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History of the Hawaiian Government Reorganization bill in the 113th Congress (January 2013 through December 2014), including efforts to create a state-recognized tribe and assemble a racial registry for a membership roll.


(c) Copyright 2013 - 2014 Kenneth R. Conklin, Ph.D. All rights reserved

On this page is the history of the Hawaiian Government Reorganization bill (formerly known as the Hawaiian Recognition bill; always known informally as the Akaka bill) during the 113th Congress (January 1, 2013 to December 31, 2014).

The history includes a collection of all significant news reports, editorials, commentaries, letters to editor, cartoons, excerpts from the Congressional Record, etc.

The index for the entire 2 years of the 113th Congress is shown below, in chronological order, subdivided into several time periods as events unfold. Full text of each news report, commentary, etc. is provided on the appropriate subpage.

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QUICK REVIEW, AND LINKS, FOR THE HISTORY FROM 2000 THROUGH 2010

For a thorough history of the Native Hawaiian Recognition bill from its birth in February 2000 through 2002 and beyond, focusing on the pattern of stealth and deception in creating the bill and trying to pass it, see:
http://www.angelfire.com/hi2/hawaiiansovereignty/Akakahistory.html

For the complete history of the Akaka bill in the 108th Congress alone (2003-2004), including all versions of the bill's text, and news coverage of political activity related to it (a total of perhaps 200 pages plus links to additional subpages), see:
http://www.angelfire.com/hi2/hawaiiansovereignty/AkakaHist108thCong.html

For a short history focusing on the stealth tactics during the 108th Congress, see:
http://www.angelfire.com/hi2/hawaiiansovereignty/AkakaStealth20032004.html

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The history for the 109th Congress included pleasant surprises in the House of Representatives. The bill stayed bottled up in the committee which had jurisdiction (Resources) and never even came to a vote in that committee. However, the Judiciary Committee took notice that the bill was threatening to come to the floor in the Senate, and did not want to see a repeat of House stealth maneuvers from previous years. Therefore the House Judiciary Subcommittee on the Constitution held a hearing where opponents of the bill were actually allowed to testify along with supporters of the bill -- the first time any opponents have ever been allowed to testify in any hearing in Washington in either the House or the Senate. As a result of that hearing a group of 21 House members wrote a letter to Speaker Hastert demanding that the bill be killed. (even though it had never yet had a hearing in the Resources committee).

The history for the 109th Congress (2005-2006) was tumultuous in the Senate and in the media. Several Senators blocked the bill by placing holds on it. An attempt to bring the bill to the Senate floor in summer 2005 was blocked by God (Hurricane Katrina). In June 2006 there were more than 4 hours of debate on the Senate floor during a two day period leading up to a recorded vote on a cloture motion (a motion to overcome holds on the bill, cut off debate, and bring the bill to a vote). A cloture motion requires 60 votes. There were only 56 votes in favor, including several Republicans who strongly oppose the bill but had made an agreement in late 2004 to support cloture (although they would then be free to vote against the bill itself, and in fact had publicly announced their opposition). Following the failure of cloture in June 2006, the bill remained dormant through the end of the year. Dozens of nationally-known political commentators wrote articles strongly opposing the bill, and major newspapers published editorials and news reports (including a New York Times editorial in favor of the bill). Website coverage for the 109th Congress includes over 2,000 pages of news reports, commentaries, transcripts of the Senate floor debate from the Congressional Record, etc. An 80-page index lists all items in chronological order and provides links to webpages which provide full text of all items for each segment of time. See:
http://www.angelfire.com/hi2/hawaiiansovereignty/AkakaHist109thCong.html

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The 110th Congress ran from January 1, 2007 through December 31, 2008 under Democrat control. The U.S. House Committee on Resources passed Akaka bill unamended May 2, 2007. The U.S. Senate Indian Affairs Committee held a hearing on the Akaka bill May 3, 2007 and passed it unamended on May 10, 2007. In October 2007 the Akaka bill was scheduled for floor action in the House. On October 22, 2007 President Bush issued a strongly worded statement opposing the Akaka bill and pledging he would veto it if it reached his desk. Nevertheless, the House held a floor debate on the bill on October 24, and passed the bill by a vote of 261-153 after a failed attempt to amend it and/or send it back to the Resources committee. Every Democrat voted in favor. Transcript of the floor debate, and record of the YEAs and NAYs, is provided. In Honolulu, the Hawaii Advisory Committee to the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights held extensive hearings with testimony on several islands, in the face of a strong and vitriolic propaganda campaign in the media against the committee taking up the issue (the committee in previous years had been stacked in favor of Hawaiian sovereignty, but its membership now was more evenly divided and there were fears it might oppose the bill). On November 15, 2007 the committee voted 8-6 not to make any recommendation to the national commission. Throughout 2008 there were many news reports, letters, and commentary on all sides of the issue, but no further action. The Senate Democrat leadership never tried to bring the bill to the floor because the Republicans made it clear they would filibuster. During the last half of 2008 economic issues, and the election, took priority, and the bill died without ever being brought to the Senate floor. A lengthy index of all significant news reports, letters, cartoons, and commentaries provides links to the full text of every indexed item, broken into several time periods. The index is at:
http://www.angelfire.com/planet/bigfiles40/AkakaHist110thCong.html

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The 111th Congress ran from January 1, 2009 through December 31, 2010 under Democrat control. The Democrats had a huge majority in the House, and for most of the two years the Democrats also had a filibuster-proof supermajority in the Senate; and a President who had promised to sign the bill when it passed. Nevertheless, civil rights activists in Hawaii and Republicans in the Senate, stopped the bill. A major factor in the death of the Akaka bill was a combination of overreaching by Hawaiian zealots who insisted on trying to ram through the most dangerous version of the bill ever, and incompetence by Senators Inouye and Akaka who tried sneaky maneuvers behind the scenes and then failed to act promptly to enact a so-called compromise version.

During the two year period there were five major different versions of the Akaka bill. Versions 1,2,3 had been previously introduced in Congress during various years from 2000 to 2008. Version #4 was the most dangerous, and was introduced in the House committee barely days before the committee hearing, and drew strong objections from Hawaii's Governor and Attorney General. The committee forced Rep. Abercrombie to withdraw version #4 and passed version #3 on which it had held a hearing with public testimony. But Congressman Abercrombie later went to the House floor, substituted version #4 in place of #3, and was successful in ramming #4 through to passage on the House floor. Version #5 was a compromise with Governor Lingle in an attempt to get some Republican votes in the Senate, but version #5 was not formally introduced until mid-November 2010 and died in the lame duck session a couple days before Christmas without without any committee hearing or floor action.

Here are more details. Three matched pairs (companion bills with identical content) of the Akaka bill were introduced in early 2009. Their dates of introduction and bill numbers are: February 4, 2009, S.381 and H.R.862; March 25, 2009: S.708 and H.R.1711; May 7, 2009: S.1011 and H.R.2314. Hearing on H.R.2314 on June 11, 2009 (Kamehameha Day) before U.S. House Committee on Natural Resources (video and transcripts available). Markup set for July 9 was postponed at last minute because Republican minority ranking member Doc Hastings demanded to know Dept. of Justice and Obama administration's views on the bill, and perhaps because of OHA and Native Hawaiian Bar Association objections to restrictions on the powers of the Akaka tribe. Hearing on S.1011 on August 6 in U.S. Senate Committee on Indian Affairs; Webcast, written statements by invited witnesses, and news reports, are provided. U.S. Commission on Civil Rights letter to Congressional leaders once again blasts Akaka bill. Zogby poll results released Dec. 15 show strong opposition to bill. Major amendments planned to be rammed through House and Senate committee markups Dec 16 and 17 were strongly opposed by Hawaii Governor and Attorney General. House committee passes unamended (original) H.R.2314 Dec. 16. Senate committee passes heavily amended more dangerous version Dec. 17. Jan 28, 2010 OHA and Hawaii Attorney General propose amendments to the Senate amended bill. At least one Republican Senator placed a hold on the bill. Feb. 23 2010 Akaka bill most dangerous version #4 was substituted on the House floor to become HR2314, and passed the House that same day by vote of 245-164. March 23 Governor Lingle letter to all 100 Senators opposes current version of the bill; Huge White House briefing in June for Akaka bill lobbyists confirms Obama will sign the bill when Senate passes it. Compromise reached to amend bill so Lingle will support it. Compromise bill formally introduced November 15, but might be only a decoy. 4 Senators publicly deplore Inouye stealth maneuver to attach Akaka bill to must-pass omnibus spending bill as part of continuing resolution to keep government running. In the lame duck session, December 2010, the Akaka bill itself was never considered by the Senate and never included inside any other bill. But a trillion dollar omnibus spending bill containing 6000 earmarks included an earmark calling on the Department of Interior to do a study of how to create a Native Hawaiian Indian tribe. That spending bill was withdrawn from the Senate by Majority Leader Harry Reid when he figured out there were not enough votes to pass it, and so the Akaka bill died.

The index for the 111th Congress, summarized in the above three paragraphs, is at
http://www.angelfire.com/big09a/AkakaHist111thCong.html

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The 112th Congress (January 2011 to December 2012) was controlled by Democrats in the Senate and by Republicans in the House. The Akaka bill was introduced in the House Committee on Natural Resources, but died in committee without even a hearing. In the Senate the first version introduced in the Indian Affairs Committee was passed by the committee but went nowhere, although Senator Inouye made two stealth maneuvers in October 2011 and September 2012, inserting a short paragraph deep inside the Dept of Interior appropriations bill to place the State of Hawaii Act 195 tribe on the list of federally recognized tribes; but Republicans blocked it. A second version of the Akaka bill that was extraordinarily powerful and dangerous passed the Committee on Indian Affairs in one minute on September 13, 2012. On December 17 Senator Inouye died following several days of hospitalization under intensive care for respiratory problems; and on that same day Senator Akaka had a favorable committee report sent to the Senate for the substitute new version of the bill and it was placed on the Senate calendar under general orders. On December 20 Senator Akaka (retiring in a few more days) made his farewell speech and asked his colleagues to pass the Akaka bill in honor of Senator Inouye. There was no further action, and the 112th Congress came to an end on New Years Day with rushed passage of the "fiscal cliff" bill. For the chronological index to published news reports and commentaries for 2011-2012, with links to subpages containing full text of all items, see
http://www.angelfire.com/big09/AkakaHist112thCong.html


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NOW BEGINS THE HISTORY OF THE AKAKA BILL IN THE 113TH CONGRESS, JANUARY 2013 THROUGH DECEMBER 2014.

THIS IS AN INDEX OF ALL SIGNIFICANT NEWS REPORTS AND COMMENTARIES DURING THE 113TH CONGRESS, IN CHRONOLOGICAL ORDER, DIVIDED INTO SEGMENTS OF TIME. FULL TEXT OF EACH ITEM IS PROVIDED IN THE SUBPAGE RELATED TO THAT SEGMENT.

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INDEX OF NEWS REPORTS AND COMMENTARIES FROM JANUARY 1, 2013 THROUGH MAY 31, 2013. Hawaii Sens & Reps confirm their zealotry. OHA resolution in state legislature commemorates 20th anniversary of apology resolution and Conklin submits satirical counter-resolution calling for its repeal; OHA lobbyist in Washington lists priorities as Akaka bill and protection of Hawaiian racial entitlements. Bill passes state legislature allowing all 108,000 signatures on defunct Kau Inoa racial registry during more than 7 years to be added to the 9300 gathered after a full year for the new Kana'iolowalu racial registry without permission from signers.
For full text of each item below go to
http://www.angelfire.com/big09/AkakaHistStartJan012013.html

January 6, 2012: The Sunday Honolulu Star-Advertiser published half-page statements written by each of Hawaii's two U.S. Senators and two U.S. House representatives, in which they described their intentions for the 113th Congress and their committee assignments. Senator Schatz and Representative Hanabusa devoted parts of their statements to their intentions regarding the Akaka bill -- the relevant excerpts are provided. Senator Hirono and Representative Gabbard did not mention the Akaka bill, but their support for it is clear from past performance and campaign pledges.

Jan 9: "Hirono, Schatz renew quest for Native Hawaiian measure" Honolulu newspaper reports the Hawaii Congressional delegation will be meeting with the ethnic Hawaiian establishment to get their marching orders.

Jan 10: Hawaii Free Press provides a YouTube video and transcript of Ben Cayetano (Governor, 1994-2002) speaking on January 9 to a Honolulu business luncheon, expressing his opposition to the Akaka bill. See also his 2002 Statehood Day proclamation endorsing unity and equality.

Jan 21: An event was held on the grounds of Iolani Palace yesterday to commemorate the 120th anniversary of the Hawaiian revolution that overthrew the monarchy on January 17, 1893. The event featured ex-Governor John Waihe'e and was sponsored by the Kana'iolowalu racial registry, which got some people to sign up.

Jan 22: 3 articles describe the roles Hawaii's Senators and Congresswomen will play in the Democrat Party and in committees related to the Akaka bill. Freshman Congresswoman Tulsi Gabbard will be a Vice-Chair of the national Democrat Party; Colleen Hanabusa will be ranking member (top Democrat) on the House subcommittee which has authority over the Akaka bill; Senator Brian Schatz will be on the Indian Affairs Committee.

February 1, 2013: OHA monthly newspaper publishes interview with Kawika Riley, OHA's chief lobbyist in Washington regarding the Akaka bill and other priorities.

February 11: OHA introduced a resolution in the state legislature to commemorate the 20th anniversary of the U.S. apology resolution; Ken Conklin testimony offers a satirical legislative resolution calling for repeal of the U.S. apology resolution because it is filled with historical falsehoods and has been used to justify racial entitlement programs and the Akaka bill.

February 12: OHA's chief lobbyist in Washington, Kawika Riley, says Congress has a federal trust obligation to Native Hawaiians and should not cut the budget by abandoning Native Hawaiian racial entitlements in healthcare and education.

March 4, 2013: Hawaii's two Senators and two Representatives meet with each other in Washington to discuss their plans for legislation.

March 7: Congress passed a revised and reauthorized version of the Violence Against Women Act, to protect Indian women living on reservations. This new version is controversial because it gives Indian tribes jurisdiction over non-Indians accused of violent crimes against women on Indian reservations. Doc Hastings, Chairman of the House Natural Resources Committee which would have jurisdiction over the Akaka bill in the 113th Congress, published some comments about VAWA.

March 13: OHA presents written testimony on a resolution in the state legislature that would put the state on record as recognizing the continuing existence of an independent nation of Hawaii whose descendants are lawfully living in Hawaii. OHA says it supports the right of ethnic Hawaiians to choose for themselves whether to have a state-recognized tribe (Act 195), a federally recognized tribe (Akaka bill), or an internationally recognized nation.

March 18: Colleen Hanabusa (D, HI), only in her second term in Congress, has been chosen as ranking member (head of the Democrats) on the House Subcommittee on Indian and Alaska Native Affairs. In an interview with Indian Country Today, she demonstrated some misperceptions or ignorance about Carcieri, and the Indian Reorganization Act; and she reaffirms her intention to push for the Akaka bill [but has not yet introduced it in the 113th Congress].

March 19: The House Subcommittee on Indian and Alaska Native Affairs held an oversight hearing on "Authorization, standards, and procedures for whether, how, and when Indian tribes should be newly recognized by the federal government: Perspective of the Department of the Interior." The hearing comes at a time when there are rumors of a backroom deal whereby President Obama might issue an executive order to give federal recognition to the Akaka tribe. Kevin K. Washburn, Assistant Secretary of Indian Affairs, U.S. Department of the Interior gave written testimony which includes a list of the 7 mandatory criteria for recognition. He said that since the process was established in 1978 the Department has federally recognized 17 Indian tribes and denied 34 groups. Since 2009 there has been one final determination granting recognition and six final determinations denying recognition.

April 2, 2013: According to the OHA monthly newspaper for April, Former U.S. Sen. Daniel Akaka is confident Native Hawaiians will receive the federal recognition they deserve and views the Kana'iolowalu registration campaign as a necessary step. However, the racial registry has gotten only 9300 signups since July 2012, far short of the campaign's yearlong goal of 200,000; and they have extended the signup period to January 19, 2014 in hopes of meeting their goal.

April 11: Keli'i Akina, Ph.D., newly inaugurated President of the Grassroot Institute of Hawaii, publishes article entitled "Hawaiians Give Vote of No Confidence to Sovereign Hawaiian Nation." After nearly a year, the Native Roll Commission has signed up only 9300 ethnic Hawaiians for the racial registry Kana'iolowalu, out of the 527,000 ethnic Hawaiians identified in Census 2010.

April 24: At a hearing in the Senate Indian Affairs Committee, Hawaii Senator Brian Schatz thanked Kevin Washburn, Assistant Secretary for Indian Affairs at the Department of the Interior, for supporting retired Sen. Daniel Akaka's bill that achieves parity for Native Hawaiians.

April 29: OHA, Kamehameha Schools, Department of Hawaiian Homelands, and other race-based programs are spending far less money lobbying in Washington than in recent years, partly because of Congressional gridlock and partly because they are using Hawaii government employees and Hawaiian students in Washington-area colleges to do the lobbying at low cost and in ways that are less visible to public scrutiny.

May 12: A bill that passed the Hawaii legislature and awaits the Governor's signature would allow the Kana'iolowalu racial registry to add the 108,000 signatures from the defunct Kau Inoa registry onto the extremely low number 9300 signatures on the new registry.

END OF INDEX OF NEWS REPORTS AND COMMENTARIES FROM JANUARY 1, 2013 THROUGH MAY 31, 2013. Hawaii Sens & Reps confirm their zealotry. OHA resolution in state legislature commemorates 20th anniversary of apology resolution and Conklin submits satirical counter-resolution calling for its repeal; OHA lobbyist in Washington lists priorities as Akaka bill and protection of Hawaiian racial entitlements. Bill passes state legislature allowing all 108,000 signatures on defunct Kau Inoa racial registry during more than 7 years to be added to the 9300 gathered after a full year for the new Kana'iolowalu racial registry without permission from signers.
For full text of each item above go to
http://www.angelfire.com/big09/AkakaHistStartJan012013.html


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INDEX OF NEWS REPORTS AND COMMENTARIES FROM JUNE 1, 2013 to December 31, 2013. History of the Hawaiian Government Reorganization bill in the 113th Congress from June 1, 2013 and continuing. Hawaii and Alaska delegations meet to solidify support for Akaka bill. Keli'i Akina, President of Grassroot Institute, gives major speech opposing Akaka bill and racial registry and affirming patriotism to America. June 11 (Kamehameha Day holiday in Hawaii) U.S. Senator Schatz gives speech on Senate floor calling for federal recognition of Akaka tribe [no bill introduced yet, but rumors of activity in executive branch], and is supported by Senators Cantwell, Begich, Murkowski, and Franken -- all 5 are members of the Indian Affairs committee. Point by point rebuttal by Conklin. New state law effective July 1 allows the Kanaiolowalu racial registry to automatically add all the names of all the people whose native ancestry has previously been verified by other institutions. Published news reports about, and editorials favoring, efforts to get federal recognition for Akaka tribe through changes in bureaucratic procedures under 25CFR83 or Presidential executive order. 4 of 8 Commissioners of U.S. Commission on Civil Rights then wrote letter to President Obama opposing concept of the Akaka tribe and abuse of executive authority. OHA trustee Oswald Stender says $10 Million already spent [during 9 years] to recruit 120,000 signups for racial registry (out of 529,000 possible) and no more money should be spent. OHA trustees make final payment to close the racial registry and certify a membership roll. Only 30,000 people signed up, while 71,000 had their names automatically transferred by bureaucrats from earlier racial registries.
For full text of each item below go to
http://www.angelfire.com/big09/AkakaHistStartJune012013.html

June 1, 2013: The OHA monthly newspaper reports that OHA sponsored a summit meeting among independence activists, supporters of the federal recognition, and organizers of the Kana'iolowalu racial registry, at University of Hawaii, to share ideas about how to move forward.

June 2: The Conservative Forum for Hawaii held a public discussion about the Akaka bill and the Hawaii Act 195 (2011) racial registry, at the Naniloa Hotel in Hilo. Grassroot Institute president emeritus Dick Rowland, and current president Keli'i Akina, were the speakers. (news report June 4; hour-long video available)

June 4: A consortium of Native Alaskan tribes, Native American tribes, and ethnic Hawaiians seeking federal recognition held a meeting with lawmakers in Washington DC. to discuss how to cooperate in getting recognition for the Akaka tribe and how to ensure continued government funding for existing and future race-based programs. (news report June 6)

June 11, 2013 is Kamehameha Day, a holiday in the State of Hawaii. (1)Senator Brian Schatz (D,HI) gives his maiden speech on Senate floor calling for federal recognition of Akaka tribe (although no bill has yet been introduced); (2) Schatz press release includes supportive comments from Senators Maria Cantwell (D,WA and chair of Indian Affairs Committee), Mark Begich (D,AK), Lisa Murkowski (R,AK), and Al Franken (D,MN) -- all 5 are members of the Indian Affairs committee.; (3) Hawaii TV news report about the speech includes video

June 12: Indian Country Today publishes photos and story about the celebration of Kamehameha Day, including secessionist sentiments.

June 13: Online newspaper publishes a condensed version of a webpage by Ken Conklin containing detailed rebuttals to 23 points in Senator Schatz' speech. The full webpage rebuttal is at
http://tinyurl.com/m3azruz

July 1: OHA monthly newspaper notifies ethnic Hawaiians that a new Hawaii law takes effect today automatically adding all the (108,000) names from the defunct Kau Inoa racial registry (over 7 years and millions of dollars) to the new Kana'iolowalu racial registry (languishing at only 9300 names after its first year).

July 4: Hawaiian independence activist Lela Hubbard urges ethnic Hawaiians NOT to put their names on the racial registry Kana'iolowalu. She says recent legislation forces "Hawaiians who have registered in any Office of Hawaiian Affairs registry, Kamehameha Schools database, Kau Inoa, etc. are now forced members of Kanaiolowalu, the Native Hawaiian roll" violating their right to freedom of association.

July 6: Numerous newspapers report that a new state law allows the ethnic Hawaiian racial registry Kana'iolowalu to automatically include all the names of all the people whose Hawaiian native ancestry has been verified by other institutions including DHHL, Kamehameha Schools, OHA, the state Department of Health, Kau Inoa, etc.

July 15: "The Trouble with the Kana'iolowalu Racial Registry" published essay by Ken Conklin

July 18: PBS-Hawaii live broadcast of a 60 minute panel discussion about ethnic Hawaiian self-governance, focusing on the Kana'iolowalu racial registry. All four panelists are sovereignty activists. The video recording was then placed on YouTube.

July 23: Hawaii's congressional delegation met with President Obama today at the White House. They're representing the Congressional Asian Pacific American Caucus. Some of the issues they'll be discussing reportedly include federal recognition for Native Hawaiians and immigration.

July 29: Andrew Walden essay "Hanabusa: Obama Considers Creating Akaka Tribe Without Congressional Approval" Includes link to download 23-page Dept. of Interior proposed revisions to 25 CFR 83

August 1, 2013: The OHA monthly newspaper for August is pushing hard for the Kana'iolowalu racial registry, including scare tactics. "Public Notice to Native Hawaiians" warns them that if they fail to register for Kana'iolowalu, they might forfeit forever, for themselves and for their descendants, their right to participate in the tribe and to receive benefits.

Aug 6: Ken Conklin essay about various methods whereby the Akaka tribe might get federal recognition, and the kinds of jurisdictional conflicts federal recognition would cause in Hawaii as shown by actual conflicts on the mainland.

Aug 7: Popular leftwing blogger Ian Lind publishes essay in Honolulu Civil Beat online newspaper describing the Kana'iolowalu signup requirements and how there may be hidden agendas in them; concludes he can't decide whether to sign up because the process and consequences are not transparent.

Aug 12: Honolulu Star-Advertiser reports that "Hawaii's congressional delegation has asked President Obama to consider executive action"

Aug 13: Honolulu Star-Advertiser EDITORIAL says Obama can and should act to give federal recognition to Akaka tribe.

Aug 14: (1) Honolulu Star-Advertiser online reader poll "Should President Obama use his executive authority to achieve federal recognition for Native Hawaiian sovereignty?" 3,014 votes, 70% NO.; (2) Andrew Walden analyzes Star-Advertiser editorial from August 13 and cites proof that Obama cannot use the 1994 Federally Recognized Indian Tribe List Act to recognize a native Hawaiian tribe, contrary to what the editorial had said.

Aug 18: Honolulu Star-Advertiser lengthy "news report" describes the low signup for the Kana'iolowalu racial registry, the upcoming grab of all names from previous racial registries; and provides a link to fill out the signup form online.

Aug 20: Ian Lind's blog provides 2 emails from lawyers. One says all racial entitlement programs are likely to be ruled unconstitutional unless ethnic Hawaiians become a federally recognized tribe either through an act of Congress or through administrative process. Other says ethnic Hawaiians greedily pushing for complete takeover are likely to get defeated, and points out that the assertion of unrelinquished sovereignty of native Hawaiians is false because sovereignty in 1892 belonged to a citizenry and government that were multiracial.

Aug 21: ANOTHER Star-Advertiser editorial pushing the Kana'iolowalu racial registry. This one laments the slow pace of signups, and warns that the ultimate goal remains unclear and disputed.

Aug 22: Washington Times reports "Obama urged to use executive order to recognize Native Hawaiians"

Aug 29: "I have a dream" -- for Hawaii, 50 years later (Recalling Martin Luther King's speech, and how his dream applies to Hawaii in 2013). Ken Conklin provides a one-paragraph list of things Hawaii must do to implement King's dream of racial equality and justice, along with detailed footnotes explaining each component of the dream. Major components include abandoning efforts to create an Akaka tribe, and eliminating racial entitlement programs.

Aug 30: The new Secretary of the U.S. Department of Interior will be the keynote speaker at the Native Hawaiian Convention in Honolulu, signaling closer cooperation in working toward federal recognition of an Akaka tribe.

September 4, 2013: (1) Washington Times news report about Hawaiian independence acttivists opposing the effort to get the Obama administration to grant federal recognition to the Akaka tribe. They have a petition on the White House website; (2) Hawaiian sovereignty activist Trisha Kehaulani Watson created a new blog and posted her first essay on it, opposing the Kana'iolowalu racial registry and especially opposing the automatic transfer of names from other racial registries without asking registrants' permission.

Sept 5: (1) Honolulu Star-Advertiser news report that Sally Jewell, the new Secretary of Interior, gave a speech at the annual convention of the Council for Native Hawaiian Advancement. She said Obama supports federal recognition of the Akaka tribe, but it's unclear how to accomplish that through administrative processes. (2) Honolulu Civil Beat online newspaper has a very different report about Jewell's speech, including details about protocols used in greeting her.

Sept 6: Honolulu Star-Advertiser mini-editorial notes that Jewell's speech sent mixed messages about administrative recognition of Akaka tribe, and federal oversight of the Department of Hawaiian Homelands.

Sept 6: Honolulu Star-Advertiser mini-editorial notes that Jewell's speech sent mixed messages about administrative recognition of Akaka tribe, and federal oversight of the Department of Hawaiian Homelands.

Sept 14: The annual convention of the National Federation of Republican Assemblies meeting in Dallas adopted a resolution opposing "the enactment of any provisions of the Akaka Bill to include the establishment of a native Hawaiians-only government, program, department or agency as well as the division of the people of Hawaii by race or ethnicity through congressional legislation, presidential order, executive branch powers, or via regulatory implementation ..."

Sept 16: 4 of the 8 members of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights jointly wrote a strongly-worded 5-page letter to President Obama opposing any attempt to use executive action to give federal recognition to an Akaka tribe. The letter reiterated reasons for opposing the concept of the Akaka bill, expressed in several official statements by USCCR in previous years, and added objections to the new concept of using executive authority to do what Congress has refused to do for 13 years. The USCCR letter, dated September 16, 2013 on official letterhead and bearing the signatures of the 4 Commissioners, can be seen at
http://big09.angelfire.com/USCCR091613LtrOpposingAkakaExec.pdf

Sept 17: (1) The Washington Times published a news report about the USCCR letter.; (2) Roger Clegg (Center for Equal Opportunity) short news report in National Review online, entitled "A Good Message for Constitution Day"

Sept 18: (1) The Grassroot Institute of Hawaii issued a press release about the USCCR letter.; (2) Honolulu Advertiser online blogger describes the USCCR letter; (3) Michael Barone, The Washington Examiner, reports on the USCCR letter and gives brief history of efforts to pass the Akaka bill.

Sep 28: Connecticut Governor and Attorney General oppose changes in federal recognition procedures that would allow Indian groups previously rejected for recognition to get it.

October 30, 2013: The Little Shell tribe of Montana is seeking federal recognition through a bill in Congress, although it can also hope for recognition through a revised Dept of Interior process now being developed. It has been seeking recognition for 50 years.

Oct 31: The Lumbee Tribe of North Carolina is seeking recognition through a bill in Congress because language in the existing Dept. of Interior regulations does not allow administrative recognition for them.

November 1, 2013: OHA chairperson Colette Machado editorial says all paths to Hawaiian sovereignty should be pursued including Kana'iolowalu state recognized tribe, Akaka bill or Presidential executive action for federal recognition, and international action for full independent nationhood; and Hawaiians who favor one mode should not oppose those who favor other modes because all will converge like rivers to an ocean.

Nov 21: IMPORTANT E-MAIL dated October 18 is posted on a secessionist blog, sent from OHA trustee Oswald Stender to all other trustees and to commissioners of the Kana'iolowalu racial registry, urging that no more money be spent on recruiting for the registry. "When you add what was spent for Kau Inoa, OHA has spent over $10,000,000 for 120,000 registrants out of 500,000."

Nov 23: Today is the 20th anniversary of President Clinton's signing of the apology resolution which commemorated the 100th year since the 1893 overthrow of the Hawaiian kingdom. A front page article in the Honolulu Star-Advertiser noted that the federal government has not taken steps toward reconciliation with Native Hawaiians as called for in the resolution; the Akaka bill has failed in Congress; and the independence activists don't want the Akaka bill anyway, because they want secession.

Nov 26: The Heritage Foundation releases a position paper opposing S.J.Res12, which proposes an amendment to the Hawaiian Homes Commission Act of 1920. Many of the points in the position paper also apply to federal recognition for a Hawaiian tribe whether through an Akaka bill or through executive action.

Nov 27: Honolulu Star-Advertiser editorial recalls the apology resolution from 20 years ago and once again urges federal recognition for an ethnic Hawaiian tribe not yet created.

December 1, 2013: Three articles from the monthly OHA newspaper: (1) News report says OHA trustees have appropriated $600,000 as a final amount to pay for Kana'iolowalu, the racial registry, [which brings the total to $4 Million for this project] producing very low numbers of registrants, and no more will be spent; (2) A trustee column explains her decision to vote to end the project; (3) A trustee column says several major ethnic Hawaiian institutions have come together in a process to assemble the elements of an ethnic Hawaiian nation, and this process of nation-building can continue regardless whether such a nation gets political recognition from the U.S. as an Indian tribe or from the United Nations as an independent nation.

Dec 9: Trisha Kehaulani Watson article in Honolulu Civil Beat says the Kana'iolowalu racial registry process is not working and should be abandoned. Instead she favors setting up a federal commission comparable to the Native Hawaiians Study Commission from the 1980s, to review the whole situation and figure out how to accomplish restoration of a Hawaiian nation, restitution for past harms done by the U.S., and recognition of Hawaiian self-determination.

Dec. 11: Honolulu Star-Advertiser published three items about Hawaiian sovereignty: (1) News report about the annual "State of OHA" event featuring keynote speaker retired Senator Daniel Akaka and OHA chair Colette Machado telling 350 people that OHA's primary focus will be nation-building and federal recognition; (2) Guest commentary by Keoni Dudley on behalf of a group of independence activists saying now is a good time to seek sovereignty; (3) Guest commentary by Ken Conklin pointing out the racial divisiveness of federal recognition and how it would suddenly impose on Hawaii a large number of federal Indian laws whose impact would be like invasive species.

Dec 12: Honolulu Star-Advertiser online poll about Hawaiian sovereignty offered 3 choices. 56% voted against any form of sovereignty for ethnic Hawaiians; 29% voted in favor of creating an Akaka tribe; 15% voted in favor of secession (independent nationhood for Hawaii).

Dec 15: Want a Gambling Casino in Hawaii? Get Recognition for a Hawaiian Tribe.

Dec 16: Two letters to editor in Honolulu Star-Advertiser praise the December 11 commentaries about Hawaiian sovereignty, and express worries about it.

Dec. 26: The Native Hawaiian Roll Commission has gathered 101,130 registrants as of Christmas 2013, including more than 71,000 names transferred from Kau Inoa and Operation Ohana. About 60 chose to opt out of having their names transferred. It started the effort with the goal of collecting 200,000 names by last July.

Dec. 30: In a year-end interview of both Hawaii Senators and both Hawaii Representatives, Colleen Hanabusa was the only one who expressed disappointment at the lack of progress on federal recognition for a Hawaiian tribe, and for her it is the most important issue. She says an executive order is the most likely scenario.

END OF INDEX OF NEWS REPORTS AND COMMENTARIES FROM JUNE 1, 2013 to December 31, 2013. History of the Hawaiian Government Reorganization bill in the 113th Congress from June 1, 2013 and continuing. Hawaii and Alaska delegations meet to solidify support for Akaka bill. Keli'i Akina, President of Grassroot Institute, gives major speech opposing Akaka bill and racial registry and affirming patriotism to America. June 11 (Kamehameha Day holiday in Hawaii) U.S. Senator Schatz gives speech on Senate floor calling for federal recognition of Akaka tribe [no bill introduced yet, but rumors of activity in executive branch], and is supported by Senators Cantwell, Begich, Murkowski, and Franken -- all 5 are members of the Indian Affairs committee. Point by point rebuttal by Conklin. New state law effective July 1 allows the Kanaiolowalu racial registry to automatically add all the names of all the people whose native ancestry has previously been verified by other institutions. Published news reports about, and editorials favoring, efforts to get federal recognition for Akaka tribe through changes in bureaucratic procedures under 25CFR83 or Presidential executive order. 4 of 8 Commissioners of U.S. Commission on Civil Rights then wrote letter to President Obama opposing concept of the Akaka tribe and abuse of executive authority. OHA trustee Oswald Stender says $10 Million already spent [during 9 years] to recruit 120,000 signups for racial registry (out of 529,000 possible) and no more money should be spent. OHA trustees make final payment to close the racial registry and certify a membership roll. Only 30,000 people signed up, while 71,000 had their names automatically transferred by bureaucrats from earlier racial registries.
For full text of each item above go to
http://www.angelfire.com/big09/AkakaHistStartJune012013.html


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INDEX OF NEWS REPORTS AND COMMENTARIES FROM JANUARY 1, 2014 AND CONTINUING (including efforts to create a state-recognized tribe and assemble a racial registry for a membership roll). See March 7 for OHA news release and 3 important documents regarding reopening of enrollment in racial registry and timetable of steps OHA will take to facilitate ethnic nation-building throughout 2014.
For full text of each item below go to
http://www.angelfire.com/big09/AkakaHistStartJan012014.html

January 4, 2014: Investigative reporter succeeds in registering "Sanford Dole" in the Kana'iolowalu racial registry (Dole was leader of the Hawaiian revolution of 1893 that overthrew the monarchy, and served as President of the Republic of Hawaii. He had no Hawaiian native blood).

Jan 10: Ken Conklin sent letters to leaders of mainland Indian tribes, and to the Hawaii Coalition Against Legalized Gambling, to alert them to the dangers of state and/or federal recognition for a phony "Native Hawaiian" tribe. The dangers are especially bad if federal recognition comes through an administrative action or Presidential Executive Order, because then the provisions found in the Congressional Akaka bill to prohibit the Hawaiian tribe from operating gambling casinos or grabbing Indian tribe entitlements would no longer be present.

Jan 13: Grassroot Institute President Keli'i Akina spent 54 minutes interviewing OHA Trustee Oswald Stender on many topics, especially focusing on Stender's opinion that the very low enrollment in the OHA-sponsored racial registry, despite expenditure of several million dollars, shows that ethnic Hawaiians simply are not interested in building a race-based government.

Jan 21: Dan Akaka, retired chairman of the Senate Indian Affairs Committee, and Dr. Michael Chun, retired President of Kamehameha Schools, published a commentary in Indian Country Today endorsing Colleen Hanabusa in her candidacy for U.S. Senate from Hawaii because of her previous work in pushing the Akaka bill while a member of Congress and her work pushing Hawaiian racial entitlements in the Hawaii state Senate.

March 7: (1) Honolulu Star-Advertiser reported on a pep rally at OHA headquarters for an announcement that OHA is reviving the Kana'iolowalu racial registry and will allow additional people to register. So far 107,039 names are on the registry [however, according to OHA's monthly newspaper for December 2013, 87,000 of those registrants never directly signed up for Kana'iolowalu and were simply transferred from earlier racial registries without being asked for their permission]; (2) Contents of OHA press release, and Statement of Commitment on Governance, and Statement on Hawaiian Nation-Building, and Flyer showing steps and timetable for the process of rebuilding the Hawaiian nation.

March 14: OHA trustee Peter Apo issued a press release describing OHA's plan to facilitate the creation of a race-based government and then OHA will phase itself out of existence and transfer its $550 Million in assets to the new tribe. Detailed budgets for facilitating the transition are included.

March 16: The Kana'iolowalu racial registry will accept additional registrants from March 17 to May 1. There are now 120,743 names on the list as the roll commission continues to verify ancestry.

March 19: OHA trustee Peter Apo says "OHA is on the brink of putting itself out of business -- but breathing life into its successor" and "If we, all of us who share this place called Hawaii, are to free ourselves of the yoke of injustice and breaches of human dignity and become whole, the ĎAha must succeed."

March 22: One week after OHA pledged to be a neutral facilitator to help members of the racial registry figure out what path to pursue to "nationhood", OHA trustees, attorneys, and lobbyists went to Washington for a secret meeting with the Department of interior to continue pushing their concept of federal recognition for a Hawaiian Indian tribe now being built from scratch.

March 29: OHA's "New Body Politic" Will Exclude 77% of Native Hawaiians

April 1: OHA's monthly newspaper for April contains a special section about the nation-building process and the Kana'iolowalu racial registry. At 7 megabytes it includes a beautiful photo of Iolani Palace bedecked with Kingdom flags and bunting, a description of the process to be followed for the remainder of 2014, and a registration form including the affirmations.
http://www.oha.org/sites/files/KWO414_WEB.pdf

April 4: OHA press release announcing series of meetings throughout Hawaiian islands and also on mainland to recruit more ethnic Hawaiians to sign up on the racial registry.

April 11: OHA community meeting about nation-building in Keaukaha, Hawaii Island, showed most in attendance oppose OHA's plans. Full video of 1 hour 54 minutes.

April 12: Broken Trust Gang Busted: OHA Admits to Secret Meeting With US Department of Interior, just days after promising to be a neutral facilitator.

April 13: Kona newspaper summarizes OHA's efforts in nation-building, and reports on an OHA community meeting on April 11 in Waimea, Hawaii Island, where most attendees oppose OHA's plans because they favor complete secession from the U.S.

END OF INDEX OF NEWS REPORTS AND COMMENTARIES FROM JANUARY 1, 2014 AND CONTINUING (including efforts to create a state-recognized tribe and assemble a racial registry for a membership roll). See March 7 for OHA news release and 3 important documents regarding reopening of enrollment in racial registry and timetable of steps OHA will take to facilitate ethnic nation-building throughout 2014.
For full text of each item above go to
http://www.angelfire.com/big09/AkakaHistStartJan012014.html


================

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