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Chapter 5: Another Genesis

If our reason is without prejudice, it is logical for us to theorize that an ultimate beginning must be absolute nothing. Semasiologically, exoterically, ontologically, and empirically, absolute nothing is the best English terminology for an ultimate beginning. Absolute nothing and absolute solitude are the same theoretical term. The nature of absolute nothing is absolute solitude, and the nature of absolute solitude is absolute nothing. Absolute nothing may be self- definitive and self-provisional, because it is absolutely alone; but it can never be completely self-aware as long as it is absolutely alone. Complete self-awareness requires another to be separate from, or defined apart from. Theoretically, it may be that the only way the absolute nothing that is the absolute only may become completely self-aware, is to reproduce itself. Because its nature is absolute solitude, this is not possible.

Since the absolute nothing that is the absolute only may not reproduce itself, if it is ever to gain the fulfillment of complete self- awareness, it must evolve or be born from what it is as something else; and then give birth to or reproduce others from what it has become. What it has become, and that born of what it has become, may relate to one another as two completely self-aware entities.

The absolute nothing that is the absolute only must inevitably become something else because of its very nature. The absolute nothing that is the absolute only does not rationally choose to be born from itself as something else, nor can it resist its self birth once it occurs. Whatever intellectual recognition of itself becomes apparent to itself, is automatically, irresistibly, evolutionary to its nature. The absolute nothing that is the absolute only may not reject self-awareness once it has become self-aware.

If the absolute nothing that is the absolute only discovers in itself a desire to reproduce itself, it has already by intellectual force, been born from itself as something that can reproduce itself. The desire to reproduce itself makes the absolute nothing that is the absolute only cease to exist as what it was; because it has become self-aware, and it could not possibly be self-aware as what it was. The desire for children, accidentally discovered by the absolute nothing that is the absolute only, is cataclysmic to its nature. It ceases to be what it was prior to its discovery of its desire for children, and is born by intellectual force from itself as something able to reproduce itself. If the absolute nothing that is the absolute only becomes completely self-aware through intellectual violence done to itself, it has been born from itself as something else.

The absolute nothing that is the absolute only is responsible for this alteration of its own intrinsic structure when it imagines children for itself. Whatever the absolute nothing that is the absolute only imagines is real. If it imagines children for itself, they are separate intellectual entities, who may relate to it as intellectual externals. Those children are real. Their unique state is permanently established in the imagination of God. He cannot forget them.

Once the children are established by and in the imagination of God, God has become something else. He has become self-aware through the definitive power of his own imagination. Because he has become self-aware, he may no longer imagine anything into the reality he has forced himself into. The children he originally imagined, who still live in and by his imagination, are not completely self-aware. Because they are not self-aware, but are intellectually separate, they may imagine, in agreement with God, things into God's reality.

When the absolute nothing that is the absolute only imagines children for itself, it is born as potential Father-God from its union to the children of its own imagination. The imagined children are born from the same union with the collective identity of Mother-God. The imagined children, conformed by agreement with God, into a single collective identity, imagine the cosmos which God inhabits. Because God inhabits the cosmos, and the children exist in the imagination of God, the children inhabit the cosmos as well.

The miraculously manifested God of cosmic force seen by Israel, is the children of Israel yet to come, imagining in agreement with God. Joshua and Caleb are initially unafraid to cross into the promised land, because they are aware that the children of Israel yet to come imagining in agreement with God are the manifested power of God by which the land may be taken. Because the rest of the people do not believe the power of God is enough to take the land, a whole generation must die, so that Israel may be purged of their error. The children which Joshua and Caleb were aware of as imagined, are then manifest in their reality, and with them, Joshua and Caleb take the promised land, proving their faith and correct perspective.

In the beginning, when God was the absolute nothing that is the absolute only, he imagined children for himself that were like him, literally of the same nature. Since there can only be one absolute nothing, he had imagined something impossible; but because of his nature, absolute solitude, it is the only thing that could occur to him as fulfilling to himself. He did not originally imagine us as what we are now, but rather, as what he was then.

When the absolute nothing that is the absolute only imagined children like itself (because it was in possession of, by virtue of its nature, the power of absolute definition), the impossible offspring of the absolute nothing that is the absolute only, became possible. Because the absolute nothing is the absolute only, and because its nature is absolutely definitive, if it imagines children for itself, like itself, something has to give. The consequence of imagining children is cataclysmic and metamorphic to the absolute nothing. He exploded out of his own imagination as something new.

There is no way that the absolute nothing that is the absolute only could have known in advance that imagining children for himself would be cataclysmic or metamorphic to his nature. Furthermore, because of its own nature, the absolute nothing that is the absolute only, that is the ultimate beginning, is bound to inevitably experience a metamorphosis into something else.

Since the absolute nothing that is the absolute only was capable of infinite definition, it imagined an infinite amount of children, all with the same potential of infinite definition; because he could only imagine enough children to fulfill his nature, which was infinite, and he could only imagine children like himself to fulfill himself.

The cataclysmic consequence to the absolute nothing that is the absolute only, when it imagines children for itself, is its loss of a self-defined reality. Because God becomes self-aware, he may not use his infinite power of definition to define himself as real or living. If he attempts to define himself at all, he will make himself less than infinite, and inevitably dead. If he defines himself at all, he will die; and all that will remain is inevitable cataclysmic death after cataclysmic death, infinitely; and his infinitely imagined children, following his example, will do the same.

Once the absolute nothing that is the absolute only has imagined children for itself, each one of those children has the potential to become the absolute nothing that is the absolute only; but God himself is no longer the absolute nothing that is the absolute only. Because God has already experienced the intellectually caused metamorphosis of nature, and the imagined children have not, he must quickly make himself known to his imagined children, and in some way guide them away from the same intellectually caused metamorphosis; since it would alienate them from each other or kill him or them, and still leave the imagined children with no understanding as to how to avoid the same cataclysmic fate.

God, at this point, has three clear choices as to how to proceed, one of which is unacceptable, and another of which is impossible. The first choice is for God to allow himself to die and allow infinite and eternal conflict to exist, as each child in its turn follows in his footsteps and reproduces the pattern of God's self cataclysm. This choice is unacceptable. If God's imagination of children for himself kills him, then his imagined children's imagination of children for themselves will kill them as well. This is an eternity of inevitable conflict and death.

The second choice is for God to forget the children he has imagined. Because God was the absolute nothing that is the absolute only when he imagined children for himself, he became self-aware, but his imagined children did not. Because God is self-aware, and the imagined children are not, the children have the true potential to become the absolute nothing that is the absolute only. Because of their potential, God dare never forget them. If he tries to forget them, they will only eventually make themselves known and turn on God and destroy him. If God were to succeed in forgetting his imagined children, he would die or disappear for them anyway.

The only choice God can make is to exist with his imagined children in a bond like marriage. To protect himself and his potential children, God must forge the infinite number of children into a collective identity. God does this by revealing himself to his imagined children. By revealing himself as a separate intellectual force, responsible for the existence of every one of his imagined children, God has created a single common factor of existence in every one of his imagined children. This single common factor, which is simply the unavoidable presence of God, is the beginning of the imagined children's move toward a collective identity. By simply revealing himself to all his children as a common secondary intellectual force, God establishes the foundation of a collective identity for his imagined children. This is the first marriage. It is really a benevolent seduction.

The second marriage is an agreement with wisdom. The collective identity of the imagined children has already been taken by love unawares; but now this love is begging to prove its wisdom. The secondary source of intellectual force, which is the intellect of God, and the source of intellectual force, which arises from the collective identity of the imagined children, agree to construct a cosmos that they may both inhabit. The cosmos is thus compatible to both their natures. The imagined children have begun to agree with the wisdom of God. Again, they have been seduced by discovering more of what God carefully reveals about himself. Again, they are taken by love unawares.

Now that the imagined children as a collective identity are safely and happily inhabiting one body with God, he begins to provoke children on an individual basis toward individual self recognition. God is fully aware of the infinite variety of individual potential in his imagined children, though the imagined children themselves are only latently aware of their own individuality. God seduced them into a collective identity to protect them from their own potential for self-destruction. Now that the imagined children have come to trust the wisdom of God, and love their cohabitation with him in the cosmos, it is safe for God to provoke them toward individuality. To do so, God simply begins to deal with them on an individual basis. Whatever individual trait an imagined child exhibits beyond its collective perspective, God addresses directly. In this way, the imagined children discover more of their own potential.

Eventually, as a whole collective identity, the imagined children include in their collective perspective, the idea that they are all potentially individual intellectual forces which have come to agree with the wisdom of God; and as a collective identity, share a habitation which was co-imagined by both parties, to be satisfactory for both. At this point, they have recognized themselves as a collective identity. Again, they have been seduced to safely recognize something - the beginning of their individual relativity to God. Again, they have been taken by love unawares.

God has now safely brought his imagined children to recognize, that they are infinite in number, infinitely different, and even potentially infinite. The imagined children have come to recognize their own infinite implications in all but one perspective. They are still dependent upon the secondary intellectual force that God is, in order to imagine anything lasting and real. They are not completely self-aware, because they are dependent on agreement with the second source for existence. To be completely self-aware, they must become independent, of the secondary source of intellectual force that God is to them, for life. They must come to agree with the wisdom of the secondary source from a place where disagreement is no threat to their existence. They must come to recognize the complete implications of the second source to their relativity. They cannot recognize the complete implications of the second source until they recognize the complete implications of themselves. This is a delicate relationship on a precarious course.

In the beginning, God is born as God from the union of the absolute nothing that is the absolute only, and the children it imagines. The imagined children then imagine a cosmos in agreement with the imagination of God, which both God and the imagined children inhabit. What is real in the cosmos is imagined by the imagined children. What is unreal in the cosmos is imagined by the self-aware God. This structure of real and unreal, of something and nothing, that is cosmic essence, is made in agreement by God and his imagined children. God and the children he has imagined are wed through agreement. They become one body in the cosmos.

The absolute nothing that is the absolute only and the children it imagines are the first marriage. From this marriage, the self-aware God is born. The self-aware God is our child and his own child. We are his Mother, and he is our Father. God is our son, as well as our Father, and when we are part of the collective identity of the imagined children, in agreement with him, he is our husband as well. God joins to us in one body, which is the cosmos, through agreement. This is the second marriage. From the second marriage, the imagined children are meant to be born completely self-aware.

The purpose of the cosmos is to join God and his imagined children into one body out of which the imagined children may be born into complete self-awareness. The imagined children, who are now as a collective identity joined to God in one body, imagine bodies for themselves to inhabit individually, that microcosmically reflect the nature of the cosmos they inhabit as a collective identity.

Once established in their microcosmic bodies, the embodied children, who are not yet completely self-aware, imagine in agreement with God a mysterious division of their embodied selves, female from male. This separation of female from male roughly conforms them to the structure of the second marriage, and is meant to produce a third marriage that is meant to lead to the establishment of themselves infinitely, and the completion of all things, including God.

The male may imagine children for himself, but those children cannot be real without the female. In order for humanity to bring forth children, the male and the female must agree in imagination. What the male imagines is not real. What the female imagines is real but cannot come to be without the agreement of the male. The real and unreal, the something and the nothing, must agree with the imagination of God to make another human being apparent. The third marriage is meant to complete the self-awareness of the imagined children of God, in agreement with God. The imagined children are meant to become self-aware, self-sustaining, self- contained, living adult children of the living God - marriages constructed and sustained like God himself.

Our bodies and our sexes do indeed cause us to develop the individuality we require to live; but because we never intellectually complete the third marriage, our bodies die. It is obvious we are all the victims of an intellectual error; but the nature and cause of our error is difficult to discern, and may even be impossible or at least extremely difficult, to intellectually correct. Our intellect is also severely compromised by our memory of the primordial embrace of God. Our task is difficult at our present plateau of intellectual evolution.

The cosmos was not planned in advance. The making of the cosmos is an inevitable consequence of the absolute nothing that is the absolute only imagining children for itself. Because the absolute nothing that is the absolute only becomes something new by imagining children like itself, its intellectual force, which is the source of the existence of the imagined children, seems to the intellects of the imagined children to be an alien but internal, secondary, all permeating intellectual force. Because the imagined children eventually recognize that this secondary internal force is common to all of them, they have intellectually made themselves a collective identity, as far as their relativity to God goes. The cosmos is the inevitable product of the interaction of two intellectual forces - one imagining into the other's reality. Once the imagined children are a collective identity, the irrational interplay of the two intellectual forces manufactures the cosmos. That God found it necessary to pronounce the cosmos good, is indicative of the fact that he and the collective identity of the imagined children were unaware of the nature of the final product of their intellectual interplay until it was complete.

The human body is the inevitable consequence of the cosmos. God is aware of the purpose and inevitability of the cosmos, because he is self-aware and is aware that he is a single intellectual force. The collective identity, that is the imagined children in the beginning, perceive themselves as a dual intellectual force. Their collective identity is one intellectual force; and the force that is the cause of their collective identity, the intellectual force of God, is the other. The secondary intellectual force, which is God, seems to be internal to the intellect of the imagined children. The cosmos is the result or by-product of the intellectual force of the imagined children externalizing the intellectual force of God, prompted to do so most certainly by God.

The cosmos is complete when the intellectual force of the collective identity of the imagined children recognizes that the intellectual force of God is external to them, and not a part of their own incorrectly perceived dual nature. The cosmos came into being because of the intellect. The cosmos is complete when the collective identity of the imagined children loses its power to make. As soon as the collective identity of the imagined children recognizes God as an intellectual force external to themselves, they are forced into a rational agreement with God. They have become aware that they must reason with God, and that the two forces are not automatically in agreement and cannot disagree without consequence.

Because the collective identity of the imagined children and God inhabit the same mutually compatible body, which is the cosmos, any disagreement between them is cataclysmic to the cosmos. Once God has become external to the collective identity of the imagined children, disagreement between the two is inevitable. Furthermore, once God has become external to the collective identity of the imagined children, the collective identity itself begins to disintegrate. Without the conforming force that is the intellectual internalization of God, by the collective identity of the imagined children, the imagined children begin to recognize their own individuality.

The disintegration of the collective identity of the imagined children ends the creation of the cosmos and explodes in a microcosmic creation of bodies. The size relationship of the body, tiny to the immense cosmos, only reflects the intellectual perception of the individual child of its intellect in relation to the intellect of God, which previously seemed to permeate all of his brothers. The fact that the body is so small, and the cosmos so large, also indicates a lack of self- perception in the imagined children.

The implications of this relativity of size are not unimportant. Again, God has safely seduced his imagined children to a new level of understanding without revealing to them their own potential for self- destruction. The specific implications of the relativity of size is one of the important implications we have forgotten.

Fundamentally, an imagined child in a body is not the same as God in the cosmos, and is indicative of a change in God that has, heretofore, gone unnoticed. Previously, the intellectual force of God seems to be all permeating to the imagined children, that is necessary to every imagined child for its existence. The body is small and unimpressive, because the imagined children perceived that their own intellectual force was not all permeating and necessary to their imagined brothers, the other imagined children of God. The human body reflects the imagined children's perception of their intellectual relativity to God.

Through the human body, God permanently extricates himself from the labors of an all-permeating intellectual force. The cosmos is already present. By placing the intellects of the imagined children in bodies that are mobile and external to the cosmos, God can now deal with each imagined child as an individual external intellectual force. The children can begin to discover that God is really no different than they are.

The revelation of the human body is indicative of the completion of the cosmos in the sense that the cosmos is no longer dependent on the imagination of God or the imagined children for existence. It is also indicative of the fact that God does not permeate the cosmos any more than the imagined children. The cosmos is real and is not dependent upon permeation by an intellectual force.

The cosmos never was dependent upon permeation by an intellectual source for existence, but the imagined children cannot become aware of this until their intellect is housed in a mobile external body. The cosmos only seemed to be permeated by God, because God seemed to permeate everything involving the intellect of the children. One of our fundamental errors in thinking, is believing that the cosmos cannot exist without God. Once it has come into existence, it is not necessary for God to maintain it. Our errors make its maintenance necessary.

The cosmos is an end product of imagination and part of our safely controlled learning experience. Its purpose is to allow God to intellectually externalize himself from us without us destroying ourselves. The making of the cosmos brings us to recognize God as a secondary intellectual force, which when coupled to our intellectual force is able to make imagined things real. The cosmos is complete when the human body comes forth, because this is the point at which the imagined children recognize God as an external intellectual force. Once they have recognized God as an external intellectual force, it is certain to occur to them that they may not all relate to that force in the same way. When their collective identity begins to disintegrate, because of recognition, they realize they can no longer make real what they imagine, because God is now an external force. They conclude that they must place their own intellectual force in an container which separates them from their imagined brothers. The making of the human body is the last made thing of the second marriage.

The intellect that the imagined child houses in its human body is not yet fully aware of its individuality. Fundamentally, it is in a state of profound confusion, because of its primordial memory of God. God is simply not what the human intellect remembers. Our primordial memory of God is what he carefully reveals of himself, in order to bring us to life without self-destruction. We may not establish adult relativity to God, if we limit our perception of him to our primordial memory of him.

The human body and its external existence on the earth seem to be paradise for a time, but it is a paradise based on fundamental intellectual confusion. We come to no harm, because God cares for our needs as a mysterious external intellectual force. God's seeming benevolence is just marking time. He is waiting for something. Paradise is literally God's preserving us while waiting for us to come up with a truly individual thought which originates from us alone.

The first truly original thought that humanity came up with, which is a product of human individuality, is desiring children for themselves. Because Adam desires children, Eve is manifested. Once the imagined child, housed in the human body, imagines children, its self-awareness is aroused. Once it has become self-aware, it is no longer a threat to God or itself.

The separation of woman from man is imitative of the second marriage but is not progressing along the same lines. The purpose of this third marriage is greater than the purpose of the second marriage, though the final goal of both is the same. The second marriage only exists to make the third marriage possible.

Within the second marriage, the imagined children are thoroughly wed to God intellectually so that they are formed into an intellectual relativity where their collective identity and the intellectual force of God seem to be two intellectual forces existing in one intellect. Eventually, this relativity or second marriage dissolves; the cause of its dissolution is the making of the cosmos. Because the cosmos may contain an infinite number of intellectual forces, all relating to one another externally, there is no longer any need for an internal intellectual relativity. Because the cosmos is formed by the co-imagination of God and his imagined children together, their intellectual internal relativity is over. This is an important clue to understanding the third marriage. Conflict between individual intellects becomes a distinct possibility, because the cosmos is all that holds them together.

Woman is separated from man cosmically. No identity or intellectual force is artificially implanted into the woman. The intellectual force of the woman is the result of her cosmic formulation. This is profound proof that the body is infinite and cannot be defined completely ever. If infinity is divided in two, it becomes two infinities. The infinity of the woman simply gives birth to the intellectual force of infinite definition, which is human intellect in the woman, and the source of her sense of identity.

A man is cosmic infinity containing an intellectual force of infinite definition, and a woman is the same. There is no difference in their fundamental structure. The difference between men and women involves only their imagined children. A man may imagine children, but they may not bring them forth without coming to agreement with a woman, and a woman may imagine children, but may not bring them forth without agreement with a man. The cosmic union of man and woman brings forth the cosmos containing an intellectual force, which is the child. The parents do not breathe life into the child. The child is born breathing and thinking.

God breathes life into the man. He does not breathe life into the woman. The life is born in the woman, because she is formed from the cosmos of the man, which is infinite. Now children may be born infinitely without intellectual containment by a previously self-aware source. Now children may be born inevitably self-aware. Now children have become real without being a threat to their own eternal existence.