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History of the Hawaiian Government Reorganization bill in the 112th Congress (January 2011 through December 2012). Bill introduced in both Senate and House on March 30, 2011. Passed Senate Committee on Indian Affairs by voice vote on April 7. Hawaii Republican Party passes resolution May 14 opposing Akaka bill at its annual convention. July 6 2011 Hawaii Governor Abercrombie holds a signing ceremony at Washington Place (private home of overthrown Queen Liliuokalani) for SB1520, a bill to begin the process of creating a state-recognized tribe for ethnic Hawaiians, now known as Act 195. On October 14, 2011 Inouye began a stealth maneuver in a Senate committee draft of a large appropriations bill, uncovered on October 24, defeated in House on December 16 during final markup of omnibus appropriations bill. Democrat candidates for U.S. Senate, Hirono and Case, along with leading Republican candidate Lingle, strongly support Akaka bill and campaign on it, but Republican candidate Carroll opposes it. Aug 27, 2012: Sen Akaka claims he has pledge from leader Harry Reid to bring Akaka bill to the floor this year. Sept 13, 2012: Senator Akaka introduces new version of Akaka bill, passed by committee in one minute. Sept 25: New Inouye stealth maneuver: single paragraph deep inside Dept of Interior appropriation bill. Sept 26: Senator Kyl announces he will block entire Interior Dept bill until Inouye removes the stealth paragraph. Early December: Secret memo discloses plan for President Obama to use executive order to give federal recognition as an Indian tribe to a group of Hawaiian Homestead Associations [50% blood quantum required]. Dec 12: Akaka gives farewell speech on Senate floor, acknowledging his bill will not pass this year but will be carried forward next year. Dec 17 Senator Inouye died; and newest version of Akaka bill committee report sent to Senate and bill added to Senate legislative calendar. Dec 20 Akaka gave speech on Senate floor pleading with colleagues to pass Akaka bill as tribute to Inouye.

(c) Copyright 2011 - 2012 Kenneth R. Conklin, Ph.D. All rights reserved

On this page is the history of the Hawaiian Government Reorganization bill (formerly known as the Hawaiian Recognition bill; always known informally as the Akaka bill) during the 112th Congress (January 1, 2011 to December 31, 2012).

The history includes a collection of all significant news reports, editorials, commentaries, letters to editor, cartoons, excerpts from the Congressional Record, etc.

The index for the entire 2 years of the 112th Congress is shown below, in chronological order, subdivided into several time periods as events unfold. Full text of each news report, commentary, etc. is provided on the appropriate subpage.

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QUICK REVIEW, AND LINKS, FOR THE HISTORY FROM 2000 THROUGH 2010

For a thorough history of the Native Hawaiian Recognition bill from its birth in February 2000 through 2002 and beyond, focusing on the pattern of stealth and deception in creating the bill and trying to pass it, see:
http://www.angelfire.com/hi2/hawaiiansovereignty/Akakahistory.html

For the complete history of the Akaka bill in the 108th Congress alone (2003-2004), including all versions of the bill's text, and news coverage of political activity related to it (a total of perhaps 200 pages plus links to additional subpages), see:
http://www.angelfire.com/hi2/hawaiiansovereignty/AkakaHist108thCong.html

For a short history focusing on the stealth tactics during the 108th Congress, see:
http://www.angelfire.com/hi2/hawaiiansovereignty/AkakaStealth20032004.html

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The history for the 109th Congress included pleasant surprises in the House of Representatives. The bill stayed bottled up in the committee which had jurisdiction (Resources) and never even came to a vote in that committee. However, the Judiciary Committee took notice that the bill was threatening to come to the floor in the Senate, and did not want to see a repeat of House stealth maneuvers from previous years. Therefore the House Judiciary Subcommittee on the Constitution held a hearing where opponents of the bill were actually allowed to testify along with supporters of the bill -- the first time any opponents have ever been allowed to testify in any hearing in Washington in either the House or the Senate. As a result of that hearing a group of 21 House members wrote a letter to Speaker Hastert demanding that the bill be killed. (even though it had never yet had a hearing in the Resources committee).

The history for the 109th Congress (2005-2006) was tumultuous in the Senate and in the media. Several Senators blocked the bill by placing holds on it. An attempt to bring the bill to the Senate floor in summer 2005 was blocked by God (Hurricane Katrina). In June 2006 there were more than 4 hours of debate on the Senate floor during a two day period leading up to a recorded vote on a cloture motion (a motion to overcome holds on the bill, cut off debate, and bring the bill to a vote). A cloture motion requires 60 votes. There were only 56 votes in favor, including several Republicans who strongly oppose the bill but had made an agreement in late 2004 to support cloture (although they would then be free to vote against the bill itself, and in fact had publicly announced their opposition). Following the failure of cloture in June 2006, the bill remained dormant through the end of the year. Dozens of nationally-known political commentators wrote articles strongly opposing the bill, and major newspapers published editorials and news reports (including a New York Times editorial in favor of the bill). Website coverage for the 109th Congress includes over 2,000 pages of news reports, commentaries, transcripts of the Senate floor debate from the Congressional Record, etc. An 80-page index lists all items in chronological order and provides links to webpages which provide full text of all items for each segment of time. See:
http://www.angelfire.com/hi2/hawaiiansovereignty/AkakaHist109thCong.html

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The 110th Congress ran from January 1, 2007 through December 31, 2008 under Democrat control. The U.S. House Committee on Resources passed Akaka bill unamended May 2, 2007. The U.S. Senate Indian Affairs Committee held a hearing on the Akaka bill May 3, 2007 and passed it unamended on May 10, 2007. In October 2007 the Akaka bill was scheduled for floor action in the House. On October 22, 2007 President Bush issued a strongly worded statement opposing the Akaka bill and pledging he would veto it if it reached his desk. Nevertheless, the House held a floor debate on the bill on October 24, and passed the bill by a vote of 261-153 after a failed attempt to amend it and/or send it back to the Resources committee. Every Democrat voted in favor. Transcript of the floor debate, and record of the YEAs and NAYs, is provided. In Honolulu, the Hawaii Advisory Committee to the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights held extensive hearings with testimony on several islands, in the face of a strong and vitriolic propaganda campaign in the media against the committee taking up the issue (the committee in previous years had been stacked in favor of Hawaiian sovereignty, but its membership now was more evenly divided and there were fears it might oppose the bill). On November 15, 2007 the committee voted 8-6 not to make any recommendation to the national commission. Throughout 2008 there were many news reports, letters, and commentary on all sides of the issue, but no further action. The Senate Democrat leadership never tried to bring the bill to the floor because the Republicans made it clear they would filibuster. During the last half of 2008 economic issues, and the election, took priority, and the bill died without ever being brought to the Senate floor. A lengthy index of all significant news reports, letters, cartoons, and commentaries provides links to the full text of every indexed item, broken into several time periods. The index is at:
http://www.angelfire.com/planet/bigfiles40/AkakaHist110thCong.html

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The 111th Congress ran from January 1, 2009 through December 31, 2010 under Democrat control. The Democrats had a huge majority in the House, and for most of the two years the Democrats also had a filibuster-proof supermajority in the Senate; and a President who had promised to sign the bill when it passed. Nevertheless, civil rights activists in Hawaii and Republicans in the Senate, stopped the bill. A major factor in the death of the Akaka bill was a combination of overreaching by Hawaiian zealots who insisted on trying to ram through the most dangerous version of the bill ever, and incompetence by Senators Inouye and Akaka who tried sneaky maneuvers behind the scenes and then failed to act promptly to enact a so-called compromise version.

During the two year period there were five major different versions of the Akaka bill. Versions 1,2,3 had been previously introduced in Congress during various years from 2000 to 2008. Version #4 was the most dangerous, and was introduced in the House committee barely days before the committee hearing, and drew strong objections from Hawaii's Governor and Attorney General. The committee forced Rep. Abercrombie to withdraw version #4 and passed version #3 on which it had held a hearing with public testimony. But Congressman Abercrombie later went to the House floor, substituted version #4 in place of #3, and was successful in ramming #4 through to passage on the House floor. Version #5 was a compromise with Governor Lingle in an attempt to get some Republican votes in the Senate, but version #5 was not formally introduced until mid-November 2010 and died in the lame duck session a couple days before Christmas without without any committee hearing or floor action.

Here are more details. Three matched pairs (companion bills with identical content) of the Akaka bill were introduced in early 2009. Their dates of introduction and bill numbers are: February 4, 2009, S.381 and H.R.862; March 25, 2009: S.708 and H.R.1711; May 7, 2009: S.1011 and H.R.2314. Hearing on H.R.2314 on June 11, 2009 (Kamehameha Day) before U.S. House Committee on Natural Resources (video and transcripts available). Markup set for July 9 was postponed at last minute because Republican minority ranking member Doc Hastings demanded to know Dept. of Justice and Obama administration's views on the bill, and perhaps because of OHA and Native Hawaiian Bar Association objections to restrictions on the powers of the Akaka tribe. Hearing on S.1011 on August 6 in U.S. Senate Committee on Indian Affairs; Webcast, written statements by invited witnesses, and news reports, are provided. U.S. Commission on Civil Rights letter to Congressional leaders once again blasts Akaka bill. Zogby poll results released Dec. 15 show strong opposition to bill. Major amendments planned to be rammed through House and Senate committee markups Dec 16 and 17 were strongly opposed by Hawaii Governor and Attorney General. House committee passes unamended (original) H.R.2314 Dec. 16. Senate committee passes heavily amended more dangerous version Dec. 17. Jan 28, 2010 OHA and Hawaii Attorney General propose amendments to the Senate amended bill. At least one Republican Senator placed a hold on the bill. Feb. 23 2010 Akaka bill most dangerous version #4 was substituted on the House floor to become HR2314, and passed the House that same day by vote of 245-164. March 23 Governor Lingle letter to all 100 Senators opposes current version of the bill; Huge White House briefing in June for Akaka bill lobbyists confirms Obama will sign the bill when Senate passes it. Compromise reached to amend bill so Lingle will support it. Compromise bill formally introduced November 15, but might be only a decoy. 4 Senators publicly deplore Inouye stealth maneuver to attach Akaka bill to must-pass omnibus spending bill as part of continuing resolution to keep government running. In the lame duck session, December 2010, the Akaka bill itself was never considered by the Senate and never included inside any other bill. But a trillion dollar omnibus spending bill containing 6000 earmarks included an earmark calling on the Department of Interior to do a study of how to create a Native Hawaiian Indian tribe. That spending bill was withdrawn from the Senate by Majority Leader Harry Reid when he figured out there were not enough votes to pass it, and so the Akaka bill died.

The index for the 111th Congress, summarized in the above three paragraphs, is at
http://www.angelfire.com/big09a/AkakaHist111thCong.html


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NOW BEGINS THE HISTORY OF THE AKAKA BILL IN THE 112TH CONGRESS, JANUARY 2011 THROUGH DECEMBER 2012.

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INDEX OF TRANSITIONAL ITEMS FROM NOVEMBER 2, 2010 (ELECTION DAY) UNTIL MARCH 30, 2011 (AKAKA BILL INTRODUCED IN 112TH CONGRESS). News reports and commentary anticipating the Akaka bill's introduction in the 112th Congress. How the Akaka bill died in the Senate at end of December 2010. Bills in Hawaii legislature in early 2011 would create a state-recognized tribe using language from Akaka bill. Senator Akaka announces he will not seek re-election in 2012.
Full text of the items below is available at
http://www.angelfire.com/big09/AkakaTransition111to112Cong.html

NOTE: There were many items from November and December of 2010 that are not included here, because this webpage includes only the items from that period that explicitly looked forward to 2011. But this webpage does include ALL items published after January 1, 2011. To see ALL items from September through December 2010, go to
http://www.angelfire.com/big09a/AkakaHist111Sept2010.html

Nov. 9: Comcast Cable TV News (New England) reports "A long-sought federal law allowing Native Hawaiians to form their own government stands little chance of passing Congress before the end of the year, and its approval may be even less likely after a Republican House majority takes office in January."

December 22, 2010 (1) Senator Akaka's statement on the Senate floor eulogizing the now-dead Akaka bill, rebutting some arguments against it, and promising to push it again next year; (2) Honolulu Star-Advertiser reports new leadership at Office of Hawaiian Affairs will continue the same policies, will be more aggressively active, and will continue seeking passage of Akaka bill; (3) Honolulu Star-Advertiser Associated Press writer reports that OHA plans "to start forming their own new but unrecognized government following the failure of federal legislation to do so. ... Formation of the new Hawaiian government involves signing people up for it, electing delegates and creating founding documents ... You'll still need the federal bill at some point, ... But when you go before Congress, you will already have a government in place, and you will then ask the Congress to recognize that government. That's the idea."

December 29: Honolulu Star-Advertiser columnist Dave Shapiro says stalling and secrecy caused the Akaka bill to fail. He says Akaka should abandon nationhood elements of the bill and instead try to get federal recognition of indigenous status to protect against lawsuits.

December 31, 2010
(1) Honolulu Advertiser reports results of online poll from December 30: "Now that the Akaka Bill appears to be dead, do you think efforts should continue to extend federal recognition of some sort to native Hawaiians?" Yes 39%, No 61%;
(2) OHA chair Haunani Apoliona giving up chair position delivers her final "State of OHA" speech and describes the events of November and December leading to Akaka bill fizzle and says "if Native Hawaiians are committed to self-determination, this additional hurdle should not derail our efforts or our resolve. ... The time is now for us, individually, to decide to participate or not participate in this Native Hawaiian Governance Reorganization Process. Our commitment to participate is affirmed by our ENROLLMENT" ;
(3) OHA trustee Rowena Akana monthly commentary says the Akaka bill is not dead because Obama is President and favors it, and Governor Abercrombie is buddies with House Speaker Boehner, and the Akaka bill "doesn’t have anything to do with being a Democrat or a Republican and should not be such a politically divisive issue." But then she shows her nasty divisiveness by making vicious personal attacks against Akaka bill opponent Jere Krischel and the Grassroot Institute.

January 1, 2011: On Dec. 31 defeated Republican Congressman Charles Djou gave a farewell news conference. Honolulu Star-Advertiser reported "On the Akaka Bill, Djou said he had secured commitments from enough Republicans that he believes he would have been able to push the measure through, similar to how Gov. Neil Abercrombie previously managed it through a GOP-controlled House when he was a member of Congress."

Jan 2: (1) AP news report describes finger-pointing from all sides to place blame for failure of the Akaka bill on Governor Lingle, Attorney General Mark Bennett, Senator Akaka, President Obama's departments of Interior and Justice. Interesting comments from Jade Danner, Bill Burgess, Leon Siu; (2) Grassroot Hawaii blog says even though the Akaka bill appears dead, OHA will never give up its "Akaka industry" of building racial rosters and positioning itself as leaders of a future "nation."

Jan 9: Letter to editor says the Akaka bill is dead and OHA is wasting money trying to create a tribe, which would be under the control of the U.S. Congress or State of Hawaii and therefore not truly sovereign.

Jan 13: Letter to editor supports an independent, sovereign Hawaii not based on race; therefore pleased the Akaka bill failed.

Jan 16: Honolulu Star-Advertiser editorial: "Ten years after the race toward federal recognition began, the Office of Hawaiian Affairs leaders look down and find themselves still standing on the starting line — and this following a congressional session in which a win seemed almost a slam-dunk. ... Now, OHA trustees are asking the inevitable question, "What now?""

Jan 19: Letter to the Governor and Legislature from "The Committee of Hawaiian Nationals" says "The demise of the infamous “Akaka Bill” in the U.S. Congress, leaves no more smoke-and-mirror distractions or excuses to delay just resolution for the illegal invasion, annexation and incorporation of the Hawaiian Islands into the U.S. Justice demands that the proper remedy for the injury is the reinstatement of Hawaii as a sovereign, independent nation…a FREE HAWAII."

Jan 24: (1) Hawaii Reporter publishes analysis and full text of e-mail dialog between OHA Trustee Rowena Akana and Grassroot Institute member Jere Krischel regarding the Akaka bill, which began with Akana's published diatribe noted above for December 31 in which Akana accuses Krischel of being a racist and Krischel demands an apology; (2) Hawaii Reporter investigative reporter Jim Dooley says OHA spent $3.44 Million on direct lobbying for Akaka bill, not including additional millions for travel, a D.C. office, and other costs, and identifies Washington D.C. law firms that got most of it; (3) Honolulu Civil Beat reports the State of Hawaii Office of Hawaiian Affairs says it spent 3.2 Million dollars lobbying for the failed Akaka bill, but state Senator Slom says he thinks they spent more than what they admit.

Jan 25: "The Army Times" reports that Senator Akaka is being stripped of his chairmanship of the Senate Veterans Affairs committee and will become chair of the Indian Affairs Committee. The report strongly implies Akaka's colleagues consider him no longer competent to chair a major committee.

Jan 26: 2 articles in Honolulu Star-Advertiser report Akaka's demotion out of chairing Veterans Affairs committee and into chairing Indian Affairs committee.

February 1: Peter Apo, newly elected OHA trustee, says quit crying over death of Akaka bill and focus on economic power by bringing together all the large, wealthy ethnic Hawaiian institutions. "The collective wealth of these Hawaiian institutions includes hundreds of thousands of acres of land in fee-simple title as well as billions of dollars in cash assets. Hawaiians have emerged collectively as the single wealthiest ethnic group in the history of Hawai‘i."

Feb 3: A bill in the Hawaii legislature proposes to create a state-recognized tribe, using much of the same language from the Akaka bill. Ken Conklin's article in Hawaii Reporter provides links to the bill itself, the hearing notice, and Conklin's own testimony in opposition.

Feb 4: A weekly columnist for The Maui News says now that the Akaka bill appears dead, the sovereignty activists will be relying on the U.N. Declaration on the rights of Indigenous Peoples; but that the Hawaiian activists are so fragmented they will have a hard time identifying their main positions to assert their rights under the Declaration.

Feb 7: Hawaiian independence activist Leon Siu describes the bill to create a state-recognized tribe as "Akaka Bill Lite."

Feb 11: U.S. Senator Jon Kyl, (R, AZ), who has been one of the Senate's earliest and strongest opponents of the Akaka bill, has decided to retire at the end of the 112th Congress (December 2012), but is likely to continue blocking the bill until then.

Feb 20: Austin (Texas) American-Statesman newspaper has a feature called "truth-o-meter." On this occasion it provides detailed research and analysis of Governor Rick Perry's statement in his book on Tuesday, November 2, 2010, where he said some in Congress are trying "to create a separate government for those with a drop of Native Hawaiian blood." The truth-o-meter concluded the statement is half true.

Feb 26: Letter laments Senator Akaka's appointment to chair the Indian Affairs Committee, on account of his incompetence and his support for Akaka bill.

Feb 28: TV news report that a committee in the Hawaii legislature has passed a bill to create a state-recognized Akaka tribe despite strong opposition from people who testified.

March 1, 2011: (1) Associated Press news report published in Hawaii and throughout the U.S. about state Senate committee passing a bill to create a state-recognized Akaka tribe despite opposition from those who testified; (2) Letter in OHA monthly newspaper from Seattle resident takes pride that she displayed a sign from her porch during Seattle's Martin Luther King Day parade which showed the Hawaiian flag and bore the words "Sovereignty and self-determination for Hawai‘i nei / The Akaka bill in 2011."

March 2: (1) BREAKING NEWS (Honolulu Star-Advertiser): AKAKA WILL NOT SEEK RE-ELECTION IN 2012; (2) Breaking news, Houston Chronicle and many other papers served by Associated Press: Sen. Daniel Akaka of Hawaii won't seek re-election

March 3: (1) Grassroot Institute of Hawaii press release thanks Senator Akaka for his service but reiterates opposition to the Akaka bill in Congress and in the state legislature; (2) ForHawaiiansOnly blog opposes 2 bills in state legislature which give state recognition to an Akaka tribe.; (3) The Hawaii Island Journal says "If federal government won’t pass a Native Hawaiian Recognition bill, the state may" but notes that there is opposition among ethnic Hawaiians, and it is false when supporters say there are no other federally unrecognized indigenous people, and the tribal concept which might work on the mainland probably would not work in Hawaii.

March 4: Retired Judge Paul de Silva says Hawaiians are not like Indians. "Native Hawaiians are much more integrated with many leaders in all aspects of our lives and culture. Most probably voted along with the rest for statehood. Please, we can help each other regardless of race and preserve our beautiful Hawaiian language and culture without reverting to racism and separatism."

March 6: Editorial in The Maui News is "A tribute to Sen Akaka"; its main thrust is a plea to Democrats in the Senate and House: "It is time for you to push the Akaka Bill. Its passage is the only fitting tribute to Sen. Akaka's years of service to residents of Hawaii."

March 7: Article in Hawaii Reporter, and major new webpage, call for defeat of S.66, a bill in Congress to reauthorize the Native Hawaiian Healthcare system. Many of the bill's political and historical "findings" are also in the Akaka bill, and the webpage attacking S.66 provides detailed rebuttals to them.

March 9: (1) Honolulu Star-Advertiser editorial says 2 versions of the Akaka bill in the legislature, to create a state-recognized Hawaiian tribe, are not yet ready to be supported because they are too reliant on the state and too unclear on whether civil and criminal law would apply; (2) Letter in Maui News says the legislature should take another year to improve the two bills.

March 12: (1) Letter praises Honolulu Star-Advertiser editorial of March 9 which said state version of Akaka bill needs more work, and letter proposes a ballot vote on the Akaka bill by Hawaii's people; (2) Letter rips Maui News editorial of March 6 and says it would be wrong to pass Akaka bill merely as "some sort of gold watch for his retirement" -- "especially a racist, divisive piece of garbage like the Akaka bill.

March 16: Jerry Coffee, a Viet Nam war hero, writing in "Midweek", describes several bad practical consequences if the Akaka-bill clones in the state legislature are passed. He notes that instead of providing closure for historical grievances, it would open a huge can of worms.

March 23: 2 letters in "Midweek" in response to Jerry Coffee's column of March 16: Guests" in the Hawaiian homeland should know their place and give back stolen property to the rightful owners; The Hawaiian Forgiveness Project is a group of non-ethnic-Hawaiians who meet regularly to figure out how to make things right.

Monday March 28: (1) CONGRESSWOMAN HIRONO SAYS AKAKA BILL WILL BE INTRODUCED SOMETIME THIS WEEK; (2) Article in online newspaper describes localized versions of Akaka bill for state-recognition of an Akaka tribe.

END OF INDEX OF TRANSITIONAL ITEMS FROM NOVEMBER 2, 2010 (ELECTION DAY) UNTIL MARCH 30, 2011 (AKAKA BILL INTRODUCED IN 112TH CONGRESS. News reports and commentary anticipating the Akaka bill's introduction in the 112th Congress. How the Akaka bill died in the Senate at end of December 2010. Bills in Hawaii legislature in early 2011 would create a state-recognized tribe using language from Akaka bill. Senator Akaka announces he will not seek re-election in 2012.
Full text of the items above is available at
http://www.angelfire.com/big09/AkakaTransition111to112Cong.html


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INDEX FOR History of the Hawaiian Government Reorganization bill (Akaka bill) from March 30, 2011 through June 30, 2011. March 30 Akaka bill introduced in both House and Senate; April 7 Akaka bill passes Senate Committee on Indian Affairs on voice vote. May 3 Hawaii legislature passes SB1520 to start creating a state-recognized tribe. May 14 The Hawaii Republican Party at its annual convention passed a resolution opposing the Akaka bill as violating its party platform.
Full text of the items below is available at
http://www.angelfire.com/big09/AkakaHistStartMar302011.html

March 30, 2011: (1) Newspaper print edition says Senator Akaka will introduce his bill today; (2) Newspaper breaking news online reports Akaka introduced his bill AND IT IS THE SAME VERSION WHICH GOVERNOR LINGLE AND ATTORNEY GENERAL BENNETT OBJECTED TO LAST YEAR; (3) MauiNow.com gives quotes from Senators Akaka and Inouye and gives the bill number for the identical companion bill introduced in the House by Rep. Hirono; (4) A Canadian blog article started March 29 and extended March 30 provides links to full text of the new Akaka bill available on Akaka's website, audio and text of Akaka's floor speech, and alleged bill numbers in House and Senate; (5) Associated Press published a short announcement about the Akaka bill nationwide, as illustrated by article in the local newspaper in Beaumont Texas; (6) Letter in "Midweek" Oahu shopper by OHA Administrator Clyde Namu'o replies to Jerry Coffee's column from 2 weeks previously which opposed the Akaka bill.

March 31: (1) Honolulu Star-Advertiser print edition reports "Akaka Bill lives again with new push on Hill"; (2) Star-Advertiser prints correction to yesterday's print report, which had incorrectly stated that former Governor Lingle's Attorney general Mark Bennett had been involved in private negotiations with the Obama Departmentof Justice to create the language in the Akaka bill; (3) Hawaii Free Press takes note of Governor Lingle's objections in previous years to the version of the Akaka bill just now introduced.

April 1: (1) Star-Advertiser prints correction to yesterday's report, which had incorrectly stated that Neil Abercrombie last year had "led" the House Committee on Natural Resources which hears the Akaka bill; (2) Ka Wai Ola, the OHA monthly newspaper for April, has several commentaries related to the Akaka bill, as follows: (a) OHA CEO Clyde Namu'o briefly describes Akaka bill for federal recognition and bills in the state legislature for state recognition of an Akaka tribe; (b) Lengthy news report about contents and progress of bills in the state legislature for state recognition; (c) Explanation: What is state recognition and how does it differ from federal recognition; (d) OHA trustee and vice-chairman Boyd Mossman uses his monthly column to describe the political situation in Congress related to the Akaka bill, and how state recognition might help.

April 3: Star-Advertiser editorial says the version of the Akaka bill introduced last week is very unlikely to pass, because it is the version that Governor Lingle strongly opposed; and the Hawaii delegation should replace it by the version that Governor Lingle approved in hopes of getting some Republican votes.

April 5: (1) U.S. SENATE COMMITTEE ON INDIAN AFFAIRS ANNOUNCES A BUSINESS MEETING FOR THURSDAY APRIL 7 AT WHICH THE AKAKA BILL WILL BE CONSIDERED.; (2) Professor Jon Van Dyke newspaper commentary defends the Akaka bill version now in the Senate against the editorial from 2 days previously which had urged that the "Lingle compromise" version should be the one to go forward.; (3) News report about Senate committee hearing for April 7 also mentions new Census report showing the number of Native Hawaiian businesses is increasing far more rapidly that non-native businesses.

April 6: (1) "The Washington Examiner" article by Associated Press says Senate committee will consider Akaka bill on Thursday and will "make minor amendments to the bill and possibly vote on it."; (2) News report in Honolulu Star-Advertiser about Senate committee meeting for Thursday does not mention possibility of amendments.

April 7: (1) Breaking news in Honolulu Star-Advertiser online reports Akaka bill hassed the Senate Indian Affairs Committee on a voice vote; (2) The Washington Examiner published a short Associated Press report that the Akaka bill passed the Senate Committee (no mention of any amendments).

April 8: Honolulu Star-Advertiser print edition reports Akaka bill passed the Senate Committee on Indian Affairs, and repeats several points previously made by Senator Akaka in a news release at the time the bill was introduced.

April 11: Akaka bill is not needed to help Native Hawaiians economically, as shown by a Census Bureau report that the number of Native Hawaiian owned businesses, and the income they generate, is increasing far more rapidly than businesses in general.

April 19: (1) Senator Inouye, home for the Easter recess, said in an interview that there is bipartisan support for the Akaka bill and that he is proud of having obtained about a Billion dollars over the years for racial entitlement programs.; (2) Letter to editor says the April 4 editorial was inappropriate in urging that the Lingle version of the Akaka bill should be substituted for the version actually submitted, because the two versions are nearly identical anyway.

April 22: Hawaii legislature bills to create a state-recognized Akaka tribe are still alive. One bill would recognize ethnic Hawaiians as Hawaii's only indigenous people, the other would establish a commission to produce a membership roll, and a conference committee is likely to blend the two bills together.

April 27: Lawmakers Attempt End Run Around Public to Pass Akaka Bill (State legislature guts entire contents of a completely unrelated bill and replaces it with language to create a state-recognized Akaka tribe, just a week before end of session with no time to submit testimony).

April 29-30: Hawaii state legislature conference committee agrees on final text of bill to create a state-recognized Akaka tribe. 4 news reports provided, and links to download text of the bill

May 1: OHA monthly newspaper has (1) news report on Akaka bill passing Senate Committee on Indian Affairs; (2) Trustee Boyd Mossman editorial reviewing history of Akaka bill; (3) Trustee Rowena Akana editorial reviewing history of Akaka bill, praising Senator Akaka and Loretta Tuell, chief counsel of the Indian Affairs Committee appointed by Senator Akaka, and reporting progress of state legislature bill to recognize an Akaka tribe.

May 3: Hawaii legislature passed SB1520, a bill to begin creating a state-recognized tribe, with only one out of 76 legislators voting no.

May 4: Honolulu Star-Advertiser political reporter Derrick DePledge has a blog where he wrote about the zealotry of several ethnic Hawaiian Senators who gave short speeches when SB1520 was getting voted on, saying it's payback time for the overthrow of the monarchy, including Clayton Hee (former head of OHA) who laughed that there might be lawsuits and taunted "Bring it on!"

May 4 and 5: "Hawaii Starts Creating a State-Recognized Tribe", a commentary by Ken Conklin analyzes SB1520, published in both Hawaii Reporter and Hawaii Political Info.

May 11: During the first three months of 2011, OHA spent three times as much as any private group in Hawaii lobbying Congress, and it was for the purpose of pushing the Akaka bill.

May 12: Cherokee newspaper reports passage of Akaka bill by Senate Indian Affairs committee.

May 15: HAWAII FREE PRESS REPORTS THAT THE HAWAII REPUBLICAN PARTY OVERWHELMINGLY PASSED A RESOLUTION AT ITS ANNUAL CONVENTION ON MAY 14 STRONGLY OPPOSING THE AKAKA BILL AS VIOLATING ITS PARTY PLATFORM. This was the first time the Hawaii Republican Party has ever opposed the Akaka bill during the 11 years the bill has been pending.

June 1: (1) OHA monthly newspaper news report about state legislature's passage of a bill recognizing ethnic Hawaiians as a state-recognized tribe; and (2) trustee Rowena Akana's monthly trustee column devoted to that topic.

There were no additional news reports or commentaries about the Akaka bill for the remainder of June.

END OF INDEX FOR History of the Hawaiian Government Reorganization bill (Akaka bill) from March 30, 2011 through June 30, 2011. March 30 Akaka bill introduced in both House and Senate; April 7 Akaka bill passes Senate Committee on Indian Affairs on voice vote. May 3 Hawaii legislature passes SB1520 to start creating a state-recognized tribe. May 14 The Hawaii Republican Party at its annual convention passed a resolution opposing the Akaka bill as violating its party platform.
Full text of the items above is available at
http://www.angelfire.com/big09/AkakaHistStartMar302011.html


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INDEX FOR History of the Hawaiian Government Reorganization bill (Akaka bill) from July 1, 2011 to October 23, 2011. July 6 Hawaii Governor Abercrombie holds a signing ceremony at Washington Place (private home of overthrown Queen Liliuokalani) for SB1520, a bill to begin the process of creating a state-recognized tribe for ethnic Hawaiians. The bill is now known as Act 195. John Carroll, a strong opponent of Akaka bill, announces his candidacy for U.S. Senate and will be opposed in the Republican primary election by ex-governor Linda Lingle who supports the bill.
Full text of the items below is available at
http://big09.angelfire.com/AkakaHistStartJuly1of2011.html

July 1, 2011: "The Hawaii Independent" (a secessionist online newspaper) reports that Governor Abercrombie will hold a signing ceremony on Wed. July 6 for SB1520, the bill that creates a state-recognized tribe for ethnic Hawaiians.

July 4: "The Molokai Dispatch" reports that Governor Abercrombie will hold a signing ceremony for SB1520, the bill that creates a state-recognized tribe for ethnic Hawaiians.

July 6: (1) Kaua'i newspaper reports "Hawaiian group to protest Native Hawaiian bill signing"; (2) The Guardian newspaper of London published strong protest against the signing of SB1520, written by a professor at Wesleyan University (Connecticut) who is a Hawaiian secessionist; (3) Associated Press news report before the signing of SB1520 was published in Honolulu Star-Advertiser and many other newspapers and magazines, including "The Republic"; (4) "Canada Views" publishes Senator Akaka's press release ahead of the signing of SB1520, including 4 brief "radio" comments; (5) The first news report published after the signing ceremony was by Associated Press and published in the Albany (New York) Times-Union; (6) Local Honolulu Star-Advertiser version of the AP news report replaced the earlier version; (7) Hawaii News Now (KGMB TV and KHNL TV) provides detailed news report of signing ceremony including comments from supporters and opponents of SB1520.
** NOTE: See the webpage "Hawaii begins to create a state-recognized tribe. SB1520 passed the legislature on May 3, 2011. Why did they do it? What happens now?" which includes full text of the bill, news reports from April and May, and commentary by Ken Conklin.
http://www.angelfire.com/big09/SB1520StateRecognizedTribe.html

July 7: 3 different news reports about signing of bill to establish an ethnic Hawaiian tribe: (1) Hilo newspaper points out that tribal membership does not require Hawaii or U.S. citizenship; (2) Honolulu Star-Advertiser has lots of detail about the process by which the bill passed and the process by which it will be implemented; (3) Honolulu Civil Beat (online) gives a sentimental report.

July 8: Letter to editor says there was no need for SB1520, and Malama Solomon's statement about ethnic Hawaiians never yet being equal is politically and economically false.

July 9: Online poll by Honolulu Star-Advertiser 23% Yes and 77% No to question "Will the new state law recognizing Hawaiians as the only indigenous people of the islands help advance the sovereignty Akaka Bill in Congress?"

July 11: (1) Honolulu Star-Advertiser editorial celebrates signing of Act 195 to begin creating a state-recignized tribe; (2) Letter from ethnic nationalist says "Act 195 represents a form of ethnocide and continued violation of the right to self-determination and mandates for decolonization as stipulated in the United Nations Charter (to which the U.S. is a founding party). Hawaiian nationals demand justice, not lopsided, self-serving, meaningless platitudes and schemes like Act 195."

July 12: (1) Ken Conklin, in Hawaii Reporter, describes an informational briefing in the legislature, a week after Act 195 was signed, as the first round in a divorce proceeding where the husband's assets are being explored in order to prepare for property division and alimony; (2) Frank Scott in Hawaii Reporter describes the historical inappropriateness of Act 195 and the confusion it will create; (3) Letter in Honolulu Star-Advertiser says it's false to claim that Act 195 makes ethnic Hawaiians truly equal.

July 17: (1) News report says Governor wants nominees for the Native Hawaiian Roll Commission, and describes the requirement for membership in a cultural organization as making it not racial but political; (2) Letter encourages ethnic Hawaiians to register and vote in a November 2011 election for officers of a sovereignty independence group called "Reinstated Hawaiian Government"

July 31: Commentary by Colette Machado, Chair of OHA, cites July 31, 1843 restoration of sovereignty by England to Hawaii, linking it to adoption of Act 195 and to future passage of the Akaka bill.

August 1, 2011: OHA monthly newspaper has three items related to the new state law recognizing an ethnic Hawaiian tribe and how that will help get the Akaka bill passed: (1) Short statement by OHA CEO Clyde Namu'o; (2) Lengthy news report about the signing ceremony; (3) Trustee Peter Apo's monthly editorial discusses whether the tribe will welcome ethnic Hawaiians living outside Hawaii, whether the tribe will accept people with no native blood who are descendants of Kingdom subjects, and how the tribe will get revenue if the ali'i trusts do not reorganize outside the state's jurisdiction and into the tribe.

Aug 2: (1) Letter by Dick Rowland, head of Grassroot Institute, rebuts Colette Machado's commentary of July 31 and says it's a bad idea to turn ethnic Hawaiians into wards of the state or federal government; (2) News report describes visit to Molokai by Henry Noa, head of a reinstated nation of Hawaii, who opposes the Akaka bill because Hawaiians are entitled to full sovereign independence.

Aug 13: Letter by Garry Smith in response to Colette Machado's commentary of July 31 says "Dividing up the citizens of Hawaii by race for special benefits to some is hardly something Abercrombie should be proud of."

Aug 18: During the Congressional August recess, Senator Akaka held a Senate Committee on Indian Affairs hearing on Maui to host a discussion of self-sufficiency, with tribal leaders from three other states plus several ethnic Hawaiians who are leading the push for the Akaka bill (including Robin Danner).

Aug 19: Ken Conklin article says that OHA, and the Act 195 state-recognized tribe, and any future Akaka tribe, are agents of the state and federal governments and therefore cannot keep their expenditures secret and cannot have racially restricted memberships or elections. That's because they had no prior existence and are merely agencies of the federal and state governments who create them, as opposed to genuine tribes which existed first and were then recognized.

Aug 20: Letter responds to Garry Smith letter of Aug 13 by saying the Act 195 recognition bill is a small step toward a long-delayed justice for the overthrow of the monarchy in 1893.

Aug 24: Text of Senator Akaka's speech at 10th annual convention of the Council for Native Hawaiian Advancement

Aug 25: Presidential candidate Ron Paul appoints Bruce Fein as senior legal advisor -- Fein is a strong opponent of Akaka bill (links to 4 of Fein's publications opposing it).

Aug 26: "Turtle Talk" blog finally takes note of Hawaii Act 195, nearly two months after Governor Abercrombie signed it!

September 1, 2011: OHA trustee Haunani Apoliona notes that on July 6, 1887 King Kalakaua signed the Bayonet Constitution, and on July 6, 2011 Governor Abercrombie signed SB1520 = Act 195. Apoliona also lists all the Hawaiian Civic Clubs on the mainland.

September 9: Governor Abercrombie appointed the five members of the Roll Commission to identify "qualified" ethnic Hawaiians and create a membership list for the new state-recognized tribe authorized by SB1520/Act195 -- 3 news reports supplement each other with various details.

October 5: (1) John Carroll, Republican primary election candidate for U.S. Senate to replace retiring Senator Akaka, issues press release which includes his opposition to the Akaka bill; (2) The "Lawful Hawaiian Government" (a sovereignty independence group) publishes a commentary in a Molokai newspaper opposing the implementation of Act 195 to create a state-recognized tribe.

Oct 11: Ex-governor Linda Lingle announces her candidacy for the Republican nomination for U.S. Senate, and John Carroll, who announced his candidacy a month previously, challenges her to debate the Akaka bill and the Jones Act.

Oct 19: Honolulu Civil Beat online newspaper feature article asks whether Linda Lingle, if elected to the Senate, could get the Akaka bill passed even though Dan Akaka himself was unable to get the bill passed for the 12 years the bill has been in Congress. Ken Conklin's online comment says the Akaka bill is the most dangerous piece of federal legislation ever to threaten the State of Hawaii, far outweiging all other issues; and the fact that Lingle is a Republican could make her more effective in getting the Republicans to stop blocking the bill; therefore Conklin urges people to vote for whatever Democrat is running against her.

END OF INDEX FOR History of the Hawaiian Government Reorganization bill (Akaka bill) from July 1, 2011 to October 23, 2011. July 6 Hawaii Governor Abercrombie holds a signing ceremony at Washington Place (private home of overthrown Queen Liliuokalani) for SB1520, a bill to begin the process of creating a state-recognized tribe for ethnic Hawaiians. The bill is now known as Act 195. John Carroll, a strong opponent of Akaka bill, announces his candidacy for U.S. Senate and will be opposed in the Republican primary election by ex-governor Linda Lingle who supports the bill.
Full text of the items above is available at
http://big09.angelfire.com/AkakaHistStartJuly1of2011.html


=============


INDEX FOR History of the Hawaiian Government Reorganization bill (Akaka bill) from October 24, 2011 to December 31, 2011. On October 14 Inouye began a stealth maneuver in a Senate committee draft of a large appropriations bill, uncovered on October 24 -- inserts a single sentence to add the state-recognized Act 195 tribe to list of federally recognized tribes. Stealth maneuver defeated December 16 when House Republicans forced removal of Inouye sentence during final markup of omnibus appropriations bill. Inouye and Akaka both vow to continue efforts to get federal recognition of ethnic Hawaiians by any means necessary.
Full text of the items below is available at
http://big09.angelfire.com/AkakaHistStartOct24of2011.html

Oct. 24: News report in Hawaii Reporter (online) that on October 14 Senator Inouye started a stealth maneuver in a Senate committee draft of a large appropriations bill. Full details, text of devious language inserted into appropriations bill, and links to lengthy committee document are provided.

Oct 26: (1) Hawaii Reporter guest editorial says that using backdoor methods to sneak the Akaka bill through Congress violates the need for sunshine, public discussion, and full disclosure on this highly controversial issue; (2) Honolulu Advertiser reporter writes a newspaper-owned blog about politics. The blog is not included in the printed newspaper and is read by only a small audience. Two days after the Hawaii Reporter article about the Inouye stealth tactics, the ddpledge blog briefly reported on it, but declined to post reader comments. The printed newspaper and the online version did not report the stealth maneuver, except in the obscure blog.

Oct 27: 3 days after Hawaii Reporter published a detailed report about Inouye's stealth maneuver, the Honolulu Star-Advertiser finally reported it briefly in a low-profile "newswatch" item.

Oct 28: John Carroll, candidate for the Republican nomination for U.S. Senate, published a blistering attack against his rival Linda Lingle, calling her a RINO and expressing his own pride in being a genuine Republican who opposes the Akaka bill.

Oct 30: (1) Honolulu Star-Advertiser major news report by Derek DePledge describes the new strategy of breaking Akaka bill into pieces and inserting the pieces into other bills as riders; then negotiating with Republicans to pass each others' bill riders. Article claims (falsely) that this is the way other Indian tribes have gotten federal recognition.; (2) Hawaii Free Press editor Andrew Walden article describes new Inouye stealth tactic and role of former Governor John Waihee in organizing a membership roll for the state-recognized tribe under Act 195; (3) Ken Conklin says "New Akaka Bill Stealth Strategy is Actually Old", recalls a nearly identical Inouye maneuver from 2001, and says it's too bad Inouye is sullying his legacy as he approaches the end of his career.; (4) Ken Conklin says Hawaii news media engage in propaganda by reporting falsehoods as though they are commonly accepted facts, and cites Dereck DePledge's Star-Advertiser article of October 30 as a prime example.

Oct 31: (1) "Human Events" publishes brief notice about Akaka bill stealth maneuver by Brian Darling, senior fellow for Government Studies at The Heritage Foundation; (2) Honolulu Star-Advertiser mini-editorial "Once more into the breach for Akaka Bill"

November 1, 2011: (1) Richard Borreca, long-time commentator for Honolulu Star-Advertiser, writes "Hawaiian sovereignty, one sentence at a time" starting with "With a knowing smile, Hawaii's Sen. Daniel K. Inouye leans back in his chair and says: 'As has been said since the time of Adam, there are many different ways to skin a cat.'"; (2) Honolulu Star-Advertiser online poll has only four percent of 813 respondents saying the odds are good that Congress will pass the Akaka bill.

Nov 8: Commentary in "American Spectator" about the Voting Rights Act says Hawaii is more deserving nowadays than Alabama or Mississippi of being monitored by the federal government for racial discrimination in voting; citing the 2000 Supreme Court decision in Rice v. Cayetano and the current Inouye stealth maneuver regarding the Akaka bill.

Nov 17: Ilya Shapiro, an attorney with the Cato Institute, describes the Inouye stealth maneuver and explains why Hawaii issues are important for Constitutional law affecting all of the U.S.

Nov 21: 1st Congressional District Rep. Colleen ... Hanabusa is standing with her arm around Sen. Daniel Akaka, her voice lower than usual as she speaks. "You think we going to be able to get it through the Interior?" she asks him. Hanabusa is referring to ... the controversial Akaka Bill, which would provide federal recognition to Native Hawaiians. ... the latest strategy to pass the measure came from Sen. Daniel Inouye, who inserted recognition language into a larger Department of the Interior spending bill. "I hope so," Akaka says. "It's tough." Hanabusa nods. "It is tough," she says. "Anywhere we can tack it." "It's sneaky," Akaka says with a smile. "It's not sneaky," Hanabusa replies. "It's what it takes, man. We got to get it through."

December 1, 2011: OHA monthly newspaper reports on annual convention of the Association of Hawaiian Civic Clubs, including a major panel discussion about Hawaii Act 195 to create a state-recognized tribe, and how that will facilitate the Akaka bill.

Dec. 7: Honolulu Weekly article describes tension among ethnic Hawaiians over whether to support Act 195 and Akaka bill, or whether to support total independence. But article fails to mention the option favored by most people: unity, equality, and aloha for all.

Dec 14: (1) Honolulu Star-Advertiser editorial says U.S. Supreme Court should refuse to consider a taxpayer lawsuit about racial discrimination in property tax rates, because if they hear the case and overrule the Hawaii state Supreme Court, it would take away a measure of sovereignty currently enjoyed by ethnic Hawaiians. Editorial emphasizes that the cure to the problem is to pass the Akaka bill; (2) Honolulu Star-Advertiser online poll for today: "Do you think providing state government benefits to Native Hawaiians is valid under the U.S. Constitution?" No 67%, Yes 33%.; (3) Honolulu Civil Beat blog quotes OHA chair Colette Machado: “Within the last year, OHA has started to open up alternate legislative and executive routes in coordination with Senator Daniel Akaka, Senator Daniel Inouye and the Senate Committee on Indian Affairs,” she said today at OHA’s annual investiture. “President Barack Obama is a strong partner in this effort. OHA will aggressively pursue these legislative and executive paths throughout the next year.”; (4) Ken Conklin lengthy letter to editor in Honolulu Weekly says Zogby poll shows most people oppose Akaka bill, and we should support unity, equality, and aloha for all.

Dec 16-17: 3 news reports tell how Republicans in the House, during negotiations for final language of an omnibus year-end bill to keep the government running, forced removal of the sentence providing federal recognition of the Akaka tribe which Senator Inouye had previously inserted into an Interior Department appropriations bill. Also a commentary by John Carroll, candidate for the Republican nomination for U.S. Senate, who opposes the Akaka bill.

Dec 20: Ken Conklin published article summarizes and provides links to informal polls and scientific surveys showing that a majority of Hawaii's people oppose racial entitlements and the Akaka bill.

Dec 21: Honolulu Star-Advertiser mini-editorial says Akaka bill deserves a straight up-or-down vote in Congress and should not be merely a bargaining chip in an omnibus spending bill.

Dec 23: "Indian Country Today" summarizes the news about the failure of Inouye's stealth maneuver on the Akaka bill.

Dec 27: "Indian Country Today" interviews Senator Akaka, who says "I will fight until my last day in office to secure passage of this [Akaka] bill" and expresses pride in getting the apology resolution passed by Congress in 1993 and signed by President Clinton. Akaka is also pleased that President Obama has signed the U.N. Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.

Dec 30: "Bringing Mainland Tribal Troubles to Hawaii" published article provides links to 13 news reports from around the mainland illustrating the terrible conflicts between Indian tribes vs. states and counties; such conflicts would occur in Hawaii if the Akaka bill passes Congress or if the Hawaii Act 195 tribe is given land or jurisdictional authority.

END OF INDEX FOR History of the Hawaiian Government Reorganization bill (Akaka bill) from October 24, 2011 to December 31, 2011. On October 14 Inouye began a stealth maneuver in a Senate committee draft of a large appropriations bill, uncovered on October 24 -- inserts a single sentence to add the state-recognized Act 195 tribe to list of federally recognized tribes. Stealth maneuver defeated December 16 when House Republicans forced removal of Inouye sentence during final markup of omnibus appropriations bill. Inouye and Akaka both vow to continue efforts to get federal recognition of ethnic Hawaiians by any means necessary.
Full text of the items above is available at
http://big09.angelfire.com/AkakaHistStartOct24of2011.html


=============


INDEX FOR History of the Hawaiian Government Reorganization bill (Akaka bill) from January 1, 2012 to August 2, 2012. Linda Lingle, likely Republican nominee for U.S. Senate, and Ed Case, former Congressman running for the Democrat nomination for Senate, both publicize their strong support for ethnic Hawaiian racial entitlements in general and for the Akaka bill in particular. Rep Tom Cole (R,OK), an enrolled member of an Indian tribe and cosponsor of Akaka bill, speaks at Lingle fundraisers in Hawaii. July 20: A ceremony at Liliuokalani's home kicked off a year-long process to recruit ethnic Hawaiians to sign up on a racial registry organized under Act 195 of the 2011 legislature.
Full text of the items below is available at
http://big09.angelfire.com/AkakaHistStartJan1of2012.html


January 1, 2012: State of Hawaii Office of Hawaiian Affairs monthly newspaper report on speeches made at the "State of OHA" annual meeting emphasizes OHA's continuing efforts to pass the Akaka bill and to implement state Act 195 [a local clone of the Akaka bill].

Jan 3: Senator Inouye tells constituents “I am very disappointed to report that I was compelled to give up our recognition provision at the end of the Conference [on omnibus spending bill in December 2011].” Inouye said that the Republicans who opposed the Akaka Bill would have demanded “anti-environmental” provisions that would have “set back our nation’s air and water protections for many years” in exchange for federal recognition. Inouye also said he will “continue to fight” for the Akaka Bill’s passage.

Jan 9: Honolulu Civil Beat online newspaper article says that in view of longtime Congressional inaction on the Akaka bill, OHA is hoping the Bureau of Indian Affairs will grant administrative recognition to the Hawaiian tribe; comment by Ken Conklin shows that cannot happen if BIA follows the law, because "Native Hawaiians fail to meet the requirements laid out in 25 CFR 83.7.

Jan 11: Former Governor Lingle, Republican, running for the U.S. Senate, trumpets her bipartisanship and her ability to get her fellow Republicans in the U.S. Senate to support the Akaka bill (she takes credit for getting a few Republican Senators to co-sponsor the bill in previous years).

Jan 13: John Fund, Wall Street Journal columnist, says Akaka bill is dead and notes that community activists persuaded Senate Republicans to block it despite near-unanimous support for Akaka bill by Hawaii politicians.

Jan 20: Malia Hill, of the Grassroot Institute of Hawaii, published Part 1 of a 2-part brochure describing the Akaka bill and its dangers for Hawaii's economic and social environment. Part 2 was published February 24. The two parts are consolidated for this website at February 24.

Jan 22: Major article in Honolulu Star-Advertiser describes how the Act 195 roll commission is working to reach out to enroll ethnic Hawaiians throughout America, how this effort facilitates the Akaka bill, and how OHA will eventually turn over its assets to the Act 195 tribe (including the $200 Million Kakaako land settlement being proposed in the legislature).

Jan 26: Once again, in 2010 Hawaii state and county government agencies spent far more money lobbying in Washington D.C. than private companies did, according to 2011 U.S. Senate lobbyist disclosure reports. The two biggest spenders were OHA pushing the Akaka bill, and the Honolulu rail project seeking federal funding.

February 24: Malia Hill, of the Grassroot Institute of Hawaii, published Part 2 of a 2-part brochure describing the Akaka bill and its dangers for Hawaii's economic and social environment. Part 1 was published January 20. The two parts are consolidated for this website at February 24.

April 1: OHA trustee Peter Apo uses OHA month;y newspaper to publish a summary of an article by a professor of law at the University of Guam: "International law and federal recognition of the Hawaiian nation" The article rejects the Akaka bill but favors using the United Nations process for decolonization.

April 6: Honolulu Star-Advertiser publishes a lengthy interview with former Governor John Waihee, who now heads the legislature-created commission to build a roll of members for the Native Hawaiian tribe created under Act 195. Waihee makes it very clear that this is about restoring the never-relinquished sovereignty of the nation of Hawaii, and he describes a future political entity where people with Hawaiian blood have voting rights but everybody else who wants to help can also sign up.

April 18: International Business Times lengthy article describes Akaka bill, supporters and opponents. "It is unlikely that the bill will be passed before Akaka's retirement, and it is uncertain if it will be reintroduced in his absence next year. In the event that the Akaka Bill leaves with its author, Native Hawaiian concerns will fall even further by the wayside in Washington politics."

April 28: The Maui News publishes a puff piece touting Esther Kia'aina, candidate in the Democrat primary for Hawaii 2nd Congressional district. The main plank in her platform is to push the Akaka bill, which she would be the best candidate to do, on account of her experience during 17 years as legislative assistant to Senator Akaka, and chief of staff to Congressman Ed Case and to Guam Territorial Delegate Robert Underwood. She has also worked as land asset manager for Kamehameha Schools, and chief advocate for OHA.

May 2012 monthly publications: (1) May issue of the University of Hawaii Law School student publication Asian-Pacific Law & Policy Journal has a major article by two recent graduates defending the Akaka bill and the right of Congress to grant federal recognition to a group based on genealogical descent alone, in rebuttal to an article published two years previously in the same journal. Links to download both articles are provided.; (2) Jere Krischel article lamenting how the racial separatism of the Akaka bill violates America's founding motto "E Pluribus Unum"; (3) Elaine Willman "Trends in Federal Indian Policy and Common Law" says America is now at a crisis point where major trends are converging to force a sudden major change in federal Indian policy; (4) Elaine Willman "When in the Course of Human Events it Becomes Necessary" says the racial separatism of the Akaka bill fits right in with the racial separatism of the Hispanic "Aztlan" movement and the Islamist communities using condominium law to try to operate under Islamic law.

May 8 and 15: Republican candidate for U.S. Senate, former Governor Linda Lingle, will hold fundraisers in Honolulu and Kona, focused on her support for the Akaka bill, featuring guest speaker Rep. Tom Cole (R,OK), the only enrolled member of an Indian tribe serving in Congress, who has been a co-sponsor of the Akaka bill throughout his 10 years in Congress.

May 16: Richard Rowland, President of Grassroot Institute of Hawaii, says the Akaka bill would cause poverty for Native Hawaiians, like what is found on Indian reservations.

May 19: (1) Retired General Robert Lee, Linda Lingle's campaign manager, deplores Democrat attacks on Rep. Tom Cole (R,OK) who is joining Lingle's campaign fundraisers in Hawaii as a speaker in support of Akaka bill; (2) Ed Case, former member of Congress running for the Democrat nomination for U.S. Senate, publishes a major statement describing 10 principles all focused on his strong support for Hawaiian racial entitlements in general and the Akaka bill in particular

May 20: (1) Derrick DePledge, Honolulu Star-Advertiser reporter, publishes article devoted entirely to summarizing the positions on the Akaka bill by all the Hawaii candidates for U.S. Senate; (2) Keith Rollman, campaign manager for Senate candidate John Carroll, publishes online comment to DePledge article providing entirety of what Carroll sent to DePledge including Carroll's position supporting Hawaiian racial entitlements (especially the Hawaiian Homelands), presumably to make it clear that Carroll's opposition to Akaka bill does not make him "anti-Hawaiian"; (3) DePledge posts an online entry in his newspaper blog saying that Akaka/Inouye will likely try to attach Akaka bill to a spending bill requiring only 51 votes to pass in order to avoid a cloture fight on a free-standing bill, which would require 60 votes; and DePledge provides text of Akaka's spokesman asserting that ethnic Hawaiians "remain the only federally recognized indigenous people without a government-to-government relationship with the U.S."; (4) Ken Conklin's online comment points out the doublespeak self-contradiction in what the Akaka spokesman said.

May 21: TV news report about Senate candidate Linda Lingle speaking about the Akaka bill at campaign fundraiser in Kona (Hawaii Island), accompanied by Congressman Tom Cole (R,OK) who is a cosponsor of it.

May 24: (1) Congressman Tom Cole (R,OK), at a campaign fundraiser for Linda Lingle in Honolulu on May 23, severely criticized his fellow Republicans in the House and Senate for blocking the Akaka bill.; (2) John Carroll, candidate for U.S. Senate in the Republican primary, criticizes Tom Cole and Linda Lingle, pointing out the racial divisiveness of the Akaka bill and the history of the Kingdom of Hawaii proclamation that all people are of one blood.

May 25: Ilya Shapiro, senior fellow in constitutional studies at the Cato Institute, criticizes Cole/Lingle for making personal attacks on Akaka bill opponents rather than discussing the fundamental issues.

May 27: Letter to editor (Memorial Dal weekend) says "The Hawaiian people want their sovereignty just as much as the American colonialists wanted their independence from Great Britain, but they want to achieve it in a peaceful manner."

June 1, 2012: A play sympathetic to the push for race-based Hawaiian sovereignty was produced 15 years ago and is now being performed again throughout the month of June.

June 30: Former Governor Lingle, running for U.S. Senate, issues a press release expressing joy that the U.S. Supreme Court has refused to hear the Corboy lawsuit regarding race-based property tax waivers on Hawaiian homelands leases. Lingle promises to work to pass the Akaka bill as a way to put an end to such lawsuits.

July 1, 2012: OHA trustee Peter Apo says he is sympathetic to the Hawaiian independence activists who think the Akaka bill will yield a condition of being under house arrest but free to rearrange the furniture; however, he believes the United Nations is totally impotent to restore true sovereignty.

July 13: Televised debate among 4 leading candidates for Congress for Hawaii's second district has all 4 supporting Akaka bill. One candidate is Esther Kia'aina, who works as public spokesperson for OHA and previously served as staffer for Senator Akaka, Representative Ed Case, and Guam Representative Robert Underwood. She helped push through the Apology Resolution in 1993.

July 20-21: Numerous newspaper and TV stations published news reports about Kana'iolowalu -- the process begun on July 20 whereby the Native Hawaiian Roll Commission, created under SB1520=Act195 of the 2011 legislature, will take one year to recruit ethnic Hawaiians to sign up for the racial registry.

August 1, 2012: Peter Apo, OHA trustee, has part 2 of his essay in the OHA monthly newspaper regarding what happens next with federal recognition for ethnic Hawaiians.

END OF INDEX FOR History of the Hawaiian Government Reorganization bill (Akaka bill) from January 1, 2012 to August 2, 2012. Linda Lingle, likely Republican nominee for U.S. Senate, and Ed Case, former Congressman running for the Democrat nomination for Senate, both publicize their strong support for ethnic Hawaiian racial entitlements in general and for the Akaka bill in particular. Rep Tom Cole (R,OK), an enrolled member of an Indian tribe and cosponsor of Akaka bill, speaks at Lingle fundraisers in Hawaii. July 20: A ceremony at Liliuokalani's home kicked off a year-long process to recruit ethnic Hawaiians to sign up on a racial registry organized under Act 195 of the 2011 legislature.
Full text of the items above is available at
http://big09.angelfire.com/AkakaHistStartJan1of2012.html


==================


INDEX FOR History of the Hawaiian Government Reorganization bill (Akaka bill) from August 3, 2012 through December 31, 2012. August 27: Senator Akaka claims to have a pledge from leader Harry Reid that the Akaka bill will come to the floor this year. Sept. 13, 2012: Senator Akaka introduced a new version of the Akaka bill in the Committee on Indian Affairs, which passed it immediately in about one minute despite opposition from vice-chair Sen John Barrasso and member Sen John McCain. Sept 25: New Inouye stealth maneuver: single paragraph deep inside Dept of Interior appropriation bill. Sept 26: Senator Kyl will block the Interior bill until Inouye removes the Inouye stealth paragraph. Early December: Secret memo exposed, which says President Obama will issue an executive order giving federal recognition as an Indian tribe to a group of Hawaiian Homestead Associations [50% native blood required], which would thereby take over 200,000 acres of homestead land and $600 Million of OHA assets. Dec 12: Akaka gives farewell speech on Senate floor, acknowledging his bill will not pass this year but will be carried forward next year. Dec 17 Senator Inouye died; and the committee report of the new version (Sept 13) of Akaka bill was formally sent to Senate and the bill was placed on legislative calendar. Dec 20 Akaka gave speech on Senate floor pleading with colleagues to pass Akaka bill as tribute to Inouye.
Full text of the items below is available at
http://www.angelfire.com/big09/AkakaHistStartAug3of2012.html

August 3: YouTube video, 92 minutes, of a meeting about the goals and procedures of the Native Hawaiian Roll Commission authorized under Act 195 to establish a racial registry for a future Native Hawaiian tribe. Active participants include former Governor John Waihee, who is chairman of the Commission, and Mahealani Wendt, former head of the Native Hawaiian Legal Corporation [when her surname was Kamau'u]. All participants make clear that the commitment is to independence, as shown by the affirmation of Hawaii's "unrelinquished sovereignty" in Act 195 and in the pledge signed by people who sign the new racial registry.

Aug 19: Senator Inouye turns 88 next month. He said that when his current term ends 4 years from now he plans to run again for an additional 6 year term. He also said "If it's the last thing I do, I will make sure the Akaka bill passes. I gave [Akaka] my word."

Aug 24: Kana'iolowalu racial roster public meeting set for Maui

Aug 24-25: Republican candidate for U.S. Senate John Carroll, who lost to former Governor Linda Lingle in the primary election, announces his endorsement for Democrat nominee Mazie Hirono because he doubts Lingle's decision-making and ability to govern.

Aug 27: Senator Akaka claims to have a pledge from majority leader Harry Reid that the Akaka bill will come to the Senate floor this year.

Aug 31: Data focused on Native Hawaiians from Census 2010 have important political implications for Hawaii and all of America. The implications concern the Akaka bill and/or Act 195 state-recognized tribe; and victimhood claims asserted by the Hawaiian grievance industry as a way of demanding sympathy, money, and political power. Native Hawaiians would be the largest Indian tribe in America. Their average age is 26, compared to an average age of 42 for all the rest of Hawaii's people; the age gap explains why they have lower income, and higher rates of drug abuse and incarceration.

September 1, 2012: OHA trustee Peter Apo writes "the roll commission [Act 195] is not an initiative designed to support the Akaka bill. The political anticipation is that the Akaka bill will not survive congressional Republican opposition. The roll commission signals a new political strategy toward self-determination. The roll commission is a virtual voter registration process. It anticipates a Native Hawaiian Governing Entity by identifying the citizenry to be governed."

September 4, 2012: Republican and Democrat 2012 National and State Platforms Regarding the Akaka bill and Hawaiian Racial Entitlements

Sept 11: 2 minor online news reports that the Senate Committee on Indian Affairs will gut and "markup" (replace) the Akaka bill at a September 13 business meeting. The new version will delete lengthy portions regarding membership requirements and procedures for creating the Akaka tribe, and refer such matters to the racial registry process now underway under state Act 195 (2011).

September 13-14, 2012: Senator Akaka introduced a new version of the Akaka bill in the Senate Committee on Indian Affairs, and the committee immediately passed it by voice vote in about one minute. For the first time in the 12-year history of the bill, news media reported that there were committee members who expressed opposition inside the committee during the meeting. Senator John Barrasso (R,WY), who is vice-chair of the committee, voted against the bill and said that Senator John McCain (R, AZ), absent from the meeting, also wished to be recorded as voting no. This webpage provides a link to the text of the bill, full text of news reports during the day the bill was introduced and the following day (the most insightful reports based on in-person observation of the meeting are provided first regardless of date), and Senator Akaka's news release.

Sept 16: Honolulu Star-Advertiser online poll has 74% of respondents saying the chances of passing the Akaka bill this year are poor, 19% fair, 7% good.

Sept 18: "Brief Summary of Bad Surprises in the New Akaka Bill" major article by Ken Conklin describes how the new bill authorizes casinos in Hawaii and mainland, allows Akaka tribe to take benefits from federal benefit programs at expense of mainland tribes, allows claims against public and private lands in Hawaii using Indian non-intercourse act, etc.

Sept 20: Senator Akaka opened a business meeting of the Senate Committee on Indian Affairs by reading a prepared statement in which he reviewed a history of Indian victimhood at the hands of the U.S., and a modern revival of tribal sovereignty. He ended by saying "My top legislative priority, the Native Hawaiian Government Reorganization Act, ensures parity in policy for all federally-recognized Native peoples. It means the Native Hawaiian people will have full access to the prevailing federal policy on self-determination, and finally be able to exercise their right to self-governance. It is time for the United States to give my people access to its best policies on Native peoples, not just the legacies of the worst ones."

Sept 24: Keli'i Akina, candidate for OHA trustee, says the new Akaka bill lets Congress wash its hands of racism and makes Hawaii do that dirty work.

Sept 25: (1) New Inouye stealth maneuver is uncovered -- a paragraph buried inside a proposed Department of Interior appropriations bill that would authorize the Secretary of Interior to add the Akaka tribe to the list of federally recognized tribes.; (2) Honolulu Star-Advertiser editorial supports the new Akaka bill (without describing what's in it).

Sept 26: News release from Senator Jon Kyl, a longtime staunch opponent of the Akaka bill, says Kyl will block the entire Interior Department appropriations bill (i.e., put a hold on it or filibuster it) until Inouye's stealth paragraph recognizing the Akaka tribe is removed.

Sept 30: (1) News report about Senator Inouye inserting stealth language into Department of Interior appropriations bill to give federal recognition to the Akaka tribe; (2) Guest commentary by OHA trustee Peter Apo saying ethnic Hawaiians should pull together all the enormous land and money assets they have in Native Hawaiian institutions, and pursue nationhood even if there is no federal legislation to create the Akaka tribe.

October 1, 2012: The OHA monthly newspaper contained several pages with multiple stories about Kana'iolowalu, the new racial registry being assembled under Hawaii Act 195 (2011) which dovetails with the federal Akaka bill. OHA CEO pep talk; Former Governor John Waihe's, chairman of Kana'iolowalu; a comparison among past racial registries including Operation Ohana, the OHA Hawaiian Registry, Kau Inoa; a description of initial reluctance on the mainland; a passionate appeal from Kehaulani Abad saying that the Hawaiian dream is not the American dream.

Oct 2: Short article in Civil Beat finally takes note that Inouye inserted stealth language into the Interior Dept budget bill to recognize the Akaka tribe, and Republicans immediately objected.

Oct 4: OHA trustee candidate Keli'i Akina says that Republicans, by opposing the Akaka bill, are actually embracing longstanding Democrat principles opposing racial exclusion. Thus opposition to Akaka bill should be bipartisan.

Oct 5: Senator Akaka swan-song -- his final speech as a sitting Senator to the annual convention of the Council for Native Hawaiian Advancement, putting himself in the line of succession to Robert Wilcox and Jonah Kuhio Kalaniana'ole, and touting his new version of the Akaka bill.

Oct 17: (1) Ken Conklin recommendations for Hawaii voters who oppose the Akaka bill: US Senate, US House, OHA trustees, state legislature; (2) Harry Reid, U.S. Senate majority leader, interviewed by "Indian Country Today", praises Senator Akaka and wants to help him pass the Akaka bill

Oct 22: The Association of (Native) Hawaiian Civic Clubs selected Washington D.C. as the place to hold its annual convention. But they refused to allow a reporter to cover their meetings, refused a request for interview, and commented that their growing number of (race-based) clubs on the mainland is now "colonizing" America just as America colonized Hawaii.

Oct 26: Ken Conklin, in the Kaua'i newspaper, says vote against Lingle and Djou because, as Republicans, they would work inside the Republican caucus to undermine Republican opposition to Akaka bill.

Nov 4: Keli'i Akina tells why he should be elected as OHA trustee and Cal Lee should not, including Akina's opposition to the Akaka bill and the Act 195 racially exclusionary state-recognized tribe.

Nov 6: Office of Hawaiian Affairs Beefing Up Advocacy At Federal Level by re-opening its Washington D.C. office

Nov 12: In an interview in "Indian Country Today", Senator Akaka, chairman of the Senate Committee on Indian Affairs, says his top 2 priorities for the lame duck session are a clean Carcieri fix and the Akaka bill, and he will push those as hard as he can right up until the final gavel bangs down on December 21.

Nov 28: Dr. Keli'i Akina, who ran for OHA trustee at-large and placed 3rd out of 6 candidates on November 6, wrote an article in Honolulu Civil Beat entitled "Native Hawaiian Roll Commission Is Racial Discrimination."

Nov 30: Associated Press reports that Senator Akaka has presided for the last time over a meeting of the Senate Indian Affairs Committee before his retirement. But the AP report described Akaka as the only native who has ever chaired that committee, forgetting and disrespecting Colorado Senator Ben Nighthorse Campbell.

December 1, 2012: Honolulu Star-Advertiser publishes correction to November 30 news report.

December 3, 2012 and December 5: Secret memo reveals plan for Obama to issue executive order granting federal recognition as an Indian tribe to a group of Hawaiian Homestead Associations [50% blood quantum required] who would then own 200,000 acres of homestead lands and get $600 Million in OHA assets.

Dec 3-5: 3-part series in Honolulu Civil Beat describes Senator Akaka's 36 year career in Congress. Part 1: Plenty of aloha, but not many accomplishments. Part 2 describes the history of the Akaka bill in both the House and Senate from 2000-2012, including all the various bill numbers and what became of them. Part 3: Ambassador Of Aloha Bridged Party Lines [in personal relations but not in legislative accomplishments]

Dec 5: Keli'i Akina Honolulu Star-Advertiser commentary: "An abuse of democracy may be ahead as certain Native Hawaiian groups consider plans to bypass the majority of Hawaii voters on the issue of whether the state of Hawaii should be the venue for a race-based sovereign nation."

Dec. 9: Andrew Walden describes many ways that the final version of the Akaka bill, passed on September 13 by the Senate Indian Affairs Committee, would empower the new Akaka tribe to attack all land titles in Hawaii, build casinos on the mainland as well as in Hawaii, and have special powers not available to a majority of mainland tribes.

Dec 11: The Seattle Times newspaper finally publishes a correction of the November 29 Associated Press story which had incorrectly said that Senator Akaka was the first native person to chair the Senate Committee on Indian Affairs.

Dec 12: Senator Akaka gives a 15 minute farewell speech on the floor of the U.S. Senate, in which "Akaka acknowledged that the Akaka Bill, named after him, will not pass before he leaves office, but urged colleagues to pass the measure, which would create a process toward Native Hawaiian sovereignty." A C-SPAN2 video clip of the portion of his speech in which he spoke about the Akaka bill is provided, along with a video and full text of his entire farewell speech. Akaka said "My bill has encountered many challenges, but it is pono, it is right, and it is long overdue. Although I will not be the bill's sponsor in the 113th Congress, it will forever bear my highest aspirations and heartfelt commitment to the Native Hawaiian people, the State of Hawaii, and the United States of America."

Dec 13: Honolulu Star-Advertiser front page headline story:
A 'DECENT' MAN LEAVES SENATE
After 36 years as a lawmaker, Daniel Akaka delivers a stirring farewell to Capitol Hill and Washington
And a 2-page centerfold describes his legacy.

Dec. 17: The newest version of the Akaka bill, passed by the Senate Committee on Indian Affairs on September 13, has finally had its official committee report sent to the Senate AND THE BILL HAS BEEN PLACED ON THE SENATE CALENDAR UNDER "GENERAL ORDERS." (That means the bill could be called to the floor by Majority Leader Harry Reid to be debated, if and when he chooses to do so.). See news report by Andrew Walden on December 20.

Dec 18: Senator Inouye died on December 17. The Honolulu Star-Advertiser on December 18 published lengthy articles and an editorial commemorating his life. A few sentences, excerpted here, were devoted to his work on the apology resolution of 1993 and the Akaka bill from 2000 to 2012.

Dec. 20: News report by Andrew Walden in Hawaii Free Press says Akaka bill has had its committee report sent to the Senate and has been placed on the Calendar under General Orders. News report includes link to the report.

Dec 20: News report says the racial registry Kana'iolowalu, to create a membership for the Hawaii Act 195 (2011) tribe, has gotten only 7,000 signatures at approximately the halfway point in its year-long signup campaign. But they're going to spend lots of money to get signups in the months ahead.

Dec 20-21: On December 20 Senator Akaka spoke on the Senate floor pleading with his colleagues to pass the Akaka bill as a tribute to Senator Inouye who also supported the bill. His 8-minute speech was reported in the Honolulu Star-Advertiser on Dec. 21 along with a video clip from CSPAN of his 9-minute speech. The Congressional Record from Dec. 20 became available on Dec 21; full text of Akaka's speech is provided along with a followup speech by Alaska Senator Lisa Murkowski supporting Akaka's plea.

Dec 24: Mini editorial notes that Inouye often made end-of-session stealth maneuvers to pass Akaka bill, and wouldn't it be ironic if Akaka's plea for Senate to pass Akaka bill in honor of Inouye finally gave Inouye success.

END OF INDEX FOR History of the Hawaiian Government Reorganization bill (Akaka bill) from August 3, 2012 through December 31, 2012. August 27: Senator Akaka claims to have a pledge from leader Harry Reid that the Akaka bill will come to the floor this year. Sept. 13, 2012: Senator Akaka introduced a new version of the Akaka bill in the Committee on Indian Affairs, which passed it immediately in about one minute despite opposition from vice-chair Sen John Barrasso and member Sen John McCain. Sept 25: New Inouye stealth maneuver: single paragraph deep inside Dept of Interior appropriation bill. Sept 26: Senator Kyl will block the Interior bill until Inouye removes the Inouye stealth paragraph. Early December: Secret memo exposed, which says President Obama will issue an executive order giving federal recognition as an Indian tribe to a group of Hawaiian Homestead Associations [50% native blood required], which would thereby take over 200,000 acres of homestead land and $600 Million of OHA assets. Dec 12: Akaka gives farewell speech on Senate floor, acknowledging his bill will not pass this year but will be carried forward next year. Dec 17 Senator Inouye died; and the committee report of the new version (Sept 13) of Akaka bill was formally sent to Senate and the bill was placed on legislative calendar. Dec 20 Akaka gave speech on Senate floor pleading with colleagues to pass Akaka bill as tribute to Inouye.
Full text of the items above is available at
http://www.angelfire.com/big09/AkakaHistStartAug3of2012.html


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