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IAN'S PALM PHOTO GALLERY
 
Archontophoenix alexandrae at the UCLA, CA.
Arenga engleri at the Palm Centre in London.  Photo courtesy of Imtiaz McDoom-Gaffoor.
Bismarckia nobilis at the San Diego Zoo, CA, 1997.
Brahea armata in a private garden in Shelton, WA.
A beautiful specimen of Brahea armata at the Lakeside Palmetum, Oakland, California.  I tookthis picture early in the morning.
Brahea decumbens.  Photo courtesy of Tony Cerbone.
Brahea edulis in a private garden in Olympia, WA.
Butia capitata on Eastlake Blvd. in Seattle.  This palm was moved to the Woodland Park Zoo.
Butia capitata, a fantastic silvery form at Kew Gardens, London.  Photo courtesy of Imtiaz McDoom-Gaffoor.
Caryota gigas at Dick Endt's palm nursery in New Zealand.  Photo courtesy of Peter Richardson.
Massive Ceroxylon quindiense at Dick Endt's palm nursery in New Zealand.  These plants are just starting to form a trunk.  Also visible are Caryota ochlandra at right, and Howea forsteriana towards the front.  Photo courtesy of Peter Richardson.
Trunk base of the above palm; photo courtesy of Peter Richardson.
Ceroxylon quindiense at Strybing Arboretum, San Francisco, October 2003.
The beautiful, enormous silvery fronds of Ceroxylon quindiense.
Petioles of a juvenile Ceroxylon at the Lakeside Palmetum, Oakland, California.  The fronds on this still-trunkless palm stick up about 25 feet into the air!  I wanted to take a dead frond and bring it home, but it was about twice as long as my car.  That's my wallet stuck in there for scale.
The beautiful ringed trunk of a Ceroxylon sp. at the Oakland Bay Palmetum.  Each ring marks a leaf scar from a frond that has been shed.  It is amazing how much height is gained with each new frond.
Chamaerops humilis on 85th St. NW in Seattle, WA.
Chamaerops humilis in a private garden in Seattle, WA.
Good use of Chamaerops humilis in a formal garden with Cupressus macrocarpa in background, Shore Acres State Park and Botanic Garden, OR.
Chamaerops humilis var. cerifera at Steamboat Island Nursery, Olympia, WA.
Chamaedorea radicalis in a private garden in Seattle, WA.
Chamaedorea radicalis X microspadix in a private garden in Olympia, WA.
Dypsis baronii with Alcantarea rubra at Dick Endt's palm nursery in New Zealand. Photo courtesy of Peter Richardson.
Euterpe edulis in a New Zealand garden.  Photo courtesy of Peter Richardson.
Another Euterpe edulis in a New Zealand garden.  Photo courtesy of Peter Richardson.
Juania australis at Strybing Arboretum, San Francisco, with a Ceroxylon trunk in the background.  There aren't many of these in the United States at all, and this is one of the largest.
Jubaea chilensis at Jungle Fever Exotics, Tacoma, WA.  This palm sustained little damage in the freeze of December 1998.
Laccospadix australasiaca.  Photo courtesy of Scott Ridges.
Linospadix monostachya.  Photo courtesy of Scott Ridges.
Livistona australis.  Photo courtesy of Scott Ridges.
Nannorrhops ritchiana at the Palm Centre, London.  Photo courtesy of Imtiaz McDoom-Gaffoor.
Parajubaea cocoides at the Palm Centre, London.  This palm is now dead after temperatures of -4°C/25°F.  Photo courtesy of Imtiaz McDoom-Gaffoor.
A group of three Parajubaea cocoides at Dick Endt's palm nursery in New Zealand. Photo courtesy of Peter Richardson.
A carefully maintained Phoenix canariensis at San Diego State University, CA.
A monster Phoenix canariensis in Harbor, OR.
This Phoenix canariensis in Gold Beach, OR is the most northerly known unprotected, large Phoenix palm in the Western Hemisphere.
Plectocomia himalayana seedling in a private garden in Olympia, WA.
Ravanea rivularis at Alberon Park in Auckland.  Photo courtesy of Peter Richardson.
Rhapidophyllum hystrix in a private garden in Yachats, OR.
A magnificent Rhapidophyllum hystrix in a botanic garden in Costa Rica.  Photo courtesy of Brandt Maxwell.
Rhopalostylis sapida at Shore Acres State Park and Botanic Garden, OR.
Rhopalostylis sapida in habitat in New Zealand.  Photo courtesy of Peter Richardson.
Rhopalostylis sapida looking very elegant in the shade in habitat near Marlborough Sounds, New Zealand.  Photo courtesy of Ralph Booth.
This Rhopalostylis at Alberon Park in Auckland is not labeled, but it may be R. baueri var. kermadecensis.  Photo courtesy of Peter Richardson.
Sabal bermudiana in a private garden in Shelton, WA, with S. minor at right and Brahea armata at left.
Trachycarpus fortunei in a snowstorm, photographed by me at noon on January 12th, 1998, just north of Olympia, WA.
The above Trachycarpus fortunei in the summertime.
Interesting use of Trachycarpus fortunei with Ficus pumila as a bonsai, Jungle Fever Exotics, Tacoma, WA.
Good use of Trachycarpus fortunei with Phyllostachys vivax in a private garden on Vashon Island, WA.
Trachycarpus fortunei at Jungle Fever Exotics, Tacoma, WA.  This palm has just had a lot of other growth cleared from around it, showing how it makes much more luxuriant growth in the shade.
Trunk of Trachycarpus fortunei.
This Trachycarpus fortunei in the Sierra Nevada foothills, CA is about 20' tall (that's a two story building at right) and yet has keeps all its older fronds down the entire length of the trunk.  Trachycarpus thrives with a little heat, summer water and shade.
Two unusually impressive, skirted Trachycarpus fortunei near the botany greenhouse at the University of Washinton in Seattle.  I suspect these must get a lot of summer water with good soil.
This palm at Quail Botanic Gardens, Encinitas, CA is labeled "Trachycarpus martianus, Indian Form", but is actually a very attractive, silvery form of T. fortunei.
A young Trachycarpus martianus, UC Berkeley Botanic Gardens, California.
Indomentum on the emerging spears of Trachycarpus martianus.
Trachycarpus takil at an old church in northern India.  Photo courtesy of Adam Schuyler.
Trachycarpus wagnerianus at the Hoyt Arboretum, Portland, OR.
This Trachycarpus wagnerianus at the State Capitol Conservatory in Olympia, WA is probably the Pacific Northwest's largest.  The lower leaves have been pruned off.
Trachycarpus wagnerianus at Western Hills Rare Plant Nursery, Occidental, California.
Trithrinax campestris in England.  These palms were shipped from Argentina.  Photo courtesy of Imtiaz McDoom-Gaffoor.
This Washingtonia at Stevens Memorial Hospital in Edmunds, WA is probably the oldest outdoor Washingtonia in the Pacific Northwest.  It may be a hybrid although it looks a lot like W. robusta.  It is somewhat close to a vent that blows warm air out of the hospital, but this vent only seems to increase the temperature around the palm by a degree or two in winter.  What may be even more beneficial is that the moving air probably never allows dew or frost to form on the palm.
Close-up of the leafbases of the Edmunds Washingtonia.
Washingtonia robusta in Harbor, OR.
Washingtonia filifera (with trunk of W. robusta in front) at Hearst Castle, CA.
The ultimate cold-hardy palm in Moses Lake, WA.  Doesn't need water or fertilizer, grows in any climate, won't drop leaves, and very easy to germinate!  I actually think these are done in pretty good taste, though it is unfortunate more people aren't aware that some real palms could probably be grown in this area.
A closer view of one of the Moses Lake Palms.

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