Site hosted by Angelfire.com: Build your free website today!
 


 

Aircraft.. Mustang ll....design by Bob Bushby. (Now Mustang Aeronautics)
C-GAIF
The Mustang ll is of all aluminum construction, undertaken over an eleven year period totaling some 4000 hours of actual shop work. The plans built aircraft was completed and flown in May of 1981 and as of June 2000 has logged some 820 hours of flight.
When displayed at our Experimental Aircraft Association Western Canada convention in Alberta in the summer of 1981 it received "Best Homebuilt" award as well as "Grand Champion" of the convention. (The builder was suitably proud!)
 

Aircraft Specifications:
Empty Weight...............................................1028 pounds
Wing Span................................................... 24' 6"
Length (Prop spinner to tailwheel..................... 19' 10"
Cockpit Interior Width..................................... 38"
Seating....(Side by Side)................................. Two
Airspeed (cruise prop)..................................... 175 MPH
Airspeed (All purpose prop).............................. 165 MPH
Stall Speed (Indicated)..................................... 67 MPH
Rate of Climb (depending on gross weight)......... 1000 to 1500 FPM
Range (with 45 minutes fuel remaining).............. 3 hrs.
Engine.(Lycoming 0-320-E2A............................ 150 HP
Fuel Consumption............................................ 7 GPH
On Board Food Service..................................... Nil
On Board Washrooms...................................... Nil
Flight Characteristics.....................(Note width of Pilots Grin)
Builder Pilot..................................................... John Veale


"Stick Time - May 8/2001"

Come with me on a little flight. A vicarious flight of fancy on the wings of C-GAIF. Lunch has been graciously packed by my wife Pat. Transportation to the airport was by MGB, top down of course, and when I arrive I am already in a wonderful state of mind. Destination? Still mulling that over...Tofino in Pacific Rim National Park perhaps, or maybe Port Hardy at the north end of Vancouver Island. I'll check the weather with Flight Service before I decide. I'm told the whole island is mine, so wanting to do an around the island tour this summer I decide to track toward Port Hardy an airport that has still not seen the wheels of the Mustang on it's runway.

Flight plan made, I fuel the airplane...main and tip tanks to give me lots of range. I like to fly on the top half of my tank, leaving extra for the unknown. An engine run-up is made...advisories collected from Flight Service and throttle advanced. I leave the runway in Nanaimo at 13:15 and climb into the blue skies, leveling off at 2500 feet above sea level. It is a near perfect day. Only few clouds along the mountain tops...a deep blue ocean...green forests lush with spring color and a sense of adventure for the few hours ahead.

I've planned alternate routes for my flight up to Port Hardy and my later return. The first will take me essentially over the highway route and then on my return, the shoreline down Johnstone Strait and Discovery Passage. The air contains a few bumps along with fairly strong cross-winds, but nothing to temper my joy of being airborne over such beautiful country. I cross familiar territory on my way up island...Rathtrevor Beach...French Creek Marina...Qualicum Beach...Denman Island...Courtney/Comox and then Campbell River. I chat a moment with Flight Service here advising them of my position and then carry on some twenty miles to the northwest where I turn toward the mountainous interior, new territory to the wings of the Mustang.

Victoria Peak at 7095 feet ASL Northwest of Campbell River.

Cloud bases here and there are touching the tops of the higher mountains. Fresh snow has given the peaks an icing sugar look. Standing tall to my left at 7095 feet is Mount Victoria, a sharp shoulder of granite somewhat hazy in the near distance but perfect for a photo, the first I'm sure of many in the miles to come. The road below twists and turns...first to the west, then north...west again...a little south and so on, eventually taking me between snowcapped peaks and a narrow valley at 5300 and 5900 feet respectfully,

Shortly after rounding this snowy peak Woss will come into view.

into a long valley below with Woss Lake...the small town of Woss with it's friendly looking gravel airstrip

Woss through a reflective canopy.

Woss looking south.

and then to the northwest, Nimpkish Lake from which I can see Queen Charlotte Sound. On the shores, Port McNeil. Now an hour and thirty minutes into the flight I call Port Hardy Flight Service some ten minutes along the coastline. They suggest with their current winds, I use runway 34..pretty much into wind. The landscape here is much flatter than that over which I have been flying, and looks downright friendly! Nice to be over this kind of topography again. Very quickly I'm within the control zone and Flight Service gives me number one for landing.

Base leg for runway 34 - Port Hardy.

Into the wind and pointed toward the ocean, it was a great run down final with a squeaked on landing. What a good feeling to be here...a new runway for the log book...new territory...perhaps some new people to meet and certainly a beautiful airport to enjoy right on the banks of the Sound.

I parked and was quickly greeted by two excited Fuel Attendants. They had never seen a Mustang ll before and in fact claimed they had never seen such a beautiful homebuilt aircraft. Would I mind if they took a picture? My size seven cap quickly became much too tight but it was worth the suffering to receive the compliments and attending good service.

Fueled up and ready for the shoreline trip home.

Ah, but but good service did not include a discount on the $1.15 / litre cost of fuel! Ah well...it was still worth it. I spent an interesting hour talking and then poking about the airport facility but with time moving quickly I decided it was best to head for home. A quick visit to Flight Service brought good news about a tailwind for my trip home, so with Flight Plan made, I said goodbye...checked the airplane over...taxiied to Runway 29. After another engine run-up and a final call to Flight Service the wheels rolled again and I was off on part two of my afternoon adventure, this time heading home via the shoreline.

Port McNeil with airstrip in upper left hand corner.

Sointula on Malcolm Island passed under the wing to the north and next came Alert Bay,

Alert Bay airstrip.

a small Island below with a wonderful Native Artifacts Museum, visited some years before on a land-based trip. Alert Bay has it's own airstrip perched on the top of the island, so I did a once-by that to check it out for further flights. It appears to be a great destination, and we also know of a wonderful little Italian Restaurant there. But that will be another time. I do a 360 degree turn here and then head east along the shoreline. Wearing a life jacket on this leg of the trip, as it is over water most of the way, I climb to 6500 feet for further safety. From here the view is magnificent as I motor on down Johnstone Strait.

Islands in Johnstone Strait.

No Cruise ships yet, but thousands of Islands to the north of my route...a maze of channels and even a few familiar names from my Powell River days fresh out of High School in 1957. Names like Sullivan Bay...Minstrel Island (I wonder about it's History)...Knight Inlet...Desolation Sound and Butte Inlet. I especially remember this as I was a passenger in a Cessna 170 on floats for a flight up this inlet in 1958 only the second time I'd ever been in an airplane. It was even more beautiful this time.

Somewhere along this route hunger reminded me of the sandwich Pat had so kindly included in my flight kit. Out it came and let me tell you there is nothing like an appetite and a good sandwich enjoyed at 6500 feet over Inside Passage West Coast Scenery.

At Chatham Point, Johnstone Strait became Discovery Passage with Quadra Island on my left and very quickly Campbell River and familiar territory came into sight.

Campbell River comes into view.

Another call to Flight Service at Campbell River to let them know my progress and I was cleared through their zone. I left the shoreline at this point to clear to the west of the Comox Air Force Base and continued southward to Qualicum Beach, crossing the airport at 4000 feet. Still with a tailwind I decided on a straight flight direct to Nanaimo so pointed the nose downhill slightly to give me a descent of about 250 feet per minute and enjoyed about a fifteen minute run at 180 miles per hour. This brought me to within sight of the airport at about 2000 feet where I began slowing the aircraft for crossing mid-field at 1000 feet and picking up my downwind approach to Runway 34.

On final runway 34 Nanaimo.

Another squeaked on landing some one hour and eighteen minutes from Port Hardy.

And so....another entry for the log book. The Log book entry will read: May 8/2001...Mustang ll...Pilot John Veale...Flight particulars: Nanaimo - Port Hardy and Port Hardy, Shoreline to Nanaimo. Flight times 1:40 & 1:18 respectively. But when I read it back a year or two from now, my memory will fill in many blanks....probably a little like the story above.

How lucky I am to have wings...and a mate who encourages me to fly!

Thankyou Patti.

John Veale EAA 8350
 


 
 

Visit a Mustang 11 site!