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History of the Hawaiian Government Reorganization bill in the 113th Congress (January 2013 through December 2014), including efforts to create a state-recognized tribe and assemble a racial registry for a membership roll, or get federal recognition through administrative rule changes.


(c) Copyright 2013 - 2014 Kenneth R. Conklin, Ph.D. All rights reserved

On this page is the history of the Hawaiian Government Reorganization bill (formerly known as the Hawaiian Recognition bill; always known informally as the Akaka bill) during the 113th Congress (January 1, 2013 to December 31, 2014).

The history includes a collection of all significant news reports, editorials, commentaries, letters to editor, cartoons, excerpts from the Congressional Record, etc.

The index for the entire 2 years of the 113th Congress is shown below, in chronological order, subdivided into several time periods as events unfold. Full text of each news report, commentary, etc. is provided on the appropriate subpage.

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QUICK REVIEW, AND LINKS, FOR THE HISTORY FROM 2000 THROUGH 2010

For a thorough history of the Native Hawaiian Recognition bill from its birth in February 2000 through 2002 and beyond, focusing on the pattern of stealth and deception in creating the bill and trying to pass it, see:
http://www.angelfire.com/hi2/hawaiiansovereignty/Akakahistory.html

For the complete history of the Akaka bill in the 108th Congress alone (2003-2004), including all versions of the bill's text, and news coverage of political activity related to it (a total of perhaps 200 pages plus links to additional subpages), see:
http://www.angelfire.com/hi2/hawaiiansovereignty/AkakaHist108thCong.html

For a short history focusing on the stealth tactics during the 108th Congress, see:
http://www.angelfire.com/hi2/hawaiiansovereignty/AkakaStealth20032004.html

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The history for the 109th Congress included pleasant surprises in the House of Representatives. The bill stayed bottled up in the committee which had jurisdiction (Resources) and never even came to a vote in that committee. However, the Judiciary Committee took notice that the bill was threatening to come to the floor in the Senate, and did not want to see a repeat of House stealth maneuvers from previous years. Therefore the House Judiciary Subcommittee on the Constitution held a hearing where opponents of the bill were actually allowed to testify along with supporters of the bill -- the first time any opponents have ever been allowed to testify in any hearing in Washington in either the House or the Senate. As a result of that hearing a group of 21 House members wrote a letter to Speaker Hastert demanding that the bill be killed. (even though it had never yet had a hearing in the Resources committee).

The history for the 109th Congress (2005-2006) was tumultuous in the Senate and in the media. Several Senators blocked the bill by placing holds on it. An attempt to bring the bill to the Senate floor in summer 2005 was blocked by God (Hurricane Katrina). In June 2006 there were more than 4 hours of debate on the Senate floor during a two day period leading up to a recorded vote on a cloture motion (a motion to overcome holds on the bill, cut off debate, and bring the bill to a vote). A cloture motion requires 60 votes. There were only 56 votes in favor, including several Republicans who strongly oppose the bill but had made an agreement in late 2004 to support cloture (although they would then be free to vote against the bill itself, and in fact had publicly announced their opposition). Following the failure of cloture in June 2006, the bill remained dormant through the end of the year. Dozens of nationally-known political commentators wrote articles strongly opposing the bill, and major newspapers published editorials and news reports (including a New York Times editorial in favor of the bill). Website coverage for the 109th Congress includes over 2,000 pages of news reports, commentaries, transcripts of the Senate floor debate from the Congressional Record, etc. An 80-page index lists all items in chronological order and provides links to webpages which provide full text of all items for each segment of time. See:
http://www.angelfire.com/hi2/hawaiiansovereignty/AkakaHist109thCong.html

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The 110th Congress ran from January 1, 2007 through December 31, 2008 under Democrat control. The U.S. House Committee on Resources passed Akaka bill unamended May 2, 2007. The U.S. Senate Indian Affairs Committee held a hearing on the Akaka bill May 3, 2007 and passed it unamended on May 10, 2007. In October 2007 the Akaka bill was scheduled for floor action in the House. On October 22, 2007 President Bush issued a strongly worded statement opposing the Akaka bill and pledging he would veto it if it reached his desk. Nevertheless, the House held a floor debate on the bill on October 24, and passed the bill by a vote of 261-153 after a failed attempt to amend it and/or send it back to the Resources committee. Every Democrat voted in favor. Transcript of the floor debate, and record of the YEAs and NAYs, is provided. In Honolulu, the Hawaii Advisory Committee to the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights held extensive hearings with testimony on several islands, in the face of a strong and vitriolic propaganda campaign in the media against the committee taking up the issue (the committee in previous years had been stacked in favor of Hawaiian sovereignty, but its membership now was more evenly divided and there were fears it might oppose the bill). On November 15, 2007 the committee voted 8-6 not to make any recommendation to the national commission. Throughout 2008 there were many news reports, letters, and commentary on all sides of the issue, but no further action. The Senate Democrat leadership never tried to bring the bill to the floor because the Republicans made it clear they would filibuster. During the last half of 2008 economic issues, and the election, took priority, and the bill died without ever being brought to the Senate floor. A lengthy index of all significant news reports, letters, cartoons, and commentaries provides links to the full text of every indexed item, broken into several time periods. The index is at:
http://www.angelfire.com/planet/bigfiles40/AkakaHist110thCong.html

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The 111th Congress ran from January 1, 2009 through December 31, 2010 under Democrat control. The Democrats had a huge majority in the House, and for most of the two years the Democrats also had a filibuster-proof supermajority in the Senate; and a President who had promised to sign the bill when it passed. Nevertheless, civil rights activists in Hawaii and Republicans in the Senate, stopped the bill. A major factor in the death of the Akaka bill was a combination of overreaching by Hawaiian zealots who insisted on trying to ram through the most dangerous version of the bill ever, and incompetence by Senators Inouye and Akaka who tried sneaky maneuvers behind the scenes and then failed to act promptly to enact a so-called compromise version.

During the two year period there were five major different versions of the Akaka bill. Versions 1,2,3 had been previously introduced in Congress during various years from 2000 to 2008. Version #4 was the most dangerous, and was introduced in the House committee barely days before the committee hearing, and drew strong objections from Hawaii's Governor and Attorney General. The committee forced Rep. Abercrombie to withdraw version #4 and passed version #3 on which it had held a hearing with public testimony. But Congressman Abercrombie later went to the House floor, substituted version #4 in place of #3, and was successful in ramming #4 through to passage on the House floor. Version #5 was a compromise with Governor Lingle in an attempt to get some Republican votes in the Senate, but version #5 was not formally introduced until mid-November 2010 and died in the lame duck session a couple days before Christmas without without any committee hearing or floor action.

Here are more details. Three matched pairs (companion bills with identical content) of the Akaka bill were introduced in early 2009. Their dates of introduction and bill numbers are: February 4, 2009, S.381 and H.R.862; March 25, 2009: S.708 and H.R.1711; May 7, 2009: S.1011 and H.R.2314. Hearing on H.R.2314 on June 11, 2009 (Kamehameha Day) before U.S. House Committee on Natural Resources (video and transcripts available). Markup set for July 9 was postponed at last minute because Republican minority ranking member Doc Hastings demanded to know Dept. of Justice and Obama administration's views on the bill, and perhaps because of OHA and Native Hawaiian Bar Association objections to restrictions on the powers of the Akaka tribe. Hearing on S.1011 on August 6 in U.S. Senate Committee on Indian Affairs; Webcast, written statements by invited witnesses, and news reports, are provided. U.S. Commission on Civil Rights letter to Congressional leaders once again blasts Akaka bill. Zogby poll results released Dec. 15 show strong opposition to bill. Major amendments planned to be rammed through House and Senate committee markups Dec 16 and 17 were strongly opposed by Hawaii Governor and Attorney General. House committee passes unamended (original) H.R.2314 Dec. 16. Senate committee passes heavily amended more dangerous version Dec. 17. Jan 28, 2010 OHA and Hawaii Attorney General propose amendments to the Senate amended bill. At least one Republican Senator placed a hold on the bill. Feb. 23 2010 Akaka bill most dangerous version #4 was substituted on the House floor to become HR2314, and passed the House that same day by vote of 245-164. March 23 Governor Lingle letter to all 100 Senators opposes current version of the bill; Huge White House briefing in June for Akaka bill lobbyists confirms Obama will sign the bill when Senate passes it. Compromise reached to amend bill so Lingle will support it. Compromise bill formally introduced November 15, but might be only a decoy. 4 Senators publicly deplore Inouye stealth maneuver to attach Akaka bill to must-pass omnibus spending bill as part of continuing resolution to keep government running. In the lame duck session, December 2010, the Akaka bill itself was never considered by the Senate and never included inside any other bill. But a trillion dollar omnibus spending bill containing 6000 earmarks included an earmark calling on the Department of Interior to do a study of how to create a Native Hawaiian Indian tribe. That spending bill was withdrawn from the Senate by Majority Leader Harry Reid when he figured out there were not enough votes to pass it, and so the Akaka bill died.

The index for the 111th Congress, summarized in the above three paragraphs, is at
http://www.angelfire.com/big09a/AkakaHist111thCong.html

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The 112th Congress (January 2011 to December 2012) was controlled by Democrats in the Senate and by Republicans in the House. The Akaka bill was introduced in the House Committee on Natural Resources, but died in committee without even a hearing. In the Senate the first version introduced in the Indian Affairs Committee was passed by the committee but went nowhere, although Senator Inouye made two stealth maneuvers in October 2011 and September 2012, inserting a short paragraph deep inside the Dept of Interior appropriations bill to place the State of Hawaii Act 195 tribe on the list of federally recognized tribes; but Republicans blocked it. A second version of the Akaka bill that was extraordinarily powerful and dangerous passed the Committee on Indian Affairs in one minute on September 13, 2012. On December 17 Senator Inouye died following several days of hospitalization under intensive care for respiratory problems; and on that same day Senator Akaka had a favorable committee report sent to the Senate for the substitute new version of the bill and it was placed on the Senate calendar under general orders. On December 20 Senator Akaka (retiring in a few more days) made his farewell speech and asked his colleagues to pass the Akaka bill in honor of Senator Inouye. There was no further action, and the 112th Congress came to an end on New Years Day with rushed passage of the "fiscal cliff" bill. For the chronological index to published news reports and commentaries for 2011-2012, with links to subpages containing full text of all items, see
http://www.angelfire.com/big09/AkakaHist112thCong.html


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NOW BEGINS THE HISTORY OF THE AKAKA BILL IN THE 113TH CONGRESS, JANUARY 2013 THROUGH DECEMBER 2014.

THIS IS AN INDEX OF ALL SIGNIFICANT NEWS REPORTS AND COMMENTARIES DURING THE 113TH CONGRESS, IN CHRONOLOGICAL ORDER, DIVIDED INTO SEGMENTS OF TIME. FULL TEXT OF EACH ITEM IS PROVIDED IN THE SUBPAGE RELATED TO THAT SEGMENT.

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INDEX OF NEWS REPORTS AND COMMENTARIES FROM JANUARY 1, 2013 THROUGH MAY 31, 2013. Hawaii Sens & Reps confirm their zealotry. OHA resolution in state legislature commemorates 20th anniversary of apology resolution and Conklin submits satirical counter-resolution calling for its repeal; OHA lobbyist in Washington lists priorities as Akaka bill and protection of Hawaiian racial entitlements. Bill passes state legislature allowing all 108,000 signatures on defunct Kau Inoa racial registry during more than 7 years to be added to the 9300 gathered after a full year for the new Kana'iolowalu racial registry without permission from signers.
For full text of each item below go to
http://www.angelfire.com/big09/AkakaHistStartJan012013.html

January 6, 2012: The Sunday Honolulu Star-Advertiser published half-page statements written by each of Hawaii's two U.S. Senators and two U.S. House representatives, in which they described their intentions for the 113th Congress and their committee assignments. Senator Schatz and Representative Hanabusa devoted parts of their statements to their intentions regarding the Akaka bill -- the relevant excerpts are provided. Senator Hirono and Representative Gabbard did not mention the Akaka bill, but their support for it is clear from past performance and campaign pledges.

Jan 9: "Hirono, Schatz renew quest for Native Hawaiian measure" Honolulu newspaper reports the Hawaii Congressional delegation will be meeting with the ethnic Hawaiian establishment to get their marching orders.

Jan 10: Hawaii Free Press provides a YouTube video and transcript of Ben Cayetano (Governor, 1994-2002) speaking on January 9 to a Honolulu business luncheon, expressing his opposition to the Akaka bill. See also his 2002 Statehood Day proclamation endorsing unity and equality.

Jan 21: An event was held on the grounds of Iolani Palace yesterday to commemorate the 120th anniversary of the Hawaiian revolution that overthrew the monarchy on January 17, 1893. The event featured ex-Governor John Waihe'e and was sponsored by the Kana'iolowalu racial registry, which got some people to sign up.

Jan 22: 3 articles describe the roles Hawaii's Senators and Congresswomen will play in the Democrat Party and in committees related to the Akaka bill. Freshman Congresswoman Tulsi Gabbard will be a Vice-Chair of the national Democrat Party; Colleen Hanabusa will be ranking member (top Democrat) on the House subcommittee which has authority over the Akaka bill; Senator Brian Schatz will be on the Indian Affairs Committee.

February 1, 2013: OHA monthly newspaper publishes interview with Kawika Riley, OHA's chief lobbyist in Washington regarding the Akaka bill and other priorities.

February 11: OHA introduced a resolution in the state legislature to commemorate the 20th anniversary of the U.S. apology resolution; Ken Conklin testimony offers a satirical legislative resolution calling for repeal of the U.S. apology resolution because it is filled with historical falsehoods and has been used to justify racial entitlement programs and the Akaka bill.

February 12: OHA's chief lobbyist in Washington, Kawika Riley, says Congress has a federal trust obligation to Native Hawaiians and should not cut the budget by abandoning Native Hawaiian racial entitlements in healthcare and education.

March 4, 2013: Hawaii's two Senators and two Representatives meet with each other in Washington to discuss their plans for legislation.

March 7: Congress passed a revised and reauthorized version of the Violence Against Women Act, to protect Indian women living on reservations. This new version is controversial because it gives Indian tribes jurisdiction over non-Indians accused of violent crimes against women on Indian reservations. Doc Hastings, Chairman of the House Natural Resources Committee which would have jurisdiction over the Akaka bill in the 113th Congress, published some comments about VAWA.

March 13: OHA presents written testimony on a resolution in the state legislature that would put the state on record as recognizing the continuing existence of an independent nation of Hawaii whose descendants are lawfully living in Hawaii. OHA says it supports the right of ethnic Hawaiians to choose for themselves whether to have a state-recognized tribe (Act 195), a federally recognized tribe (Akaka bill), or an internationally recognized nation.

March 18: Colleen Hanabusa (D, HI), only in her second term in Congress, has been chosen as ranking member (head of the Democrats) on the House Subcommittee on Indian and Alaska Native Affairs. In an interview with Indian Country Today, she demonstrated some misperceptions or ignorance about Carcieri, and the Indian Reorganization Act; and she reaffirms her intention to push for the Akaka bill [but has not yet introduced it in the 113th Congress].

March 19: The House Subcommittee on Indian and Alaska Native Affairs held an oversight hearing on "Authorization, standards, and procedures for whether, how, and when Indian tribes should be newly recognized by the federal government: Perspective of the Department of the Interior." The hearing comes at a time when there are rumors of a backroom deal whereby President Obama might issue an executive order to give federal recognition to the Akaka tribe. Kevin K. Washburn, Assistant Secretary of Indian Affairs, U.S. Department of the Interior gave written testimony which includes a list of the 7 mandatory criteria for recognition. He said that since the process was established in 1978 the Department has federally recognized 17 Indian tribes and denied 34 groups. Since 2009 there has been one final determination granting recognition and six final determinations denying recognition.

April 2, 2013: According to the OHA monthly newspaper for April, Former U.S. Sen. Daniel Akaka is confident Native Hawaiians will receive the federal recognition they deserve and views the Kana'iolowalu registration campaign as a necessary step. However, the racial registry has gotten only 9300 signups since July 2012, far short of the campaign's yearlong goal of 200,000; and they have extended the signup period to January 19, 2014 in hopes of meeting their goal.

April 11: Keli'i Akina, Ph.D., newly inaugurated President of the Grassroot Institute of Hawaii, publishes article entitled "Hawaiians Give Vote of No Confidence to Sovereign Hawaiian Nation." After nearly a year, the Native Roll Commission has signed up only 9300 ethnic Hawaiians for the racial registry Kana'iolowalu, out of the 527,000 ethnic Hawaiians identified in Census 2010.

April 24: At a hearing in the Senate Indian Affairs Committee, Hawaii Senator Brian Schatz thanked Kevin Washburn, Assistant Secretary for Indian Affairs at the Department of the Interior, for supporting retired Sen. Daniel Akaka's bill that achieves parity for Native Hawaiians.

April 29: OHA, Kamehameha Schools, Department of Hawaiian Homelands, and other race-based programs are spending far less money lobbying in Washington than in recent years, partly because of Congressional gridlock and partly because they are using Hawaii government employees and Hawaiian students in Washington-area colleges to do the lobbying at low cost and in ways that are less visible to public scrutiny.

May 12: A bill that passed the Hawaii legislature and awaits the Governor's signature would allow the Kana'iolowalu racial registry to add the 108,000 signatures from the defunct Kau Inoa registry onto the extremely low number 9300 signatures on the new registry.

END OF INDEX OF NEWS REPORTS AND COMMENTARIES FROM JANUARY 1, 2013 THROUGH MAY 31, 2013. Hawaii Sens & Reps confirm their zealotry. OHA resolution in state legislature commemorates 20th anniversary of apology resolution and Conklin submits satirical counter-resolution calling for its repeal; OHA lobbyist in Washington lists priorities as Akaka bill and protection of Hawaiian racial entitlements. Bill passes state legislature allowing all 108,000 signatures on defunct Kau Inoa racial registry during more than 7 years to be added to the 9300 gathered after a full year for the new Kana'iolowalu racial registry without permission from signers.
For full text of each item above go to
http://www.angelfire.com/big09/AkakaHistStartJan012013.html


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INDEX OF NEWS REPORTS AND COMMENTARIES FROM JUNE 1, 2013 to December 31, 2013. History of the Hawaiian Government Reorganization bill in the 113th Congress from June 1, 2013 and continuing. Hawaii and Alaska delegations meet to solidify support for Akaka bill. Keli'i Akina, President of Grassroot Institute, gives major speech opposing Akaka bill and racial registry and affirming patriotism to America. June 11 (Kamehameha Day holiday in Hawaii) U.S. Senator Schatz gives speech on Senate floor calling for federal recognition of Akaka tribe [no bill introduced yet, but rumors of activity in executive branch], and is supported by Senators Cantwell, Begich, Murkowski, and Franken -- all 5 are members of the Indian Affairs committee. Point by point rebuttal by Conklin. New state law effective July 1 allows the Kanaiolowalu racial registry to automatically add all the names of all the people whose native ancestry has previously been verified by other institutions. Published news reports about, and editorials favoring, efforts to get federal recognition for Akaka tribe through changes in bureaucratic procedures under 25CFR83 or Presidential executive order. 4 of 8 Commissioners of U.S. Commission on Civil Rights then wrote letter to President Obama opposing concept of the Akaka tribe and abuse of executive authority. OHA trustee Oswald Stender says $10 Million already spent [during 9 years] to recruit 120,000 signups for racial registry (out of 529,000 possible) and no more money should be spent. OHA trustees make final payment to close the racial registry and certify a membership roll. Only 30,000 people signed up, while 71,000 had their names automatically transferred by bureaucrats from earlier racial registries.
For full text of each item below go to
http://www.angelfire.com/big09/AkakaHistStartJune012013.html

June 1, 2013: The OHA monthly newspaper reports that OHA sponsored a summit meeting among independence activists, supporters of the federal recognition, and organizers of the Kana'iolowalu racial registry, at University of Hawaii, to share ideas about how to move forward.

June 2: The Conservative Forum for Hawaii held a public discussion about the Akaka bill and the Hawaii Act 195 (2011) racial registry, at the Naniloa Hotel in Hilo. Grassroot Institute president emeritus Dick Rowland, and current president Keli'i Akina, were the speakers. (news report June 4; hour-long video available)

June 4: A consortium of Native Alaskan tribes, Native American tribes, and ethnic Hawaiians seeking federal recognition held a meeting with lawmakers in Washington DC. to discuss how to cooperate in getting recognition for the Akaka tribe and how to ensure continued government funding for existing and future race-based programs. (news report June 6)

June 11, 2013 is Kamehameha Day, a holiday in the State of Hawaii. (1)Senator Brian Schatz (D,HI) gives his maiden speech on Senate floor calling for federal recognition of Akaka tribe (although no bill has yet been introduced); (2) Schatz press release includes supportive comments from Senators Maria Cantwell (D,WA and chair of Indian Affairs Committee), Mark Begich (D,AK), Lisa Murkowski (R,AK), and Al Franken (D,MN) -- all 5 are members of the Indian Affairs committee.; (3) Hawaii TV news report about the speech includes video

June 12: Indian Country Today publishes photos and story about the celebration of Kamehameha Day, including secessionist sentiments.

June 13: Online newspaper publishes a condensed version of a webpage by Ken Conklin containing detailed rebuttals to 23 points in Senator Schatz' speech. The full webpage rebuttal is at
http://tinyurl.com/m3azruz

July 1: OHA monthly newspaper notifies ethnic Hawaiians that a new Hawaii law takes effect today automatically adding all the (108,000) names from the defunct Kau Inoa racial registry (over 7 years and millions of dollars) to the new Kana'iolowalu racial registry (languishing at only 9300 names after its first year).

July 4: Hawaiian independence activist Lela Hubbard urges ethnic Hawaiians NOT to put their names on the racial registry Kana'iolowalu. She says recent legislation forces "Hawaiians who have registered in any Office of Hawaiian Affairs registry, Kamehameha Schools database, Kau Inoa, etc. are now forced members of Kanaiolowalu, the Native Hawaiian roll" violating their right to freedom of association.

July 6: Numerous newspapers report that a new state law allows the ethnic Hawaiian racial registry Kana'iolowalu to automatically include all the names of all the people whose Hawaiian native ancestry has been verified by other institutions including DHHL, Kamehameha Schools, OHA, the state Department of Health, Kau Inoa, etc.

July 15: "The Trouble with the Kana'iolowalu Racial Registry" published essay by Ken Conklin

July 18: PBS-Hawaii live broadcast of a 60 minute panel discussion about ethnic Hawaiian self-governance, focusing on the Kana'iolowalu racial registry. All four panelists are sovereignty activists. The video recording was then placed on YouTube.

July 23: Hawaii's congressional delegation met with President Obama today at the White House. They're representing the Congressional Asian Pacific American Caucus. Some of the issues they'll be discussing reportedly include federal recognition for Native Hawaiians and immigration.

July 29: Andrew Walden essay "Hanabusa: Obama Considers Creating Akaka Tribe Without Congressional Approval" Includes link to download 23-page Dept. of Interior proposed revisions to 25 CFR 83

August 1, 2013: The OHA monthly newspaper for August is pushing hard for the Kana'iolowalu racial registry, including scare tactics. "Public Notice to Native Hawaiians" warns them that if they fail to register for Kana'iolowalu, they might forfeit forever, for themselves and for their descendants, their right to participate in the tribe and to receive benefits.

Aug 6: Ken Conklin essay about various methods whereby the Akaka tribe might get federal recognition, and the kinds of jurisdictional conflicts federal recognition would cause in Hawaii as shown by actual conflicts on the mainland.

Aug 7: Popular leftwing blogger Ian Lind publishes essay in Honolulu Civil Beat online newspaper describing the Kana'iolowalu signup requirements and how there may be hidden agendas in them; concludes he can't decide whether to sign up because the process and consequences are not transparent.

Aug 12: Honolulu Star-Advertiser reports that "Hawaii's congressional delegation has asked President Obama to consider executive action"

Aug 13: Honolulu Star-Advertiser EDITORIAL says Obama can and should act to give federal recognition to Akaka tribe.

Aug 14: (1) Honolulu Star-Advertiser online reader poll "Should President Obama use his executive authority to achieve federal recognition for Native Hawaiian sovereignty?" 3,014 votes, 70% NO.; (2) Andrew Walden analyzes Star-Advertiser editorial from August 13 and cites proof that Obama cannot use the 1994 Federally Recognized Indian Tribe List Act to recognize a native Hawaiian tribe, contrary to what the editorial had said.

Aug 18: Honolulu Star-Advertiser lengthy "news report" describes the low signup for the Kana'iolowalu racial registry, the upcoming grab of all names from previous racial registries; and provides a link to fill out the signup form online.

Aug 20: Ian Lind's blog provides 2 emails from lawyers. One says all racial entitlement programs are likely to be ruled unconstitutional unless ethnic Hawaiians become a federally recognized tribe either through an act of Congress or through administrative process. Other says ethnic Hawaiians greedily pushing for complete takeover are likely to get defeated, and points out that the assertion of unrelinquished sovereignty of native Hawaiians is false because sovereignty in 1892 belonged to a citizenry and government that were multiracial.

Aug 21: ANOTHER Star-Advertiser editorial pushing the Kana'iolowalu racial registry. This one laments the slow pace of signups, and warns that the ultimate goal remains unclear and disputed.

Aug 22: Washington Times reports "Obama urged to use executive order to recognize Native Hawaiians"

Aug 29: "I have a dream" -- for Hawaii, 50 years later (Recalling Martin Luther King's speech, and how his dream applies to Hawaii in 2013). Ken Conklin provides a one-paragraph list of things Hawaii must do to implement King's dream of racial equality and justice, along with detailed footnotes explaining each component of the dream. Major components include abandoning efforts to create an Akaka tribe, and eliminating racial entitlement programs.

Aug 30: The new Secretary of the U.S. Department of Interior will be the keynote speaker at the Native Hawaiian Convention in Honolulu, signaling closer cooperation in working toward federal recognition of an Akaka tribe.

September 4, 2013: (1) Washington Times news report about Hawaiian independence acttivists opposing the effort to get the Obama administration to grant federal recognition to the Akaka tribe. They have a petition on the White House website; (2) Hawaiian sovereignty activist Trisha Kehaulani Watson created a new blog and posted her first essay on it, opposing the Kana'iolowalu racial registry and especially opposing the automatic transfer of names from other racial registries without asking registrants' permission.

Sept 5: (1) Honolulu Star-Advertiser news report that Sally Jewell, the new Secretary of Interior, gave a speech at the annual convention of the Council for Native Hawaiian Advancement. She said Obama supports federal recognition of the Akaka tribe, but it's unclear how to accomplish that through administrative processes. (2) Honolulu Civil Beat online newspaper has a very different report about Jewell's speech, including details about protocols used in greeting her.

Sept 6: Honolulu Star-Advertiser mini-editorial notes that Jewell's speech sent mixed messages about administrative recognition of Akaka tribe, and federal oversight of the Department of Hawaiian Homelands.

Sept 6: Honolulu Star-Advertiser mini-editorial notes that Jewell's speech sent mixed messages about administrative recognition of Akaka tribe, and federal oversight of the Department of Hawaiian Homelands.

Sept 14: The annual convention of the National Federation of Republican Assemblies meeting in Dallas adopted a resolution opposing "the enactment of any provisions of the Akaka Bill to include the establishment of a native Hawaiians-only government, program, department or agency as well as the division of the people of Hawaii by race or ethnicity through congressional legislation, presidential order, executive branch powers, or via regulatory implementation ..."

Sept 16: 4 of the 8 members of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights jointly wrote a strongly-worded 5-page letter to President Obama opposing any attempt to use executive action to give federal recognition to an Akaka tribe. The letter reiterated reasons for opposing the concept of the Akaka bill, expressed in several official statements by USCCR in previous years, and added objections to the new concept of using executive authority to do what Congress has refused to do for 13 years. The USCCR letter, dated September 16, 2013 on official letterhead and bearing the signatures of the 4 Commissioners, can be seen at
http://big09.angelfire.com/USCCR091613LtrOpposingAkakaExec.pdf

Sept 17: (1) The Washington Times published a news report about the USCCR letter.; (2) Roger Clegg (Center for Equal Opportunity) short news report in National Review online, entitled "A Good Message for Constitution Day"

Sept 18: (1) The Grassroot Institute of Hawaii issued a press release about the USCCR letter.; (2) Honolulu Advertiser online blogger describes the USCCR letter; (3) Michael Barone, The Washington Examiner, reports on the USCCR letter and gives brief history of efforts to pass the Akaka bill.

Sep 28: Connecticut Governor and Attorney General oppose changes in federal recognition procedures that would allow Indian groups previously rejected for recognition to get it.

October 30, 2013: The Little Shell tribe of Montana is seeking federal recognition through a bill in Congress, although it can also hope for recognition through a revised Dept of Interior process now being developed. It has been seeking recognition for 50 years.

Oct 31: The Lumbee Tribe of North Carolina is seeking recognition through a bill in Congress because language in the existing Dept. of Interior regulations does not allow administrative recognition for them.

November 1, 2013: OHA chairperson Colette Machado editorial says all paths to Hawaiian sovereignty should be pursued including Kana'iolowalu state recognized tribe, Akaka bill or Presidential executive action for federal recognition, and international action for full independent nationhood; and Hawaiians who favor one mode should not oppose those who favor other modes because all will converge like rivers to an ocean.

Nov 21: IMPORTANT E-MAIL dated October 18 is posted on a secessionist blog, sent from OHA trustee Oswald Stender to all other trustees and to commissioners of the Kana'iolowalu racial registry, urging that no more money be spent on recruiting for the registry. "When you add what was spent for Kau Inoa, OHA has spent over $10,000,000 for 120,000 registrants out of 500,000."

Nov 23: Today is the 20th anniversary of President Clinton's signing of the apology resolution which commemorated the 100th year since the 1893 overthrow of the Hawaiian kingdom. A front page article in the Honolulu Star-Advertiser noted that the federal government has not taken steps toward reconciliation with Native Hawaiians as called for in the resolution; the Akaka bill has failed in Congress; and the independence activists don't want the Akaka bill anyway, because they want secession.

Nov 26: The Heritage Foundation releases a position paper opposing S.J.Res12, which proposes an amendment to the Hawaiian Homes Commission Act of 1920. Many of the points in the position paper also apply to federal recognition for a Hawaiian tribe whether through an Akaka bill or through executive action.

Nov 27: Honolulu Star-Advertiser editorial recalls the apology resolution from 20 years ago and once again urges federal recognition for an ethnic Hawaiian tribe not yet created.

December 1, 2013: Three articles from the monthly OHA newspaper: (1) News report says OHA trustees have appropriated $600,000 as a final amount to pay for Kana'iolowalu, the racial registry, [which brings the total to $4 Million for this project] producing very low numbers of registrants, and no more will be spent; (2) A trustee column explains her decision to vote to end the project; (3) A trustee column says several major ethnic Hawaiian institutions have come together in a process to assemble the elements of an ethnic Hawaiian nation, and this process of nation-building can continue regardless whether such a nation gets political recognition from the U.S. as an Indian tribe or from the United Nations as an independent nation.

Dec 9: Trisha Kehaulani Watson article in Honolulu Civil Beat says the Kana'iolowalu racial registry process is not working and should be abandoned. Instead she favors setting up a federal commission comparable to the Native Hawaiians Study Commission from the 1980s, to review the whole situation and figure out how to accomplish restoration of a Hawaiian nation, restitution for past harms done by the U.S., and recognition of Hawaiian self-determination.

Dec. 11: Honolulu Star-Advertiser published three items about Hawaiian sovereignty: (1) News report about the annual "State of OHA" event featuring keynote speaker retired Senator Daniel Akaka and OHA chair Colette Machado telling 350 people that OHA's primary focus will be nation-building and federal recognition; (2) Guest commentary by Keoni Dudley on behalf of a group of independence activists saying now is a good time to seek sovereignty; (3) Guest commentary by Ken Conklin pointing out the racial divisiveness of federal recognition and how it would suddenly impose on Hawaii a large number of federal Indian laws whose impact would be like invasive species.

Dec 12: Honolulu Star-Advertiser online poll about Hawaiian sovereignty offered 3 choices. 56% voted against any form of sovereignty for ethnic Hawaiians; 29% voted in favor of creating an Akaka tribe; 15% voted in favor of secession (independent nationhood for Hawaii).

Dec 15: Want a Gambling Casino in Hawaii? Get Recognition for a Hawaiian Tribe.

Dec 16: Two letters to editor in Honolulu Star-Advertiser praise the December 11 commentaries about Hawaiian sovereignty, and express worries about it.

Dec. 26: The Native Hawaiian Roll Commission has gathered 101,130 registrants as of Christmas 2013, including more than 71,000 names transferred from Kau Inoa and Operation Ohana. About 60 chose to opt out of having their names transferred. It started the effort with the goal of collecting 200,000 names by last July.

Dec. 30: In a year-end interview of both Hawaii Senators and both Hawaii Representatives, Colleen Hanabusa was the only one who expressed disappointment at the lack of progress on federal recognition for a Hawaiian tribe, and for her it is the most important issue. She says an executive order is the most likely scenario.

END OF INDEX OF NEWS REPORTS AND COMMENTARIES FROM JUNE 1, 2013 to December 31, 2013. History of the Hawaiian Government Reorganization bill in the 113th Congress from June 1, 2013 and continuing. Hawaii and Alaska delegations meet to solidify support for Akaka bill. Keli'i Akina, President of Grassroot Institute, gives major speech opposing Akaka bill and racial registry and affirming patriotism to America. June 11 (Kamehameha Day holiday in Hawaii) U.S. Senator Schatz gives speech on Senate floor calling for federal recognition of Akaka tribe [no bill introduced yet, but rumors of activity in executive branch], and is supported by Senators Cantwell, Begich, Murkowski, and Franken -- all 5 are members of the Indian Affairs committee. Point by point rebuttal by Conklin. New state law effective July 1 allows the Kanaiolowalu racial registry to automatically add all the names of all the people whose native ancestry has previously been verified by other institutions. Published news reports about, and editorials favoring, efforts to get federal recognition for Akaka tribe through changes in bureaucratic procedures under 25CFR83 or Presidential executive order. 4 of 8 Commissioners of U.S. Commission on Civil Rights then wrote letter to President Obama opposing concept of the Akaka tribe and abuse of executive authority. OHA trustee Oswald Stender says $10 Million already spent [during 9 years] to recruit 120,000 signups for racial registry (out of 529,000 possible) and no more money should be spent. OHA trustees make final payment to close the racial registry and certify a membership roll. Only 30,000 people signed up, while 71,000 had their names automatically transferred by bureaucrats from earlier racial registries.
For full text of each item above go to
http://www.angelfire.com/big09/AkakaHistStartJune012013.html


=====================


INDEX OF NEWS REPORTS AND COMMENTARIES FROM JANUARY 1 THROUGH APRIL 30, 2014 (including efforts to create a state-recognized tribe and assemble a racial registry for a membership roll). See March 7 for OHA news release and 3 important documents regarding reopening of enrollment in racial registry and timetable of steps OHA will take to facilitate ethnic nation-building throughout 2014.
For full text of each item below go to
http://www.angelfire.com/big09/AkakaHistStartJan012014.html

January 4, 2014: Investigative reporter succeeds in registering "Sanford Dole" in the Kana'iolowalu racial registry (Dole was leader of the Hawaiian revolution of 1893 that overthrew the monarchy, and served as President of the Republic of Hawaii. He had no Hawaiian native blood).

Jan 10: Ken Conklin sent letters to leaders of mainland Indian tribes, and to the Hawaii Coalition Against Legalized Gambling, to alert them to the dangers of state and/or federal recognition for a phony "Native Hawaiian" tribe. The dangers are especially bad if federal recognition comes through an administrative action or Presidential Executive Order, because then the provisions found in the Congressional Akaka bill to prohibit the Hawaiian tribe from operating gambling casinos or grabbing Indian tribe entitlements would no longer be present.

Jan 13: Grassroot Institute President Keli'i Akina spent 54 minutes interviewing OHA Trustee Oswald Stender on many topics, especially focusing on Stender's opinion that the very low enrollment in the OHA-sponsored racial registry, despite expenditure of several million dollars, shows that ethnic Hawaiians simply are not interested in building a race-based government.

Jan 21: Dan Akaka, retired chairman of the Senate Indian Affairs Committee, and Dr. Michael Chun, retired President of Kamehameha Schools, published a commentary in Indian Country Today endorsing Colleen Hanabusa in her candidacy for U.S. Senate from Hawaii because of her previous work in pushing the Akaka bill while a member of Congress and her work pushing Hawaiian racial entitlements in the Hawaii state Senate.

March 7: (1) Honolulu Star-Advertiser reported on a pep rally at OHA headquarters for an announcement that OHA is reviving the Kana'iolowalu racial registry and will allow additional people to register. So far 107,039 names are on the registry [however, according to OHA's monthly newspaper for December 2013, 87,000 of those registrants never directly signed up for Kana'iolowalu and were simply transferred from earlier racial registries without being asked for their permission]; (2) Contents of OHA press release, and Statement of Commitment on Governance, and Statement on Hawaiian Nation-Building, and Flyer showing steps and timetable for the process of rebuilding the Hawaiian nation.

March 14: OHA trustee Peter Apo issued a press release describing OHA's plan to facilitate the creation of a race-based government and then OHA will phase itself out of existence and transfer its $550 Million in assets to the new tribe. Detailed budgets for facilitating the transition are included.

March 16: The Kana'iolowalu racial registry will accept additional registrants from March 17 to May 1. There are now 120,743 names on the list as the roll commission continues to verify ancestry.

March 19: OHA trustee Peter Apo says "OHA is on the brink of putting itself out of business -- but breathing life into its successor" and "If we, all of us who share this place called Hawaii, are to free ourselves of the yoke of injustice and breaches of human dignity and become whole, the ĎAha must succeed."

March 22: One week after OHA pledged to be a neutral facilitator to help members of the racial registry figure out what path to pursue to "nationhood", OHA trustees, attorneys, and lobbyists went to Washington for a secret meeting with the Department of interior to continue pushing their concept of federal recognition for a Hawaiian Indian tribe now being built from scratch.

March 29: OHA's "New Body Politic" Will Exclude 77% of Native Hawaiians

April 1: OHA's monthly newspaper for April contains a special section about the nation-building process and the Kana'iolowalu racial registry. At 7 megabytes it includes a beautiful photo of Iolani Palace bedecked with Kingdom flags and bunting, a description of the process to be followed for the remainder of 2014, and a registration form including the affirmations.
http://www.oha.org/sites/files/KWO414_WEB.pdf

April 4: OHA press release announcing series of meetings throughout Hawaiian islands and also on mainland to recruit more ethnic Hawaiians to sign up on the racial registry.

April 11: OHA community meeting about nation-building in Keaukaha, Hawaii Island, showed most in attendance oppose OHA's plans. Full video of 1 hour 54 minutes.

April 12: Broken Trust Gang Busted: OHA Admits to Secret Meeting With US Department of Interior, just days after promising to be a neutral facilitator.

April 13: Kona newspaper summarizes OHA's efforts in nation-building, and reports on an OHA community meeting on April 11 in Waimea, Hawaii Island, where most attendees oppose OHA's plans because they favor complete secession from the U.S.

April 16: Hawaiian independence activist reports that in response to numerous protests at community meetings, OHA has agreed to suspend for two years its efforts to pursue the Kana'iolowalu racial registry and OHA's efforts to seek federal recognition.

April 27: OHA CEO commentary in Honolulu newspaper "Hawaiians stake claim to nation-building" outlines plan for how the Kana'iolowalu racial registry will be used to "build a nation."

END OF INDEX OF NEWS REPORTS AND COMMENTARIES FROM JANUARY 1 THROUGH APRIL 30, 2014 (including efforts to create a state-recognized tribe and assemble a racial registry for a membership roll). See March 7 for OHA news release and 3 important documents regarding reopening of enrollment in racial registry and timetable of steps OHA will take to facilitate ethnic nation-building throughout 2014.
For full text of each item above go to
http://www.angelfire.com/big09/AkakaHistStartJan012014.html


=====================


INDEX OF NEWS REPORTS AND COMMENTARIES FROM MAY 1 THROUGH MAY 31, 2014 (including efforts to create a state-recognized tribe and assemble a racial registry for a membership roll). Extended enrollment on the Kanaiolowalu racial registry ended on May 1, 2014 with 125,631 names (including about 87,000 transferred from earlier racial registries going back 10 years, without permission of those individuals). [Census 2010 showed more than 527,000 people in the United States reported Native Hawaiian ancestry, including 290,000 living in Hawaii.] OHA CEO sends letter on official stationery to Secretary of State John Kerry, citing work of Keanu Sai, asking for official ruling on whether the Kingdom of Hawaii still exists and has sovereignty, and says if so then OHA will stop the nation-building effort for fear of prosecution for war crimes. OHA trustees unanimously rescind the letter, but Grassroot Institute says OHA CEO letter reflects trustees real attitude that U.S. lacks sovereignty. A huge controversy erupted, and several OHA trustees changed their minds and supported the CEO and urged that the nationbuilding project should stop at least temporarily. Many ethnic Hawaiians protest at OHA board meeting, demanding OHA get out of the way of efforts to achieve total independence. U.S. Department of the Interior begins preliminary rule-making to create a Hawaiian tribe by administrative action.
For full text of each item below go to
http://www.angelfire.com/big09/AkakaHistStartMay012014.html

May 1, 2014: OHA monthly newspaper describes community meetings regarding the racial registry and nation-building process: (1) OHA convenes fourth summit on rebuilding a hawaiian nation; (2) On Moloka'i, Nation-building discussion centers on next steps

May 3: Honolulu Star-Advertiser reports that the extended registration period for the racial registry finally ended on May 1. A total of 125,631 names have been listed (with a few thousand more awaiting processing), including about 10,000 who registered during the six week extended period after March 17. "According to the 2010 census, more than 527,000 people in the United States reported Native Hawaiian ancestry, including 290,000 living in Hawaii."
** Note from Ken Conklin: According to OHA's monthly newspaper for December 2013, 87,000 of those registrants never directly signed up for Kana'iolowalu and were simply transferred from earlier racial registries without being asked for their permission. Thus only about 38,000 have directly signed up for the new registry which includes several affirmations never requested in earlier registries, including "I affirm the unrelinquished sovereignty of the Native Hawaiian people" and also "I have a significant social, cultural, or civic connection to the Native Hawaiian community." Thus the 87,000 names added without permission of those individuals are now made to look like they subscribed to those two new affirmations when in fact they did not. The signature form does not require notarizing; and the racial requirement is the only element that requires documented proof (but not the alleged connection to the Native Hawaiian community). Thus it is clear that race is the only requirement which OHA takes seriously enough to require verification, and not the so-called political elements which characterize the genuine Indian tribes. The 125,631 names listed as of May 2 includes all names collected in the Kau Inoa racial registry that began on January 17, 2004 -- a period of more than 10 years including massive advertising in newspapers and on TV and in community events both in Hawaii and on the mainland, including a free T-shirt for each registrant, with expenditure of many but undisclosed millions of dollars.

May 6: 3 articles in Hawaii newspapers celebrate the wrap-up of the extended registration period for the Native Hawaiian Roll, and report on the May 5 informational briefing by the Roll Commission at the state Senate Committee on Hawaiian Affairs.

May 9: (1) Ken Conklin article and related webpage "Building a Hawaiian tribe in the Legislature: Kana'iolowalu status report May 2014; (2) TV news report "Agency seeks clarity on Hawaiian Kingdom status -- Office of Hawaiian Affairs CEO Kamanaopono Crabbe says he will seek approval from the agency's trustees to refrain from pursuing a Native Hawaiian governing entity."

May 10: (1) Honolulu Star-Advertiser reports that OHA CEO Kamana'opono Crabbe wrote a letter to Secretary of State John Kerry requesting an official statement confirming or denying whether the Kingdom of Hawaii still exists as an independent sovereign nation, because if it does then Crabbe, OHA, and the Roll Commission could be prosecuted for war crimes and should stop the Kana'iolowalu process; but then OHA sent a letter to Kerry rescinding Crabbe's letter. Both letters, on official stationery, are exhibited in the online version of the news report and on this webpage; (2) Dr. Keli'i Akina, President of the Grassroot Institute of Hawaii, issues a press release: "The trustees of the Office of Hawaiian Affairs have embarrassed the State of Hawaii and must be held accountable for recent statements in a letter by its CEO to the U.S. Department of State questioning the legitimacy of American and Hawaii State sovereignty in the Hawaiian islands."

May 11: Vicki Viotti, editorial writer for Honolulu Star-Advertiser, has a lengthy essay supporting OHA's nation-building efforts but taking note of some objections to it.

May 12: Honolulu Civil Beat reporter Chad Blair summarized events in the conflict between OHA trustee chair Machado and OHA CEO Crabbe. It seems Crabbe was lying when he said he had met with Machado before making his letter public and she had given her blessing to it.

May 13: (1) Honolulu Star-Advertiser report summarized events in the conflict between OHA trustee chair Machado and OHA CEO Crabbe. It seems Crabbe was lying when he said he had met with Machado before making his letter public and she had given her blessing to it. Machado asked Crabbe to cancel a news conference but Crabbe held it anyway, with maybe 100 supporters including heavy-hitters. An online petition with more than 1100 signatures supports Crabbe.;
(2) Kaua'i newspaper reports about the controversy, and adds that OHA Kaua'i trustee Ahuna changed his mind and removed his name from the previously unanimous trustee letter rescinding Crabbe's letter to Kerry. The Kaua'i branch of a sovereignty group supports Crabbe.;
(3) Hawaii Free Press publishes "OHA Chaos: Machado, Crabbe Dueling Statements (full text)" [* note from Ken Conklin: These two important statements are well worth reading];
(4) Hilo newspaper letter from Kamana Beamer, who created an online petition which has gotten more than 2,000 signatures supporting Crabbe.;
(5) Hawaii News Now reports additional quotes from Crabbe and Machado showing the deep division between them.

May 14: (1) Jay Fidell, Think Tech Hawaii, 52 minute video of interview of Keli'i Akina, President of Grassroot Institute of Hawaii, about his candidacy for OHA trustee. Akina emphasizes he is "Proud to be American and Hawaiian" and he criticizes OHA trustees for pandering to a secessionist belief which encourages the concept that Hawaii remains an independent nation not part of the U.S., shown in CEO Crabbe's letter to Secretary of State Kerry. See the video at
http://tinyurl.com/mdc5nnw ;
(2) OHA apparently violated state Sunshine Law with secret meeting(s) in Washington, DC, when they decided to rescind CEO Crabbe's letter to Kerry;
(3) Trisha Kehaulani Watson article in Huffington post outlines the sequence of events leading up to OHA CEO letter to Secretary of State Kerry. "Some believe the Trustees may attempt to remove Crabbe from his position for sending the letter, but for the last few years, Crabbe has used his hiring authority within the Office to strategically hire friends and allies. Trustees must consider whether or not they would face a crippling exodus by Crabbe's staff if they make any further moves to censure or remove him."

May 15: President of a secessionist Hawaiian Civic Club calls upon all OHA trustees to support CEO Crabbe's letter to Kerry, because Crabbe's questions deserve to be answered.

May 16: (1) Editorial says OHA as facilitator of nation-building must speak with unified voice, and CEO Crabbe was out-of line and disruptive; (2) Letter to editor praises Crabbe for courage in trying to set straight the historical record.

May 17: OHA trustee Peter Apo published a message on his personal blog saying he now opposes OHA's nationbuilding effort because it is divisive and interferes with the ability of grassroot ethnic Hawaiians to be heard, and has cost multimillions of dollars that could be put to better use.
[* Ken Conklin's note: three out of nine OHA trustees have now publicly said they want to stop the nationbuilding project at least temporarily: Ahuna, Apo, Carmen Lindsey; and Stender also said so in a YouTube interview a few weeks ago. The so-called "ho'oponopono" (reconciliation) trustee meeting with CEO Crabbe on Monday should produce a lot of upheaval, at least in private]

Sunday May 18: (1) Honolulu Star-Advertiser reports "The dustup between Office of Hawaiian Affairs CEO Kamana'opono Crabbe and his bosses, the OHA board of trustees, has caused a mighty ruckus in the Hawaiian community since May 9. But it's still unclear what impact Crabbe's "unauthorized" letter to Secretary of State John Kerry seeking an opinion on the legal status of the Hawaiian Kingdom will have on OHA's support for a campaign that aims to conduct formal nation-building through the Native Hawaiian Roll Commission."
(2) Star-dvertiser columnist David Shapiro says "The chaos created in the Office of Hawaiian Affairs by CEO Kamana'opono Crabbe has squashed what little credibility existed for the Native Hawaiian Roll, Kana'iolowalu. It's time to halt this failed project before we dump potentially hundreds of millions in public resources into a settlement with Hawaiians that settles nothing.
(3) Letter to editor by former OHA trustee says "I commend Kamana'opono Crabbe for doing his fiduciary duty and due diligence in the questions raised to Secretary of State John Kerry -- questions about the legal status of our kanakamaoli under international law that should have been raised long ago by Office of Hawaiian Affairs trustees."

May 19: (1) Grassroot institute press release applauds the calls by some OHA trustees to halt nationbuilding; (2) and (3) Honolulu Star-Advertiser breaking news at 3:08 PM and at 6:48 PM provide details about how ethnic Hawaiians present at OHA headquarters conducted themselves during the board meeting; (4) Hawaii News Now (3 TV stations) reports statements to the media after the board meeting, by OHA CEO Crabbe and by the OHA board, and complaints filed with the state Office of Information Practices regarding violations of the open-meeting law last week in Washington. OHA will hold a public meeting on May 29 for community feedback on how to move forward with nation-building.

May 20: (1) Honolulu Star-Advertiser says Talks bring OHA back onto '1 path'. Crabbe keeps his job, and OHA moves forward with nationbuilding although perhaps on a slower schedule to allow more input.; (2) Honolulu Civil Beat similar story with additional details: OHA legal counsel Robert Klein (former Supreme Court Justice) dismissed worries about the sunshine law, although one trustee said he's still scared about it.

May 23: (1) "Jim Crow Prowls Paradise" article in PJ Media compares racially exclusionary voter registries in Hawaii, Guam, and CNMI (Commonwealth of Northern Mariana Islands) that will be used for government-sponsored elections, and federal court decision regarding CNMI.; (2) Press release by Grassroot Institute describes federal court decision voiding the CNMI racially exclusionary voter registry.

May 24: (1) Hawaii Free Press reports U.S. Department of the Interior begins preliminary rule-making to create a Hawaiian tribe by administrative action. Link is provided to view the proposal on official government webpage;
(2) Michael Barone, columnist in The Washington Examiner, says "Obama Interior Department reviving a truly bad policy Congress has rejected"

May 25: Honolulu Star-Advertiser news report about the U.S. Department of Interior beginning a process to use its rule-making power to recognize ethnic Hawaiians as indigenous as a way to protect racial entitlement programs. Article includes comments by OHA trustee Oswald Stender praising the process and Grassroot Institute President Keli'i Akina opposing it.

May 26: (1) Honolulu Star-Advertiser reports OHA will hold a special meeting on May 29 to gather public comment on OHA's nation-building efforts; (2) Attorner Paul Mirengoff, in a think tank called "Power Line", posts a blog entry criticizing Obama effort to create Hawaiian tribe through administrative action.

May 27: (1) Ken Conklin short essay "Stop Appeasing Hawaii's Racial Separatists";
(2) Roger Clegg, Center for Equal Opportunity, in National Review Online: "the administration is attempting an end-run of Congress here, which has repeatedly refused to go down the road of making Native Hawaiians into some sort of Indian tribe -- and rightly so.";
(3) Ilya Shapiro, CATO Institute: "Obama Administration Abuses Executive Power to Pursue Race-Based Government";
(4) Fox News: "President Barack Obama's administration has quietly suggested it is willing to create a two-tier race-based legal system in Hawaii, where one set of taxes, spending and law enforcement will govern one race, and the second set of laws will govern every other race. ... If you can do that with groups that are already part of the mainstream, you can balkanize the country, said Heriot, who is a law professor at the University of San Diego.";
(5) Grassroot Institute of Hawaii: "Further investigation of the Department of the Interior's plan to recognize a Native Hawaiian governing entity via administrative rule has revealed that the agency has been secretly working toward such an action since at least 2012. ... The mad rush to create a Native Hawaiian government over the concerns and objections of legal scholars, the public, and the Native Hawaiian community itself makes one question OHA's motivations. The Constitution is not on their side, whether they pursue a race-based election or attempt an end-run around Congress by trying to create a race-based nation via executive action. It is unlikely that either will withstand a legal challenge."

May 28: (1) Washington Times: "Native Hawaiians would be 'Indians' under Obama plan" Article includes statements by Gail Heriot and U.S. Commission on Civil Rights, Keli'i Akina (Grassroot Institute of Hawaii), Senator Brian Schatz, and others.
(2) Frontpage Magazine columnist Daniel Greenfield article "Divide and Conquer: Obama Inc. Wants Tribal Status for Hawaiians" says "There's no end to the malicious acts of political vandalism coming out of Washington D.C. lately. This latest one would use indigenous legislation to revert Hawaiians from Americans to tribal members."
(3) "Breaking News" from Honolulu Star-Advertiser (not published in the physical newspaper even the following day!) "The federal government is considering re-establishing a government-to-government relationship with Native Hawaiians, just weeks after the head of the Office of Hawaiian Affairs sought clarity on whether the Hawaiian Kingdom still exists in the eyes of the United States."

May 29: (1) OHA meeting to air Native Hawaiian disagreements. The meeting also comes on the heels of a May 20 notice from the U.S. Department of Interior signaling itís considering whether the federal government should develop a formal, administrative process to re-establish a government-to-government relationship with a future Native Hawaiian governing entity;
(2) OHA month;y newspaper for June, made available on OHA website today, uses a dialog format to describe the reconciliation meeting between OHA CEO Crabbe and board chair Machado

May 30: (1) Honolulu Star-Advertiser reports OHA CEO Crabbe says the push for sovereignty should be delayed to allow ethnic Hawaiians more time to get educated; comments from some constituents who attended the May 29 meeting at OHA headquarters;
(2) Hilo and Kona newspapers provide more in-depth details about OHA's May 29 meeting, including constituents urging OHA to step aside and allow Hawaiians to press for total independence;
(3) Honolulu Civil Beat online newspaper reports more details about OHA's May 29 meeting. "A popular refrain during public testimony Thursday morning was that Hawaiian sovereignty endures and that federal recognition similar to that of many Native American tribes wouldnít be adequate. ... Crabbe told reporters after the hearing that OHA may not be the best agency to facilitate the nation-building process, which he described as a work in progress."

END OF INDEX OF NEWS REPORTS AND COMMENTARIES FROM MAY 1 THROUGH MAY 31, 2014 (including efforts to create a state-recognized tribe and assemble a racial registry for a membership roll). Extended enrollment on the Kanaiolowalu racial registry ended on May 1, 2014 with 125,631 names (including about 87,000 transferred from earlier racial registries going back 10 years, without permission of those individuals). [Census 2010 showed more than 527,000 people in the United States reported Native Hawaiian ancestry, including 290,000 living in Hawaii.] OHA CEO sends letter on official stationery to Secretary of State John Kerry, citing work of Keanu Sai, asking for official ruling on whether the Kingdom of Hawaii still exists and has sovereignty, and says if so then OHA will stop the nation-building effort for fear of prosecution for war crimes. OHA trustees unanimously rescind the letter, but Grassroot Institute says OHA CEO letter reflects trustees real attitude that U.S. lacks sovereignty. A huge controversy erupted, and several OHA trustees changed their minds and supported the CEO and urged that the nationbuilding project should stop at least temporarily. Many ethnic Hawaiians protest at OHA board meeting, demanding OHA get out of the way of efforts to achieve total independence. U.S. Department of the Interior begins preliminary rule-making to create a Hawaiian tribe by administrative action.
For full text of each item above go to
http://www.angelfire.com/big09/AkakaHistStartMay012014.html


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INDEX OF NEWS REPORTS AND COMMENTARIES DURING JUNE 2014 (including efforts to create a state-recognized tribe or get federal recognition through administrative rule changes). REPRESENTATIVES FROM THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF INTERIOR AND U.S. DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE WILL HOLD PUBLIC HEARINGS THROUGHOUT HAWAII FROM JUNE 23 TO JULY 8 REGARDING PLANS TO CREATE A HAWAIIAN TRIBE THROUGH A RULE-MAKING PROCESS AND GIVE FEDERAL RECOGNITION TO IT. THERE WILL ALSO BE 5 MORE MEETINGS ABOUT THE HAWAIIAN TRIBE IN "INDIAN COUNTRY" IN MINNESOTA, SOUTH DAKOTA, WASHINGTON STATE, ARIZONA, AND CONNECTICUT FROM JULY 29 TO AUGUST 7. See June 20 for full text of detailed Federal Register Advance notice of proposed rulemaking; solicitation of comments. The vast majority of people who testified were ethnic Hawaiians strongly opposed to federal recognition on the grounds that the U.S. has no legal jurisdiction in Hawaii on account of illegal overthrow of monarchy (1893) and illegal annexation (1898).
For full text of each item below go to
http://www.angelfire.com/big09/AkakaHistStartJun012014.html

June 1, 2014: Honolulu Star-Advertiser columnist provides his view of "Why Inouye steered clear of Hawaiian sovereignty" [* which is false, because Inouye was the main pusher of the Akaka bill to convert a racial group into a fake Indian tribe and give it federally recognized sovereignty!]

June 2: The Hawaii newspaper with largest circulation conducted an online poll advertised in the physical newspaper, asking "What kind of future do you favor for Native Hawaiians?" Four choices were offered. The winner, with 41% of the vote, was "No entitlements at all." In second place "Federal recognition" with 31%. "The status quo" got 22%; and "Independence" got only 6%.

June 3: Grassroot Institute of Hawaii press release about the June 2 newspaper poll: "In more than a decade, despite millions of dollars spent pushing for the creation of a Native Hawaiian government, OHA has failed to persuade the people of Hawaii that this is a good thing for our state or for Native Hawaiians. That represents millions of dollars that could have been spent helping the Native Hawaiian community in more effective, less divisive ways."

June 4: Grassroot Institute President, Dr. Keli'i Akina, publishes article in "The Daily Caller" describing the Obama administration's attempt to use executive authority to give federal recognition to a not-yet-created Hawaiian tribe as an end-run around both Congress and the courts.

June 8: "Native Hawaiians ponder the pathways" Lengthy article in Kona newspaper describes pathways ethnic Hawaiians might pursue, and how some Hawaii Island elected officials approach the topic.

June 11 (Kamehameha Day holiday): Honolulu Star-Advertiser ran side-by-side essays on Hawaiian sovereignty:
(1) Keli'i Akina, President of Grassroot Institute and candidate for OHA trustee, opposing racial separatism vs.
(2) Brickwood Galuteria, state Senator and activist for OHA nationbuilding and federal recognition of a Hawaiian tribe.
also
(3) Letter in Kona newspaper, commenting on June 8 article, says ethnic Hawaiians remain divided on sovereignty because OHA and state have failed to provide funds to continue the Hawaiian Sovereignty Elections Council which could have educated everyone.

June 15: 2 letters to editor: (1) Entitlements subvert quest for sovereignty (When one group of people is subsidized by another group, the former develops an "entitlement mentality" that stifles improvement, because failure can always be blamed on the other side.) (2) Hawaiians want what was originally theirs (The Kingdom of Hawaii was pre-empted by the terrorist invasion of our internationally acknowledged sovereign nation in 1893)

June 18: REPRESENTATIVES FROM THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF INTERIOR AND U.S. DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE WILL HOLD PUBLIC HEARINGS THROUGHOUT HAWAII FROM JUNE 23 TO JULY 8 REGARDING PLANS TO CREATE A HAWAIIAN TRIBE THROUGH A RULE-MAKING PROCESS AND GIVE FEDERAL RECOGNITION TO IT. THERE WILL ALSO BE 5 MORE MEETINGS ABOUT THE HAWAIIAN TRIBE IN "INDIAN COUNTRY" IN MINNESOTA, SOUTH DAKOTA, WASHINGTON STATE, ARIZONA, AND CONNECTICUT FROM JULY 29 TO AUGUST 7. (1) Honolulu Star-Advertiser brief "breaking news" report; (2) Governor Abercrombie brief news release; (3) Detailed news report providing Dept of Interior answers to frequently asked questions about this specific plan, along with dates and places of hearings.

June 19: (1) Honolulu Star-Advertiser lengthy article describes federal rule-making process to create and recognize a Hawaiian tribe, how to provide testimony electronically, and dates and places of public hearings in Hawaii and on the mainland; (2) Press release: Native American Contractors Association Supports U.S. Department of Interior on Consideration of Consultation with the Native Hawaiian Community

June 20: (1) The feasibility of both the state and federal push to create a sovereign Native Hawaiian nation was brought into sharp question today as two authorities with very different perspectives on the issue expressed their doubts as to whether either plan would come to fruition. At Grassroot Institute forum OHA Trustee Stender and Former AG [state attorney general] Lilly question current efforts to create a sovereign Hawaiian nation.
(2) Political Columnist Richard Borreca describes upcoming public meetings on federal administrative recognition of Hawaiian tribe, warns the meetings are likely to be disruptive, and concludes "No matter how enlightened the effort, making a decision about Hawaii should be made by the people who live here, not by one person in Washington. Resolution of these questions should not happen until all Hawaii voters, and not just Native Hawaiians, are involved and enfranchised.";
(3) FEDERAL REGISTER FOR JUNE 20 HAS LENGTHY ANNOUNCEMENT OF PROPOSED ADMINISTRATIVE RULE-MAKING TO CREATE HAWAIIAN TRIBE AND GIVE IT FEDERAL RECOGNITION. THE NOTICE IS PACKED WITH DETAILED CITATIONS OF COURT DECISIONS AND PREVIOUS ACTIONS BY FEDERAL GOVERNMENT IN RELATION TO NATIVE HAWAIIANS. The entire lengthy notice is copied below, and can be downloaded in pdf format directly from the Federal Register at
http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2014-06-20/pdf/2014-14430.pdf

June 22: Honolulu Star-Advertiser once again editorializes in favor of creating a federally recognized Hawaiian tribe; takes note of Hawaiian independence activists opposing it; says the administrative process will likely succeed if ethnic Hawaiians unite in support of it; and in one sentence dismisses non-ethnic-Hawaiian opposition about divisiveness.

June 23: (1) Grassroot Institute press release summarizing its testimony opposing federal rule-making to create and recognize Hawaiian tribe; (2) Short "breaking news" report on Department of Interior hearing at state capitol; (3) Considerably longer "breaking news" report given different headline and details after the Capitol hearing ended; (4) Trisha Watson, Honolulu Civil Beat: "So the Interior Department Wants Input on Hawaiian Nation-Building? There is no justification for denying Hawaiians an opportunity to become fully educated on their history so they can make informed decisions."

June 24: (1) Honolulu Star-Advertiser: Hawaiians reject federal input. Interior Department meetings draw testimony opposed to recognition of a future native nation; (2) Honolulu Civil Beat: Kanaka Maoli to Feds: 'Get Out of Our House! Go Home!' Interior Department receives a resounding "no" to federal recognition of Native Hawaiians.

June 25: (1) Honolulu Star-Advertiser: "Feds mark fury from Hawaiians over 1893 overthrow" reporting on the hearings in Nanakuli.
(2) Kevin K. Washburn, Assistant Secretary of Interior for Indian Affairs, interview in "Indian Country Today" regarding federal rule-making to create a Hawaiian tribe. "I jokingly carry a sign now that says 'US Out of North America' -- but it's a joke. But, no, I don't think we're talking about disestablishing the State of Hawaii or anything like that. We're just talking about trying to engage in a constructive way with the Native Hawaiian community.

June 26: (1) Honolulu Star-Advertiser reports "Conduct at meetings bemoaned; Some observers are concerned moderate Hawaiians are not speaking at federal hearings." (2) Letter to editor: "Until the Department of Hawaiian Home Lands can be managed professionally, forget about it. It would be another avenue for the cronyism that prevails in Hawaii."

June 27: News report describes disorderly Department of Interior hearing in Kapolei, which is the last hearing on O'ahu.

June 28: Indian Country Today interviews Connecticut professor: "Like the Akaka bill that was reintroduced time and again from 2000-2012, federal recognition -- whether through the legislative branch or the executive branch -- is an effort by the U.S. government and its subsidiary, "the 50th state," to extinguish the outstanding sovereignty claims to national sovereignty under international law since if a substantial proportion of the Hawaiian people go the domestic route, their participation in the legal fiction could be used as evidence of acquiescence."

June 29: Emotions run high but remain in check at Molokai hearing

END OF INDEX OF NEWS REPORTS AND COMMENTARIES DURING JUNE 2014 (including efforts to create a state-recognized tribe or get federal recognition through administrative rule changes). REPRESENTATIVES FROM THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF INTERIOR AND U.S. DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE WILL HOLD PUBLIC HEARINGS THROUGHOUT HAWAII FROM JUNE 23 TO JULY 8 REGARDING PLANS TO CREATE A HAWAIIAN TRIBE THROUGH A RULE-MAKING PROCESS AND GIVE FEDERAL RECOGNITION TO IT. THERE WILL ALSO BE 5 MORE MEETINGS ABOUT THE HAWAIIAN TRIBE IN "INDIAN COUNTRY" IN MINNESOTA, SOUTH DAKOTA, WASHINGTON STATE, ARIZONA, AND CONNECTICUT FROM JULY 29 TO AUGUST 7. See June 20 for full text of detailed Federal Register Advance notice of proposed rulemaking; solicitation of comments. The vast majority of people who testified were ethnic Hawaiians strongly opposed to federal recognition on the grounds that the U.S. has no legal jurisdiction in Hawaii on account of illegal overthrow of monarchy (1893) and illegal annexation (1898).
For full text of each item above go to
http://www.angelfire.com/big09/AkakaHistStartJun012014.html


=====================


INDEX OF NEWS REPORTS AND COMMENTARIES STARTING JULY 1, 2014 AND CONTINUING (including efforts to create a state-recognized tribe or get federal recognition through administrative rule changes). History of the Hawaiian Government Reorganization bill in the 113th Congress starting July 1, 2014 and continuing (including efforts to create a state-recognized tribe or get federal recognition through administrative rule changes). Series of 15 public hearings by U.S. Department of Interior on 6 islands wraps up with overwhelming opposition to DOI concept of using administrative rule-making to create a hawaiian tribe and give it federal recognition. DOI hearings at 4 locations on mainland take place late July and early August. OHA stretches its nationbuilding timetable to run 6 extra months for educating the public, until July 2015.
For full text of each item below go to
http://www.angelfire.com/big09/AkakaHistStartJuly012014.html

July 1, 2014: Crowds of Native Hawaiian supporters decry federal recognition at Department of Interior public meeting in Waimea, island of Kaua'i

July 2: (1) Viet Nam war hero Jerry Coffee says again as he has said many times: "Native Hawaiians Are Not A Tribe." and making them a tribe would ensure the death of aloha; (2) and (3) News reports about the Department of Interior hearings on Kaua'i -- new faces but same old story, nearly all oppose the DOI concept.

July 3: (1) Kauaians voice strong opposition to federal recognition; (2) Hawaii isle echoes anger against feds; (3) Meeting on Native Hawaiian recognition draws hundreds of testifiers in Keaukaha. "In the heart of Keaukaha, one of the most Hawaiian communities on one of the most Hawaiian of the islands, speakers were polite but firm: They will create their own government, thank you very much."

July 4: 2 news reports: Testifiers sound off on sovereignty at Waimea, Kona meetings

July 6: At Department of Interior hearing in Hana about creating a Hawaiian tribe: Singing lightens another fiery hearing

July 8: West Maui residents out in force against federal recognition

July 9: (1) and (2) At Kahului Maui residents once again "echoed the staunch opposition heard around the islands against possible federal recognition."; (3) Ian Lind, retired newspaper reporter and widely-read blogger, says the series of 15 hearings have set up a political train wreck. Independence activists, with religious zealotry refusing to acknowledge facts, are telling U.S. officials to get out. That might stop efforts to create something like an Indian tribe, which could be the only way to protect racial entitlement programs; (4) Online comment on Lind's article by Ken Conklin

July 11: Honolulu Star-Advertiser editorial notes that testimony in 15 public hearings by Department of Interior was overwhelmingly opposed to the proposed rule-making process to create a Hawaiian tribe and give it federal recognition. Editorial says all options should be explored; ethnic Hawaiians need more education on their legal options; and there should be an election for ethnic Hawaiians (only!) to make a choice before the feds do anything [but of course that's exactly the process OHA and the Kana'iolowalu registry are currently pursuing].

July 12: Weekly Saturday newspaper column in Hawaiian language; Synopsis: The testimonies shared at the Native Hawaiian Recognition meetings truly proved that the Native Hawaiian Roll Commission, Kana'iolowalu, is not working for what the people want.

July 13: Lengthy news report says "Consensus would end U.S. effort; Feedback remains firmly against a federal process, but a growing number of advocates are emerging"

July 15: (1) Letter to editor warns that failure to get federal recognition for Hawaiian tribe could spell doom for racial entitlement programs; (2) Online poll by Honolulu Star-Advertiser: "Should the U.S. Department of Interior keep open the process for federal recognition of Native Hawaiians?" 67% said NO.

July 19: Letter to editor on Kaua'i says the Reinstated Hawaiian Government is already in charge so no interference is needed from the U.S. Department of Interior, and when the Hawaiian flag goes up, non-ethnic-Hawaiians will have 6 months to either sell their property or have it confiscated.

July 20: (1) Lengthy commentary by newspaper's paid commentator Richard Borreca says the main issue in the Department of Interior hearings is how can the U.S. help Native hawaiians get back control of the ceded lands which the U.S. seized from them as part of the annexation of 1898, followed by online comment by Ken Conklin telling the history of the ceded lands and describing as a scurrilous lie Borreca's assertion that the U.S. seized the ceded lands;
Three lengthy guest commentaries in the Honolulu newspaper: (2) Law professor Williamson Chang international law says Hawaii continues to be an independent nation, so U.S. should stay out and Hawaiian values should prevail; (3) A group of independence activists echoes Chang; (4) OHA chair Colette Machado says federal recognition is necessary to protect racial entitlement programs, and the issue of international law can be dealt with later.

July 22: Letter to editor: Consensus among Hawaiians unlikely; Two keys to the reinstatement of the Nation of Hawaii: the repeal of the 1898 Joint Resolution of Annexation and the involvement of the United Nations.

July 23: Letter to editor: In 1998, [Judge] King [an ethnic Hawaiian] wrote in The Honolulu Advertiser that the apology resolution was "essentially a cynical action by an uninterested Congress, equivalent to apologizing to George III for the American Revolution." King added: "The mischief caused by this ill-considered resolution, based in large part on the flawed Blount Report, will plague us for many more years."

July 25: OHA announces it is stretching out its schedule for nation-building by 6 months to allow more time to educate the public. There is some talk that the Kana'iolowalu racial registry might be reopened for additional signups.

July 26: Honolulu Star-Advertiser mini-editorial says the 6-month stretch-out of OHA's timetable for nation-building is a good thing, and perhaps should be extended to 2 years to allow plenty of time for educating the public.

July 27: Department of Interior held a public hearing in LAS VEGAS regarding its proposal to change the rules in order to create a Hawaiian tribe and give it federal recognition.

END OF INDEX OF NEWS REPORTS AND COMMENTARIES STARTING JULY 1, 2014 AND CONTINUING (including efforts to create a state-recognized tribe or get federal recognition through administrative rule changes). History of the Hawaiian Government Reorganization bill in the 113th Congress starting July 1, 2014 and continuing (including efforts to create a state-recognized tribe or get federal recognition through administrative rule changes). Series of 15 public hearings by U.S. Department of Interior on 6 islands wraps up with overwhelming opposition to DOI concept of using administrative rule-making to create a hawaiian tribe and give it federal recognition. DOI hearings at 4 locations on mainland take place late July and early August. OHA stretches its nationbuilding timetable to run 6 extra months for educating the public, until July 2015.
For full text of each item above go to
http://www.angelfire.com/big09/AkakaHistStartJuly012014.html


================

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