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Chapter 6: The Altar of Relativity

Down through the ages, wise old heads have held that God is everywhere and everything and knows all. If God is everywhere and everything and knows all, then we must die or become again the component parts of God. If we believe in this God we will most certainly die; because we have made no space or place for ourselves in our faith. We will die because we believe in death. Belief in an omniscient omnipresent omnipotent God makes us nothing more than an intrinsic part of God. If we are intrinsic to God, we may have a sense of individual identity, but we cannot allow ourselves individual life. Our life can only be dependent upon and an actual part of such a God. The highest level of life we may reach within such a God is that of an unborn child still attached to the umbilical cord and floating in the womb. If we believe in an omniscient God, we have no belief in individual life for ourselves at all. If God knows everything we need to know in order to live, then all we need to know in order to live is God; and when we do know God, we will only be a part of God and have no individual life of our own. If God is our life, we do not exist. Belief in an omniscient God will never allow us to rise above the level of a molecule in the universal God. If we believe that God is omniscient, we allow ourselves no higher potential than to become a microscopic shred of the entity that God is.

The omniscient omnipotent omnipresent God is a God we have intellectually manufactured to fill our need. What we believe about ourselves has given us a false need, a need to be destroyed. Because we do not know the truth of ourselves, and even fear the truth of ourselves, our God can only be a God who must destroy us for our own good. We tolerate this false perception of God, because we still think like children. We think like children, because we do not know all of the truth; and until we do, we are forced to believe in a God who has all the answers we need. When we believe that God has all the answers we need to find real life, we make him our destroyer. We make our inability to learn everything we need to know in time, the cause of our death. We make the omniscient God destroy us for our error and weakness. This is the reason of a child.

A child prefers punishment at the hands of his parents, just or unjust, to being abandoned by his parents. Only the natural metamorphosis into adulthood will cause a child to willingly separate from his parents. The adult is no longer dependent on his parents for life, in fact is driven by his natural structure to find his own life; so he chooses whether or not to accept the punishment of his parents.

The child is an adult when he realizes that he has gained the same potential as his parents. The only way the parents may reform an unwilling adult child is to destroy him. If we are adult, and are not in possession of all of the truth and believe in an omniscient omnipotent omnipresent God, we have thrust ourselves into a paradox that can only be resolved by our death and rebirth as children.

It is our own inner contradiction in terms that brings us to disaster. Our lack of truth gives us a wide-eyed childish need for an omniscient God. We fear our lack of truth is responsible for our dying, and we create an omniscient God to give ourselves hope. Once we develop an adult sense of identity we must either abandon our hope in the omniscient God or abandon our adulthood. Since our intellect dominates our body and our intellect is the source of our childish perspective, it is our adult body that suffers the consequence of our childish intellect. There is no space or place for our true adulthood in an omniscient omnipotent omnipresent God, and such a God is the only hope that is acceptable to our childish intellect; so our intellect abandons the manifestation of adulthood that the body is. This is death.

If there is to be a space or place for us to realize our true adult potential, God cannot be omniscient, omnipotent, or omnipresent. There must be a place for us outside of God. The boundaries of this place must be as potentially limitlessly expansive as our God. God must not be able to plumb the depths of this place, indeed, must be unable to go there without us. We must be the light of this place. We must be this place.

If we believe in an omniscient God, we simply can never live. The adulthood of our body is inevitable. Since we are already alive when we are children in Eden, as soon as we believe in a God who knows all the truth necessary for us to live, we condemn ourselves to death. If we believe that God knows everything we need to know, we are trying to become God and not ourselves. To be sure, we need to know some of the truth of God to live; but if we do not know the truth of ourselves, we can never live as ourselves. If we are to live as adults, there must be something to know about ourselves that God does not know. If we are to live, there must be something true about us that is not true about God. If we are to live, there must be something true about God that is not true about us. If we are to live, there must be something we can know that God can never know. If we are to live, there must be something God can know that we can never know.

God willingly gives us all he knows that we need to know to live. In fact, we are born into this world as children already alive. The metamorphosis into adulthood kills us; because to live as adults, we must know something that God does not know. God cannot keep us alive as adults, because he simply does not know what we need to know. We may not live as adults without knowing something that God does not know. Deep in our hearts, we all know this to be true, so we end up making sin and death into the things we can know that God does not know. Our intellect believes in the omniscient God or the God with every answer, but our body knows the truth, in fact, is the truth. Sin and death are nothing more than our adult body rejecting our infantile intellectual perspective. Because our body is the truth, and cannot lie, and is dominated by our intellect, adulthood for us has become death.

We begin our life in this world in the fleeting Eden of childhood. We may define Eden or childhood as: simply living because we are alive, seeing simply because we see, hearing simply because we hear. We may live a good length of time in Eden without any awareness of God at all. Part of what drives us out of Eden is becoming aware of God. Most often it is a false God we become aware of. We are led out, or drawn out, or driven out of Eden; because our parents, teachers, indeed everyone we know, have already set up their intellectual households in the east of Eden. As children we simply cannot resist their influence.

Once we have become aware of God, we are driven by a real hunger for God. We formulate our conclusions about God according to a tradition of error. We accept the idea that a God is the original source of life, and bend the concept to mean that God is all we need to know to live. We foolishly allow ourselves to believe that God is omnipotent, omniscient, and omnipresent. At this point we have firmly placed our intellectual foundation in the east of Eden. In the east of Eden, God is omnipotent, omniscient, and omnipresent. Since we have gone to live there, the only God we see reinforces our misperception. The implications of the phenomenon of a Christ is meant to startle us out of our suicidal misperception, but rarely does. Our intellect controls our perception of the legendary Christ as easily as it dominates our own flesh. Once we are intellectually east of Eden, the suppressed truth of our body begins to manifest itself as rebellion; and our intellect eventually begins to seek peace for the sake of peace and finally is forced to opt for the peace of death that comes from abandoning its body. Once we live in the east of Eden, the truth of ourselves tantalizes us toward death like a flame does to a moth.

Essentially what kills us is the truth of the structure of ourselves and the truth of the structure of God. We attempt to destroy a necessary part of the truth of life that we are, in order to gain what we think is the only necessary truth of life from God. Our need for the a God with every answer can only kill us, because we have already condemned to death a necessary part of the answer that we are.

As children in Eden, we literally inhabit ourselves and count the outside world as an unfolding curiosity. We are drawn out of ourselves by fear. Everyone around us is dying. We begin to believe that we cannot escape death. We cease to live in ourselves, because we do not believe we know enough to escape death. We turn to an idea of God for knowledge. We hope God will give us what we need to know to live. The life we do not understand and hope to gain from God, we have already snuffed out. We are trapped because we do not understand and only the truth can free us. The very truth which we have discarded in fear is a necessary part of what we need to know.

The truth of what we are is an irresistible force. When we go against the force of the truth of what we are, we go against life. When we look for life from a God, we are denying that we are alive. When we look for God, we deny God and ourselves, and that is why we die. A Christ has come. Look no further. God is the most known. Our desire to know God is founded on fear not on the truth. Belief in the resurrection of the legendary Christ is meant to overcome fear. We may not know any God and live except in the truth. The knowledge of our idea of God that we gain through terror can only kill us. Christ came to end terror and restore hope. If we have hope, we may discover a revelation of the truth and not be killed by it. If we can withstand all of the truth, we may find life with no death in between.

All of the world around us is a universal God. Our quest for life can only send us deeper into a universal internal God and farther away from an external relationship with him. The more deeply we are involved with, the more intimate our understanding is of, the more dependent we are upon, the cosmic and universal world around us that is God, the farther away we are from a living personal relationship with him. Our intimacy with the internal God cannot evolve into a personal relationship with him any more readily than our intimacy with the internal workings of our mother before we are born, can evolve into a personal relationship with her without our birth. Prenatal intimacy is not life. The severed cord and the post-natal kiss is life.

If we live now inside of our idea of God, and he is the source of our life, we cannot truly realize him until we are separated from him. Separation from God as the source of our life is birth not death. The death common to humanity is intimate internal union. Only birth can take us to the place of external relationship. Being born is living where God is not. When we live where our idea of God is not, then we may finally live with our idea of God.

Traditional Christianity teaches that we are born hopelessly stained by original sin; or with a sin nature unable to resist the temptation of the world around us; or born with a compulsion to sin. We are either taught that sin is hereditary or that we have an irresistible urge to sin. All of these ideas are wrong. We do not genetically pass original sin from generation to generation nor do we inherit or develop an irresistible urge to sin. Essentially, what we pass on from generation to generation is an intellectual error that creates in us a compulsion to sin. Because the thinking of this whole present world is warped, none of us has yet escaped the compulsion to sin.

All of our present theology begins in the initial war against sin to apply overcoming power, which is fundamentally intellectual force, against our compulsion to sin. We are taught that we have a choice to sin or not to sin. We are taught that we must choose not to sin. This is a battle we cannot win. The legendary Christ seems to indicate that just contemplating the possibility of sin is sin. If this is true, then we do not have a choice to sin or not to sin. In order to choose to sin or not to sin, we must contemplate sin. Obviously, our theology is wrong, and we have misunderstood and misapplied the law.

Furthermore, if we believe that we cannot overcome sin, the legendary Christ cannot save us; because it is not a Christ we then believe in. If we sin, it is because we are adults, and we have coupled our adulthood to the thinking disorder in the world. The legendary Christ asks us to be come like little children. He asks us to assume the relativity of children in order to free us from our compulsion to sin by removing one half of the cause of the cataclysmic reaction that occurs when our adulthood become infected with the thinking disorder in the world. If we have become like little children, the thinking disorder in the world cannot create in us a compulsion to sin. We may sin as children, but it is sin without consequence, because we do not believe we are adults. Only an adult may suffer the consequence of sin. This is why our body dies and our intellect lives on. Our body is adult but our intellect is a child.

When the legendary Christ asks us to become like little children, he is asking us to alter our relativity. If we have intellectually altered our relativity and become like little children, we will discover that though we have the opportunity to sin, we are not compelled to sin. If we have truly become like little children, we live in the freedom of obedience where we may err without consequence. If we still feel compelled to sin, we have not become like little children.

If we still have a compulsion to sin, it is because something in us is still adult. Altering our relativity to that of a child does not free us from the thinking disorder in the world, but only frees us from our sense of identity and makes the thinking disorder in the world incapable of producing a compulsion to sin within us. If we still have a compulsion to sin, our faith in our Christ has not yet saved us. We have not yet become like little children. If we have realized cosmic adulthood, most of us do not become like little children until we die. Death frees us from our adult body and our compulsion to sin.

If it is possible for us to intellectually alter our relativity by denying our true sense of identity and claiming to be little children though we have adult bodies; then it is just as possible for us to intellectually alter our relativity and deny our true sense of intellectual identity and claim to have an adult intellect. This is in fact what most of us do. Because we do this, sin condemns us. An adult may suffer the consequence of sin. If we dare to claim an adult intellectual identity, we had better overcome the thinking disorder in the world and restore our intellect to its proper relativity to the truth of ourselves and the truth of our idea of God; or we will create in ourselves an irresistible compulsion to sin; and we will suffer the ultimate consequence of that sin, because we claim to be adult. If we must be adult, we had better know the truth. Adulthood without the truth is a place of imagination we are not likely to return from.

To be adult is to be fit for eternity. If our intellect is still contemplating sin, it is not fit for eternity. An intellect that is still contemplating sin is not in full possession of the truth. It is this lack of truth that gives the intellect its compulsion to sin. If our intellect is still dealing with the phantom conflict of sinning and not sinning on a daily basis, it is not in possession of all the truth. The contemplation of sin is an entirely imagined nightmare. If we are imagining something, in this case a choice to sin or not to sin, it is because we do not know the real answer. The errors we intellectually contemplate, indeed the errors we make, are not actual. If our intellect is still contemplating sin, we are living in a relativity that is non-cosmic. Our intellect separates from our body at death, because our intellect and our body are not in the same relativity. The relativity of our intellect is nothing more than a phantom world. It is virtually inconsequential. It is a phantom land from which cosmic definition is the only exit.

Our intellect is the source of and the determiner of our relativity. It came into being because of our body. Our body by itself is not capable of error. It lives by the truth. If we are still contemplating sin, it is because our intellect has not yet found an eternal home or kingdom to rule. If we are still contemplating sin, it is because our intellect is still trying to take the kingdom of God by violence. The kingdom of our idea of God is us. Our true kingdom is cosmic marriage. Our intellect is aware that it can manipulate the body. It is this awareness that gives it its false sense of kingship over the body. There are no kings in eternity only marriages. Our intellect is nothing more than a rebellious child.

We know the course of human events. Together with others, we form the force of ignition of every stellar human moment. The greatest in flash and flame of these is nothing more than a dim torch in a dark endless cavern of death. All of us together, though we form one single burning light, cannot find the opening into life out of this permanent night. We may form one single mind, and sing one single song in one single midnight cathedral, but the light of our vision, the sound of our voice, though it light the walls of our existence, though it shake the rafters of our being, can only bring the house down upon our heads. We live underground, out of sight of heaven, already swallowed by the earth. If we all became a single light, we would still find ourselves here, in the darkness we cannot light - the truth of the darkness we are.

We are born living in a grave, buried alive. Hatred cannot free us from this grave, but neither can love. Disobedience cannot free us from this grave, but neither can obedience. Abandoning ourselves cannot free us from this grave, but neither can abandoning our idea of God. Destroying ourselves cannot free us from this grave, but neither can destroying God. The truth of what we are, and the truth of what God is, has put us in this grave, has put the earth between us.

Our present understanding of the religion of sacrifice, which we call Christianity, cannot give us life. It is impossible for us as western Christians to give ourselves up to destruction at the hands of this world for the sake of the legendary Christ. Essentially, we have neither the faith to surrender, nor the substance of anything to give up. We know too much about ourselves to willingly surrender, and we know too little about ourselves to have anything at all to give up. We sit perpetually on a fence in a permanent night, awaiting an inevitable death, hoping to learn the truth about ourselves and our God at a safe distance from the cataclysm, and then throw ourselves into the flames as a holocaust and rise from the ashes. Our burnt offering can never be. We have no faith.

Our Christian faith demands that we give ourselves up for the sake of Christ. Essentially, what we believe about ourselves is what we are. The faith we profess as western Christians demands that we give up what we believe about ourselves to what we believe about God. In the west, we prefer the scientific method. We prefer to observe ourselves at a safe distance and compile information about ourselves for later reference and synthesis.

Our miasmal propensity for philosophical fence sitting can only make us non-entities, can only give us permanent death. There is an intrinsic, fundamental, and terminal error in the thinking of the fence sitter. If we have gone up to sit on a fence above the cataclysm; it is because we believe that from the safety of the fence we may discover the truth of ourselves and our God. Alas, we cannot discover the whole truth of ourselves from the safety of the fence, because part of the truth of ourselves is as individual as we are. Collective observation of others cannot give us the individual part of the truth of ourselves. If we are not actively involved in the cataclysm, we cannot discover the individual part of the truth of ourselves.

The individual truth we seek is intrinsic to us, and we cannot find it without opening up our present perception of ourselves on the jagged edge of this life and bleeding out the essence of eternity hidden within us by our own intellectual misperception. We cannot learn the truth of ourselves by safely preserving our intellectual misperception with us up on the fence. We cannot have peace for the sake of peace. Science and socialism cannot give us real life. We must come down from our fences. The poet may die but the poetry will live.

Our understanding of the religion of sacrifice, which causes us to initiate our climb up the fence, is fundamentally wrong. We hope to learn the truth of ourselves from the safety of the fence and then come down from the fence and abandon ourselves to a God. We believe that we can abandon the truth of what we are to God and then be restored to life by God. This is absurd. What then can we possibly be restored to? If we abandon the truth of what we are in order to find life, which is essentially the truth of what we are, how can we then be restored to the truth of what we are? We can only be restored to something less than our original potential, because we have counted our original potential as worthless and given it over to our idea of God to do with as he wills. If we have found the truth of what we are, we dare not surrender up our birthright for something less. Any God could hardly look on us with kindness and mercy if we give what we are to destruction so that we may become something less. In such a case, the God is within his rights to look on us with disdain.

Obviously our thinking is warped. The purpose of the religion of sacrifice can hardly be to destroy the truth. The sacrifice we place on the altar must be something other than the truth. The flame on the altar is the truth.

The altar we place our sacrifice on is an altar of relativity. The flame on the altar is relativity altering truth. The sacrifice we place on the altar is our intellectual misperception, our warped relativity and our belief in lies. Our true sacrifice is what we believe about God and what we believe about ourselves. We literally sacrifice what we believe about ourselves to what we believe about God. In the flames of the altar, both are consumed. If we knew the truth, we would not be the sacrifice on the altar. We would be the flames.

As Christians, we should believe that we must give ourselves up even to death for the sake of Christ. For the sake of Christ, we should give up what we believe about ourselves to what we believe about God. This allows both lies to be consumed on the altar of this life in the flames of the truth of Christ. For Christ, we may sacrifice our false selves to a false God. Through Christ, our true self may be saved by the true God, and our false self destroyed by the false God.

Since Christ is the flame on the altar; he consumes our false perception of ourselves, and our false God, and leaves us with only our trust in him. When we are left with only Christ, our false God and our false self are dead; and our true self is reborn as a child in the household of Christ. If we avoid the fire that Christ is, and remain safely on the fence, if we discover any truth, because the truth is unconquerable; it will become a cataclysmic wildfire that consumes the fence along with us. Only the truth can survive the fire. If we remain on the fence, we will have little or no truth in us when the wildfire comes; and we will be left in ashes that we cannot rise from. We may not avoid death by sitting on the fence. To avoid death, we must go into the fire that Christ is and become a flame. The only place of safety is in the flames.

We may theoretically become aware of all the truth of God, but that truth cannot save us from death, if we do not know the truth of ourselves as well. All the truth of God would more than likely kill us, if we did not first know the truth of ourselves. God could possibly teach us everything about himself, but he cannot teach us everything about ourselves without dying. If we do not know the truth of ourselves, the truth of God cannot save us from death. If God were to sacrifice himself and die to teach us the truth of ourselves then death would be part of the truth. If God dies, there is no eternal life. Since we do not know the truth of ourselves, we may only find eternal life through the sacrifice of ourselves. The lie that we believe about ourselves must die, not the truth of God.

God knows the truth of himself and is well are that his death could never save us. Through Christ, he tricks us into the action that can save us and teach us the truth of ourselves self-sacrifice. God gave the writers of the Old Testament a concept which they could not adulterate: a savior born of their own people. Through this Christ, if we are able to believe anything at all about ourselves and God, we may give up what we believe and follow the direction of Christ and find eternal life.

If we follow the direction of Christ, we will surely die, if we do not know the truth of ourselves; but Christ tricks us into life by giving us hope beyond death. Christ is alive again after suffering death, so he gives us hope of the same fate, if we die because we follow him. Essentially, Christ is asking us to do what we already do, but offering us hope and someone to look for beyond the consequence of our error in thinking. Christ is making himself a new truth, a new God, a new source of life, beyond the God and self we presently believe in. Christ submits to the false death dealing God which our lack of the truth of ourselves has created, and asks us to do the same, which we essentially already do; since we all believe in the inevitability of death. Christ then lives again beyond death, proving that the death dealing God is not God, but only an aberrant understanding of God, which we have invented out of an inadequacy of truth. Having proved himself greater than the false God, Christ then asks us to believe that he is God and the son of God, and that he will give us life again after our false God destroys our false understanding.

Christ in his death and resurrection literally beats the false God at his own game. He asks us to allow the lies we believe about ourselves and God to be destroyed by the false perception of God they have created, something which is essentially inevitable. If we allow this to happen willingly, because we believe that Christ is the truth we seek, he promises we will live again. If we make Christ God and accept the inevitable, we will live again. The error we make, which desolates us, is to not take the legendary Christ at face value and make what he is into our God. We usually make Christ into what we already believe about God, or simply only give our idea of God lip service. We attach Christ's name to something he is not. Our perception of God and ourselves is in error. Christ is trying to give us a new perception of ourselves and our God. We must not make Christ over into our perception. We must allow Christ to make over our perception.

The son of our idea of God is able to do what our God cannot. A brother may die to save a brother from his error, but a parent may not die to save a child from his error. A brother may die for the consequences of a brother's error and save both; but a parent who dies for the consequence of a child's error will save neither. The parent who dies makes death a truth. The brother who dies makes death a lie. The death of a brother may even provide the truth of life to a brother.

Christ, by accepting the demand of God that he die, obeyed a lie and gave himself up to a false God in order to show us the truth. There was no need for Christ to die to gain life for himself. He knew the truth of God and the truth of himself. He was living and could not die. When God demanded that Christ die he was putting our demand or the demand of our false perception of God on Christ. Christ was sentenced to death for blasphemy against our false God. Christ's death was accomplished by his obedience to a demand that our false perception of God forced God to make of Christ.

The only way that Christ could die was out of obedience to his idea of God. Christ was living and had an external relationship with his Father-God and recognized the truth of himself and his idea of God. His Father-God, for our sake, purposely represented himself falsely, purposely represented himself as we, in error, thought of him, and demanded that Christ obey a lie and die. The only lie in Christ was death and a God who demands death.

Christ gave himself up to the altar and was consumed in the flames of the truth. On the altar, all that was consumed was death and the false God. Christ's body was the altar. His false understanding was the offering. His true understanding was the flame. His eternal universal nature and his external familiarity with the his idea of God made his obedience possible. His obedience made him the altar, the offering and the flames we seek. He remains still as the altar and flames awaiting our offering. Our only worthy offering is our false God, our false self, and death. On the cross it was death that died. All of the truth that the legendary Christ was, was resurrected.