to cover their damages, on account of tribal sovereign immunity.

November 19: Letter to editor wonders when people will "realize we are not a tribe of Indians that their ancestors killed to make America? Kanaka maoli are people of a living Hawaii kingdom nation."

Nov 21: Honolulu Star-Advertiser columnist Richard Borreca offers a conspiracy theory about how the Akaka bill might still be enacted during the lame duck session.

Nov 23: Indian Country Today brief news report takes note of the introduction of the new version of the Akaka bill in the Senate.

December 1, 2010: "Akaka bill now being attached to "must-pass" legislation despite Akaka and Inouye previously deploring such a maneuver."

December 2, 2010: (1) PRESS RELEASE FROM SENATORS KYL, ALEXANDER, CORNYN, COBURN DEPLORING INOUYE STEALTH MANEUVER ON AKAKA ; (2) Roger Clegg in National Review Online describes Inouye's planned "sneak attack" and describes Akaka bill as "infamous"; (3) Inouye quoted as saying "We’ve been working on this for over a decade now. No one can say that we’ve been hiding this." but Steven Duffield describes why the process is outrageous; (4) Honolulu Star-Advertiser publishes 2 side-by-side commentaries about the alleged death of Akaka bill, thus totally ignoring the growing controversy over Inouye stealth maneuver to pass it: (4a) Walter Heen, retired judge and outgoing OHA trustee: "Lamenting Akaka Bill. Hawaiians themselves are partly to blame for the bill's failure, but the real culprit is a GOP-led anti-indigenous philosophy; (4b) John Carroll, retired legislator and recent candidate for Governor in Republican primary: "The idea of a race-based sovereign nation within the bounds of a U.S. state should never have been taken seriously"

December 3: (1) Inouye Not Planning to ‘Jam Through’ Akaka Bill Via an Appropriations Measure, Spokesperson Says; (2) National Review online: "The Discriminatory Akaka Bill: ‘Infamous’ Indeed"

Dec 4: Andrew Walden reviews what happened with the Akaka bil during the past year, and weaves a story about "How Inouye sabotaged Akaka Bill"

Dec 6: Brian Darling, director of U.S. Senate Relations for the Heritage Foundation, warns "Rumors are swirling inside the beltway that Sen. Daniel Inouye (D-Hawaii) is trying to sneak through Congress the Native Hawaiian Bill, also known as the Akaka Bill."

Dec. 7: (1) U.S. COMMISSION ON CIVIL RIGHTS WARNS SENATE ABOUT INOUYE'S ATTEMPT TO ATTACH AKAKA BILL TO APPROPRIATIONS BILL, AND USCCR REASSERTS ITS PREVIOUSLY STATED OPPOSITION TO THE AKAKA BILL; (2) Hawaiian independence activist warns about the Akaka bill: "A nation within a nation is nothing more than accepting to be second-class citizens."

Dec 9: A letter supporting the Akaka bill version newly introduced on November 15, S.3945, was signed by Attorney General Eric Holder and Secretary of Interior Ken Salazar, and was sent to Senate leaders.

Dec 10: News report about Holder/Salazar letter quotes Senators Akaka and Inouye as being very pleased with it, and hoping they can push the bill through Congress in the days remaining before adjournment.

Dec 11: (1) Honolulu Star-Advertiser reports the letter from Obama cabinet officers (DOJ Holder and DOI Salazar) supporting Akaka bill, but reiterates the propaganda that there's probably not enough time to pass the bill; (2) Maui News briefly reports the Holder/Salazar letter and the letter from Senators opposing Inouye stealth maneuver.

Dec 14: (1) Proposed Senate Omnibus Bill includes funding for study on Akaka Bill, to "make recommendations to Congress no later than September 30, 2011, on developing a mechanism for the reorganization of a Native Hawaiian governing entity and recognition by the United States of the Native Hawaian governing entity as an Indian tribe within the meaning of Articles I and II of the Constitution."; (2) Honolulu Star-Advertiser "breaking news" at 11:09 PM briefly reports the Inouye earmark , but no news reported in the physical newspaper the following day; (3) Statement by Senator Inouye takes note of the joint letter supporting the Akaka bill from Attorney General Eric Holder and Secretary of Interior Ken Salazar; (4) Commentary complains about how bad the Akaka bill is; (5) Commentary ridicules the Obama administration and Hawaii's Senators for trying to revive this dead horse in a dead duck Congress.

Dec 15: National Review Online editorial calls the omnibus spending bill "one last disgrace" by Democrats and "the legislative equivalent of a middle finger" because of thousands of earmarks it contains including a study to support the Akaka bill, "an odious piece of segregationist legislation that would establish a race-based government on the Hawaiian archipelago.

Dec 16: Radio New Zealand International describes the proposed study in support of the Akaka bill as though it has already now been enacted, "so that if the Native Hawaiian Reorganisation passes in the future the state of Hawaii can hit the ground running in beginning that process."

Dec 20: Ilya Shapiro, writing in the Cato Institute blog, celebrates the fact that the Akaka bill was killed when the bloated omnibus spending bill was killed (the Akaka bill itself was not a part of the spending bill, but there was an earmark in the spending bill calling for the Department of Interior to work with Hawaii's race-based institutions to do a "study" of how to get federal recognition for a Native Hawaiian Indian tribe; and that earmark died when the spending bill died).

December 22, 2010 (1) Senator Akaka's statement on the Senate floor eulogizing the now-dead Akaka bill, rebutting some arguments against it, and promising to push it again next year; (2) Associated Press short summary of Akaka's speech; (3) Honolulu Star-Advertiser reports new leadership at Office of Hawaiian Affairs will continue the same policies, will be more aggressively active, and will continue seeking passage of Akaka bill; (4) Honolulu Star-Advertiser Associated Press writer reports that OHA plans "to start forming their own new but unrecognized government following the failure of federal legislation to do so. ... Formation of the new Hawaiian government involves signing people up for it, electing delegates and creating founding documents ... You'll still need the federal bill at some point, ... But when you go before Congress, you will already have a government in place, and you will then ask the Congress to recognize that government. That's the idea."; (5) The Role of Alaska Native Corporations in Pushing the Akaka bill (followup to published investigative report on federal contracting preferences for ethnic Hawaiians. Followup reviews the period from 2000 - 2005 when the Akaka bill and the Council for Native Hawaiian Advancement were both getting started)

December 23: President Obama arrives in Hawaii for vacation, accompanied on Air Force One by Senator Akaka and Congresswoman Hirono (photo of all three walking together down the steps from the plane). Article reports the President did not discuss the Akaka bill with them, but "Akaka, who made a statement in Washington that he will continue fighting for the Akaka Bill next year, said the president continues to support it."

Christmas Day, December 25: Honolulu Star-Advertiser says "Opponents of the Akaka Bill were happy the measure died when the Senate adjourned this week, but supporters remain hopeful Congress will eventually pass a measure that grants federal recognition for native Hawaiians." Supporters and opponents are quoted.

December 26: Letter to editor takes note of AP article of December 22 which reported that OHA plans to move forward with creating an ethnic Hawaiian "nation" despite failure of the Akaka bill -- letter writer says it's not clear whether most ethnic Hawaiians want to do that, and in any case such a process should not be done by a state government agency or paid for with taxpayer dollars.

December 28: News release from "Hawaiian Kingdom" "celebrates the demise of the infamous "Akaka Bill" in the U.S. Congress."

December 29: Honolulu Star-Advertiser columnist Dave Shapiro says stalling and secrecy caused the Akaka bill to fail. He says Akaka should abandon nationhood elements of the bill and instead try to get federal recognition of indigenous status to protect against lawsuits.

December 31, 2010
(1) Honolulu Advertiser reports results of online poll from December 30: "Now that the Akaka Bill appears to be dead, do you think efforts should continue to extend federal recognition of some sort to native Hawaiians?" Yes 39%, No 61%;
(2) OHA chair Haunani Apoliona giving up chair position delivers her final "State of OHA" speech and describes the events of November and December leading to Akaka bill fizzle and says "if Native Hawaiians are committed to self-determination, this additional hurdle should not derail our efforts or our resolve. ... The time is now for us, individually, to decide to participate or not participate in this Native Hawaiian Governance Reorganization Process. Our commitment to participate is affirmed by our ENROLLMENT" ;
(3) OHA trustee Rowena Akana monthly commentary says the Akaka bill is not dead because Obama is President and favors it, and Governor Abercrombie is buddies with House Speaker Boehner, and the Akaka bill "doesn’t have anything to do with being a Democrat or a Republican and should not be such a politically divisive issue." But then she shows her nasty divisiveness by making vicious personal attacks against Akaka bill opponent Jere Krischel and the Grassroot Institute.
(4) Republican Congressman Charles Djou was defeated for re-election, and today was his last day in office. He held a farewell news conference and said "he got a lot of commitments from Republican colleagues to support the Akaka bill..." Ken Conklin wrote an online comment taking credit for having "outed" Djou as a supporter of the Akaka bill; and Conklin hopes that the outing caused Djou to lose support from his Republican base and will serve as a warning to future Republican candidates that they must oppose the bill.

END OF INDEX OF History of the Hawaiian Government Reorganization bill from September 1, 2010 through December 31, 2010. Oct 14 Akaka said some people are concerned that we are running out of time to pass the bill in 2010 ... this bill is alive, and we have been working on it every day ... we will be able to schedule a vote and pass the bill this year, before Congress adjourns. Oct 28: Congressman Charles Djou calls for a plebiscite on Akaka bill in response to demands from Hawaii Republicans. But Djou narrowly loses to Democrat, perhaps because Djou refused to satisfy his base and insisted he would support the bill. Politicians and news media lament the likelihood the bill will die again this year. December: Reports from inside the Senate say Inouye is actively working to attach the bill to a must-pass omnibus spending bill connected with continuing resolution to keep the government operating. U.S. Commission on Civil Rights reiterates opposition to the bill. Press release by 4 Senators deploring Inouye stealth maneuver. Joint letter from two Obama cabinet officers (DOJ and DOI) to Senate leaders supporting Akaka bill. In the lame duck session a trillion dollar omnibus spending bill with 6000 earmarks included an earmark calling on the Department of Interior to do a study of how to create a Native Hawaiian Indian tribe, but that earmark died when the spending bill died.
Full text of these items above is available at
http://www.angelfire.com/big09a/AkakaHist111Sept2010.html


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