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Frequently Asked Questions


1) Preface
You have questions, I have answers. This page addresses some of the more frequent questions that come along.

2) Can different versions of the Mac OS network together? Like 7.1 and 8.5?
Yes, you can network different Mac OS versions together. There is one gotcha about system 6, that has to do with sharing files. In system 6, the AppleShare extension only came with Apple network servers, not the normal Macs. Because of this, system 6 Macs can look at other files on a network, but can't share their own files unless they have the server software.

3) How do I know whether I'm using Open Transport or "Classic" networking? What's the difference?
The easiest way to know whether you're using Open Transport or "classic" networking is to check the Control Panels folder. If you have a control panel called AppleTalk, you're using Open Transport. If you have one called Network, you're using classic networking. If you have neither, you need to install the network software from the system disc.

4) Can I run an intranet across a LocalTalk network?
You can run an intranet (a TCP/IP-based network) on any kind of network wiring, LocalTalk or Ethernet.

5) Can you use either serial port (modem or printer) for a LocalTalk network?
Both serial ports are equally capable of sending network signals. The only major difference is that the Mac defaults to the printer port, so it's probably a good idea to attach other items to the modem port, and always run the LocalTalk network through the printer port.

6) Is there a way to let more than 10 people access my Mac at once?
If you work in a high-traffic network, you may soon discover that normal AppleTalk networks have two "limits." You can't mount more than 10 network servers at a time and no more than 10 people can mount a shared volume at a time. These are limits hard-wired into the network software and there unfortunately appears to be no direct way around them. One option you have is to switch to an intranet qm_icon picture and use an FTP server, although this will take a little more work than the typical AppleTalk file sharing to set up.

7) Should I use shielded or unshielded cable for my Ethernet network?
If you're selecting cable for your Ethernet qm_icon picture network, you may run into both shielded and unshielded cable. You can actually use either without difficulty, although people tend to use unshielded in networks. You might use shielded cable if you're setting up a network in an area with a high change of RF interference. Since networks are a kind of data transmission, interference can cut down on network performance.

Contents of Three Macs & a Printer are ©1996-1999 Matthew Glidden (except for the bits that aren't).

Questions or feedback? Feel free to send mail.

[This page was last updated on 3/7/99; 2:07:21 PM.]



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