Partitioning using partition Magic

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Table of Contents

1.0 Introduction

1.1 What Is a Partition ?
1.2 Constraints

2.0 Partition Types

2.1 Partition Types
2.2 Primary Partitions
2.3 Logical Partitions

3.0 Partitioning Requirements

3.1 What Partitions Do I Need ?
3.2 Pc Operating System and File System Cross Reference

4.0 Formatting Partitions

4.1 Why format ?

5.0 Installation

5.1 Under Windows
5.2 Loading from Floppy

6.0 Using Partition Magic

6.1 Using partiton Magic

7.0 Partitioning Ideas

7.1 Single Operating System
7.2 Dual Booting System
7.3 Triple Booting System





1.0 Itroduction

1.1 What Is a Partition ?

Partitioning is when you divide a single hard drive into many logical drives. Partitions are contiguous sets of blocks on a hard drive that are treated as Independent disks. The partition table relates sections of the hard drive to Partitions.

Why do we need multiple partitions ?

Multiple partitions are used so that not all data is lost as system Corruption is only local to each partition, only the data on the specified Partition.

Disk space efficiency can be increased. Depending on your usage, you can Format partitions with varying block sizes. If your data is in a large Number of small files (less than 1k) and your partition uses 4k sized Blocks, you are wasting 3k for every file. On average you waste one half Of a block for every file, so matching block size to the average size of Your files are important if you have many files.

By putting constraints on the users storage space allows you to restrict the amount of data that can be stored. By doing this you can ensure that other things than the operating system die when the allocated space is used.

Secure your data by physically separating it from other files, allowing easy backups, disk mirroring, and image restoration

1.2 Constraints

Overlapping of partitions will cause problems within the system. Any gaps between partitions while not harmful are a waste and are not an efficient use of disk space. A disk need not be partitioned completely. You may decide to leave some unpartitioned space at the end of your disk and partition it later. Partitions cannot be moved but they can be resized and copied using special software. You can also only have four primary partitions on a disk.

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2.0 Partition Types

2.1 Partition Types

Various operating systems use their own specific type of filing system, some are common to others. For example: WIN2000 uses NTFS whereas if this was used for Windows 98 it would be unusable.

2.2 Primary Partitions

Only four partition entries could be held on the original partition table which was installed as part of the boot sector. These partitions are now called primary partitions.

2.3 Logical Partitions
On the hard drive one primary partition may be sub partitioned; these are known as logical partitions. This effectively allows us to skirt the historical four partition limitation. The primary partition that houses the logical partitions is called an extended partition and thus has its own system type. Different to primary partitions, logical partitions must be contiguous. The number of logical partition is unlimited which means that each logical partition contains a pointer to the next logical partition.

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3.0 Partitioning Requirements

3.1 What Partitions Do I Need

The following will be needed to boot your drive for the operating system you are about to partition:
A primary partition
One or more swap partitions
Zero or more primary/logical partitions
Any other drive:
One or more primary/logical partitions
Zero or more swap partitions

3.2 Pc Operating System and File System Cross Reference


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4.0 Formatting Partitions

4.1 Why format?

Formatting various partitions can be done while they are being created; this allows you to save time while installing such operating systems as Windows 2000. To format a partition to choose an option to format while the partition is being created. Partitions can also be formatted while in the windows or DOS environment by using a simple command line, however you may not format the current operating drive(The one your in). Partition Magic has the ability to check for errors of to skip the error checking. Formatting a drive with out any error checking is very quick and easy.

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5.0 Installation

5.1 Installation under windows

This procedure is for Partition Magic 4.0; if you are installing a different version, the following procedure may vary. On the opening screen, click on Next, enter the appropriate serial number, click on next, click on "yes" to agree to the 'software licence agreement', type in "YES" and click next, click next, click next. Make sure "typical" is selected and click on next, click on Next and Partition Magic will install. When it is done, uncheck the box that says "Yes, I would like to create these diskettes" and click Next. Uncheck the box that says "Yes, I want to view the README file" and click on "Finish". Click Cancel so that you do not register and then click on "never register" (we will be uninstalling this program when we are done with it).

5.2 Installation under DOS

Simply copy the files from either the folder contained on this disk. Or simply unzip the file at the end oh how to partition. Then its a simple case of copying the disk to your Dos partition. Or you can simply run Partition magic from the floppy.

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6.0 Using Partition Magic

6.1 Using Partition Magic

Once you have decied where and what sort of partiton you require simply run the program and click on the drive and partition you are going to use. Choose you size and file type. It is also a good idea to look under preferances to see if error checking is turned off or on. Error checking off is ideal for quick formats of the whole drive before a windows installation. Once you are safe and sure of your partition simply enter ok and press ok.

N.B if you create a partition before your present operating system's partition the boot.ini file will require changing.

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7.0 Partitioning Ideas


7.1 Single Operating System
A Single operating system (win 98) on a 40Gig hard drive.
Partition 1: 10gig Primary fat32. Parttiton 2: 20gig fat32 logical. Partition 3: 10gig fat32 logical.

7.2 Dual Booting System
A dual booting system running Windows 98 and Windows 2000 on a 40 gig Hard drive.
Partition 1: 10gig Primary fat32 (win 98). Partition 2: 10gig Primary ntfs (win2k). Partition 3 20gig fat32 logical.

7.3 Triple Booting System
A triple booting system running DOS, Windows 2000 and Windows XP on a 40gig hard drive.
Partition 1: 300MB Primary fat16 (DOS). Partition 2: 10gig Primary ntfs (win2k). Partition 3: 10gig Primary ntfs (windows xp). Partition 4: 19.7gig logical ntfs.

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