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Jacob and Olivia Inks Pyeatt

Jacob Pyatt was born c1792 in Missouri (or Pennsylvania) to John and ? Piatt and died August of 1865 near Fort Cummings, New Mexico. He married Olivia Inks (or McClure) who was born c1798 in Kentucky and who died between 1870 and 1879 in Downey, Los Angeles County, California. Olivia's son, Andrew McClure Pyeatt, is supposed to have had mother's maiden name as 'McClure' on his death certificate while her son, William Dudley Pyeatt, had 'Inks' on his death certificate. Obviously, neither of these men provided that information for themselves. It is left to us to wonder which gave his wife or child the correct information.

I find both Inks and McClure families living near Jacob and Olivia in Jefferson County, Missouri. The William and Sarah Pike Inks who lived next door to Jacob had a daughter, Sarah Inks, who married Benjamin Griffin Brown; a son, Elisha Inks, who married Amelia/Emily Wilson; a daughter, Sarah Inks, who married William Blount Carter; a daughter, Catherine Inks, who married Andrew McClure; son, William C Inks, who married Anna Eliza King. The McClure family that married into the Inks family was the line of Josiah and Sarah Harris McClure who came from Bowling Green, Kentucky, in 1819. They had 8 daughters and one son, Andrew McClure (from above), the sixth child. Andrew [1805-1877] became a Presbyterian minister. Some names of the Inks/McClure children include: Almira, Isabella and Olivia. If you put those names together with the parents above...you could almost name all of Jacob and Olivia's children. Additionally, Jacob and Olivia's son, John, was married to a Julia who is thought to be an Inks. I believe that Andrew McClure Pyeatt was named for the Andrew McClure above just as I believe his brothers were named for James Benton and William Dudley.

We do not know where or when Jacob and Olivia married, though John Keich suggests c1816 due to the ages of their known and/or speculated children.

Some speculated children of Jacob and Olivia include:

Known children of Jacob and Olivia include:

I have to wonder if the Agnes Pyatt born c1824 who married Frederick Wengler is also their child. In 'Encyclopedia of the History of Missouri, A Compendium of History and Biography for Ready Reference' edited by Howard L. Conard, Volume VI, The Southern History Company, 1901:" it says that Frederick Wengler "entered a tract of 160 acres of land on Boone Creek, in Franklin County, the remainder of that beautiful valley being entered by John Pyatt, whose daughter, Agnes, he married shortly after completing his engagement with Judge McCullough, September 1, 1842". I need to search Franklin County records to see if I can find land or tax records to support this statement. Franklin County is where John and Julia ?Inks Pyeatt and many of Jacob and Olivia's other sons lived. Could someone have confused Agnes' older brother's name for that of her father? John Pyeatt born c1817 is not old enough to be Agnes' father. Was her father's name really Jacob? Since he didn't have the presence in Franklin County that John and his descendants had, could someone writing about Agnes in 1901 really know what her father's name was? Agnes was very close to John and Julia Pyeatt and Elisha Pyeatt in Franklin County. The possibility exists that if John Pyeatt the Pioneer did have a son, John, who died before 1827 - that some of the children we attach to Jacob and Olivia are his. But, that would leave them with large holes in the spacing of their children.

City of St Louis Deed Book Book N pg 118 (copies from microfilm at the archive office of the St Louis City Courthouse. Dec 2001) records the following: This Indenture made and concluded at the City and County of St. Louis and State of Missouri this first day of April in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred & twenty six by and between August Chouteau & Terese Cerre his wife of the city and county aforesaid of one part and Jacob Pyeath of the same county aforesaid , of the other part Witnesseth that the said Auguste Chouteau and Therese his wife for and in consideration Of the sum of Seventy – five dollars lawful money of the United States to them the said Auguste Chouteau and wife in hand paid at and before the unsealing and delivering of these presents, by the said Jacob Pyeatt the receipt whereof is hereby acknowledged, and thereof, and of every part and parcel thereof the said Jacob Pyeatt his heirs and assigns are hereby acquitted exonerated and discharged forever, they the said Auguste Chouteau and Therese his wife have given granted bargained and sold and do hereby give, grant bargain and sell, unto the said Jacob Pyeatt, his heirs, and assigns forever a certain parcel or piece of land lying and being situate near the marramick river in the County aforesaid. Said land being part of a league square confirmed to said Auguste Chouteau under Louis Courtois containing fifty arpents and bounded as follows viz: Beginning at the SE corner of a tract sold to Wm Inks thence with the south eastern boundary line of said Inks. 59 ½ W twenty three chins to an ash 24in diameter corner. Thence S 29 ½ E 18ch 50 to a small Hickory on the brow of the hill thence N 59 ½ E 23ch to a red budd on the N.E. boundary line of the original tract thence with said last line N 29 ½ W 18ch 50 to the point of beginning. To have and hold the said granted and bargained premises with all the singular appertuenances and privileges thereof or thereunto in anywise or manner belonging appertaining as aforesaid unto him the said Jacob Pyeatt his heirs and assigns forever free and clear of all kind of encumberances whatever. In witness whereof the contracting parties of the first part have hereunto set their hand and affixed their seals in presence of
Henry Chouteau // Auguste Chouteau (seal)
? B Penrose // Cerre Chouteau (seal)
State of Missouri County of St Louis // Be it remembered that on this 6th day of May AD eighteen hundred and twenty six, before me a justice of the peace within and for the county aforesaid – personally came August Chouteau and Cerre Chouteau his wife both personally known to me to be the persons wherein named are subscribed to the foregoing instrument of writing as having executed the same and severally acknowledged the same to be their act and deed for the purpose therein mentioned. she the said Cerre being by me first made acquainted with the contents thereof and examined separate and a part from her husband whether she executed the said deed and relinquishes her dower to the lands and tenements therein mentioned voluntarily freely and with out compulsion or undue {page torn} Taken and Certified the day & year aforesaid {page torn}
Recorded 12th Jul? 1826 Arch Gamble Recor {page torn}

We know this property was bought by this same Jacob Pyeatt born c1793, as he and his wife Olivia later sell it to John Pyeatt.

Jacob's father died c1827. On the 1830 census Jacob had four males other than himself and four females other than Olivia living in his household. I believe the male under 5 years old was his son James Benton Pyeatt who was born c1827. The male age 5-10 born 1820-1825 is probably a son, Elijah. I think the male age 10-15 is his son, John c1817. I believe the other male 30-40 in Jacob's household in 1830 is his brother Christopher born c1795. The females are harder to identify as I do not have dates of birth for Jacob's sisters. The female age 5-10 could be a daughter, Jane, born c1819. One of the two females 10-15 could be daughter, Sarah; and the other could be Jacob's sister, Jane, who did not marry until 1834 or daughter Jane born c1819. Jacob's sister Nancy was already married by 1827 and it appears as if Mary was already married to Hiram Smith by then and sister Katherine to John Pruitt. Jacob's brother, Frederick, was living next door with a wife. This would be Permelia Smith Biddick Pyeatt according to Biddick family researchers. This would account for all of John Piatt's children except for Benjamin who could not be the unidentified male as he is old enough to administer the estate. The other alternative is that John's children were living elsewhere and that all of these children belong to Jacob and Olivia.

On the 1840 census of St. Louis County, Missouri, Jacob had five males and four females and a wife at this time. One male under five years old would be his son Andrew McClure. One male five to ten would be his son, William Dudley. A male ten to fifteen would be his son, James Benton. The male fifteen to twenty years old (born 1820-1825) is probably a son, Elisha. A male twenty to thirty years old could be Christopher - or - as Frederick is not listed as a head of household, he and his wife could be living with Jacob's family (I believe Frederick was in Ste. Genevieve County, Missouri, by this time, but, I do not find him on the 1840 index). The female under five years old is probably Jacob and Olivia's daughter. Who are the two females twenty to thirty? Daughters Sarah and Jane were married by this time. There is also an unidentified thirty to forty year old female. Could some or all of Jacob's sisters be widowed and living with him? Could these be servants or boarders? Again, they could be older children of Jacob and Olivia.

Living next door to Jacob and Olivia in 1840 was John Pyatt age 20-30 or born c1810-1820. I think this is Jacob and Olivia's son, John b: c1817. He also has another male 20-30 years old in his household. I need to abstract a John Pyeatt in 1850 St Louis MO which may give me some more information on this John (turns out to be a Pratt?).

In the City of St Louis deed book Book T6 pg 14 (From copies obtained from the City of St Louis Courthouse Dec 2001. MCP) This Indenture, Made and concluded this thirty first day of October in the year of our Lord eighteen hundred and forty nine by and between Jacob Pyeatt and Olivia his wife of the County of St. Louis and State of Missouri of the first part and John Pyeatt of the same County and State of the second part. Witnesseth that the said party of the first part for and in consideration of the sum of four hundred dollars to them in hand paid the receipt whereof the party of the first part does hereby acknowledge have given granted bargained and sold, confirmed and conveyed and by these presents doth give, grant, bargain, sell, confirm and convey unto him the said John Pyeatt and his heirs and assigns forever a certain tract or parcel of land situated on the Waters of Flat Creek in the County and State aforesaid said land being a part of a league square tract of land confirmed to August Choteau by deed bearing date the first day of April 1826 and bounded as follows (viz) Beginning at the S.E. Corner of a tract of land which August Choteau sold to William Inks thence with the South East boundary line of said Inks S. 59 ½ W twenty three chains to an ash 24 inches in diameter thence S. 29 ½ E. Eighteen chains and 50 links to a small hickory on the brow of the hill thence N. 59 ½ E twenty three chains to a red bud on the North east boundary line of the original tract thence with said line N. 29 ½ W. eighteen chains fifty links to the place of beginning containing fifty arpents – to have and to hold the above described premises with all and singular the appurtenances and privileges thereof or thereunto in anywise appertaining as aforesaid unto him the said John Pyeatt his heirs and assigns forever, free and clear of all in incumbrances whatever. In testimony whereof, the said Jacob Pyeatt and Olivia his wife have hereunto set their hands and seals the day and year aforesaid. Jacob (his mark) Pyeatte (seal) // Olivia (her mark) Pyeatte (seal) Attest: Robert Patton State of Missouri County of St. Louis // Be it remembered that on the twelfth day of November in the year of our Lord eighteen hundred and forty nine personally came before me a justice of the Peace in and for the County of St. Louis, the within named Jacob Pyeatt and Olivia his wife known to me to be the persons who are parties to the first part of the foregoing deed of conveyance and acknowledged the foregoing deed of conveyance to be theire act and deed for the use and purpose therein mentioned. And she the said Olivia Pyeatt being by me made acquainted with the foregoing deed separate and apart from her husband declared she relinquished her right of dower to the foregoing described premises without fear or undue influences of her husband. Robert Patton J. P. (seal) Filed & Recorded June 16th 1853 S. D. Barlow, Recorder

And in deed book V6 pg 149 Book (From copies obtained from the City of St Louis Courthouse Dec 2001. MCP) This deed, made and entered into this thirteenth day of June eighteen hundred and fifty three by and between John Pyeatt and Julia his wife, of the county of St. Louis, and state of Missouri, parties of the first part, and Enoch Price of the city of St. Louis county and state aforesaid party of the second part, witnesseth, that the said parties of the first part, in consideration of nine hundred dollars, to them paid by the said party of the second part, the receipt of which is hereby acknowledged, do by these presents give grant bargain sell confirm and convey unto the said party of the second part, his heirs and assigns forever, a certain tract or parcel of land situated on the waters of flat creek in the county and state aforesaid, said land being a part of a league square tract conveyed to August Choteau under Louis Courtor’s and conveyed to Jacob Pyeatt by said August Choteau by deed bearing date the first day of April 1826 and as follows, viz: beginning at the S. E. corner of a tract of land which August Choteau sold to William Inks, thence with the south east boundary line of said Inks S. 59 ½ W. twenty thre chains, to an Ash 24 inches in diameter thence S. 29 ½ E. eighteen chains and 50 links to a small hickory on the brow of the hill, thence ?N. 59 ½ E. twenty three chains to a red bud on the north east boundery line of the original tract, thence with said line ?N. 29 ½ W. eighteen chains fifty links to the place of beginning containing fifty (50) arpens. To have and to hold the same, together with all the rights, immunities, privileges and appurtenances to the same, belonging to the said party of the second part, and to his heirs and assigns forever; the said John Pyeatt and Julia his wife hereby covenanting that he & they and their heirs, executors, and administrators, shall and will warrant and defend the title to the premises to the said party of the second part, and to his heirs and assigns, forever, against the lawful claims of all persons whomsoever. In witness whereof, the said parties of the first part have hereunto set their hands and seals the day and year first above written. John Pyeatt (seal) // Julia (her mark) Pyeatt (seal)
Executed in presence of S. S.
State of Missouri County of St. Louis // Be it remembered that on this thirteenth day of June A. D. eighteen hundred and fifty three before me, the undersigned, Justice of the peace in and for St. Louis county came John Pyeatt and Julia his wife both of whom are personally known to me to be the same persons whose names are subscribed to the foregoing instrument of writing, as parties thereto, and they severally acknowledged the same to be there act and deed for the purposes therein mentioned. And the said Julia Pyeatt being by me made acquainted with the contents of said deed on an examination separate and apart from her said husband acknowledged that she executed the same & relinquished her dower in the real estate therein mentioned freely and without compulsion or undue influence of her said husband. In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand the day and year first above written. William S. Holloway, Justice of the peace
Filed and recorded July 26, 1853 S. A. Barlow, Recorder

Book V6 pg 419 (From copies obtained from the City of St Louis Courthouse Dec 2001. MCP) This deed made and entered into this (14th) fourteenth day of November eighteen hundred and fifty three by and between Jacob Pyeatt and Olivia his wife all of the County of ______ and State of Texas parties of the first Part and John Pyeatt of the County and State aforesaid party of the Second Part Witnesseth that the said parties of the first Part in consideration of the sum of Four hundred dollars to them in hand paid by the said party of the second Part the Receipt of which is hereby acknowledged do by these presents give grant bargain sell confirm and convey unto the said party of the second Part his heirs and assigns forever a certain tract or parcel of land situated on the Waters of the flat creek in the County of Saint Louis and State of Missouri said land being a part of a league Square tract of land confirmed to August Choteau under Louis Courtois and conveyed to Jacob Pyeatt by said August Choteau by Deed bearing date the first day of Aprile 1826 and bounded as follows (viz:) beginning at the S. E. Corner of a tract of land which August Choteau sold to William Inks thence with the South East boundary line of said Inks S. 59 ½ W. twenty three chains to an ash 24 inches in diameter thence S. 29 ½ E. Eighteen chains and 50 links to a small hickory on the brow of the hill thence N. 59 ½ E twenty three chains to a red bud on the north East boundary line of the Original tract thence with said line ?N 29 ½ W. Eighteen chains fifty links to the place of beginning containing fifty (50) arpens. To Have and to Hold the Same together with all the Rights immunities privileges and appurtenances to the same belonging unto the said Party of the second part and to his heirs and assigns forever, the said Jacob Pyeatt and Olivia his wife hereby covenanting that they and their heirs executors and administrators shall and will warrant and defend the title to the premises to the said party of the second Part and to his heirs and assigns forever against the lawful claims of all persons whomsoever. In witness whereof the same Parties of the first Part have hereunto set their hands and seals the day and year first above written. Jacob (his mark) Pyeatt (Seal) // Olivia (her mark) Pyeatt (Seal)
Executed in presence of P. Gooch // A. Harrison State of Texas County of Williamson // Be it Remembered that on this fourteenth day of November A. D. Eighteen hundred and fifty three before me the undersigned Clerk of the County Court in and for the County & State aforesaid came Jacob Pyeatt and Olivia Pyeatt his wife both of whom are personally known to me to be the same persons to be the same person whose name are subscribed to the foregoing instrument of writing as parties thereto and who acknowledge the same to be their act and deed for the Purpose therein mentioned. And the said Olivia Pyeatt being by me made acquainted with the Contents of said Deed on an examination separate and apart from her said husband acknowledged that she executed same & made her mark as her signature by which the relinquished her dower in the Real Estate therein mentioned freely and without compulsion or undue influence of her said Husband - & did not wish to retract. (Seal)
In Testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand and affixed the impress of my official seal at office in Georgetown on the 14th day of November A. D. 1853. P. Gooch Clk C. C. W. County
Filed and Recorded February 24, 1854 C. Keemle Recorder

In summary, in October of 1849 Jacob and Olivia sold the piece of land which Jacob had bought in 1826 from August Chouteau to a John Piatt. This John Piatt was born c1816 according to census records on which he appears with his wife Julia. John and Julia later sold this property to Enoch Price.

In a similar deed dated 1853, Jacob and Olivia, sell another parcel of this same property to John Piatt and are living in Williamson County, Texas. Therefore, their removal to Texas most likely occurred during the summer of 1850 - which I say because I have not located them on any census and have to wonder if they were between towns. I have not located the family on the 1850 census of Texas (I viewed the entire 1850 Williamson, Fayette, San Saba and Burleson County, Texas) or Illinois, Louisiana, Missouri, Indiana, etc. I have done searches of the 1850 census index at Ancestry.com for Jacob Pyeatts and have tried to investigate them all. They are either misspelled enough to not be caught with soundex or they were not enumerated. I need to make sure that I have located all of their children in 1850.

Jacob Pyeatt appears in the tax records of Williamson County, Texas, in the year 1854. Of note, on the 1850 Williamson County, Texas, census were a cluster of families - Abner Gregg, Charles Harris, Hamon Smelser and Fielding Dawson who were all Jefferson County, Missouri, transplants. They all moved to San Saba County, Texas, before the 1860 census when they all live in proximity to the Pyeatts there. If one had to guess as to a reason for Jacob to choose to move to Williamson and then San Saba County, Texas, these families would most likely be the reason. It is also noted that the Shultz and Hart families of Jefferson County, Missouri, who were neighbors and friends of the Pyeatt family moved to Fayette County, Texas about 1854. Living near and appearing on deed records together with the Gregg's, Smelser's, etc. is Thomas M Hornsby whose daughter married Jacob and Olivia's son, William, in 1853 in Burnett County, Texas (adjoins Williamson).

Jacob appears with sons James Benton Pyeatt and Andrew McClure Pyeatt in San Saba County, Texas, tax lists from 1856 to 1865. Jacob owned horses and cattle over the years – quite a few cattle actually. So, I am somewhat surprised that he did not register a brand in San Saba County as did James and Andrew. While Jacob apparently lived in San Saba County several years before and after the 1860 census, I can find no trace of him in San Saba County during that census enumeration. In fact, I can find him no where on the 1860 census (deja vue the 1850 census). However, James and family along with Andrew, do appear on the 1860 census of San Saba County. Jacob and Andrew disappear from San Saba County tax lists in 1865 as they migrated west. I find a Jacob Pyeatt registering a cattle brand in Williamson County, Texas, after Jacob Pyeatt disappears from the San Saba County tax lists. Did our Jacob move briefly back to Williamson County or did he retain property there?

A history of San Saba, Texas, claims that James Benton Pyeatt and Andrew McClure Pyeatt came there in 1855 "with thier father". I found that to be borne out by tracing the tax records for Jacob Pyeatt.

I found the following tax record in Williamson County, Texas, for 1854:

  • Pyeatt, Jac 3 horses $75; 12 cattle $72; total $147; state tax 22 cents; county tax 11 cents

    Then the rest are for San Saba County, Texas, as follows:

  • 1857 Pyeatt, Jacob 2 horses $66 (also sons J B and Andrew)
  • 1858 Pyatt, J 3 horses $125; ?38 cattle ?$216 (also sons A M and J B)
  • 1859 Pyatt, J 4 horses $200; 40 cattle $240; total $440 (also sons J B and A M)
  • 1860 Pyatt, Jacob 4 horses $160; 50 cattle $300; misc personal property $20; Total $480 (also sons A M and B)
  • 1861 Pyatt, Jacob 100 cattle $600; total $600 (also sons A M and J B)
  • 1862 Pyeatt, Jacob 134 cattle $804 (also sons J B and A M)
  • 1863 (page #6 M - R surnames not filmed or missing from records)
  • 1864 Pyeatte, J Conf TX notes $50; Tax on Conf notes 75 cents; livestock $990; total $1040; poll tax 1.25; state tax 5.90; county tax 11.95 (also sons A M and J B)
  • 1865 Pyeatte, J livestock $1200; total $1200; poll tax 1.00; state tax 6.00 (also sons A M and J B)

    In May of 1865, two wagon trains left out of Texas headed for California. A 4 wagon train led by Willis Newton started out on May 2, 1865. When they arrived just north of El Paso, Texas, they met up with the Cole wagon train (23 or 27 wagons) led by Captain Jack Cole that had left from the San Saba County area. The Cole train was mostly made up of Jack's family, his elderly parents, a married brother and his family, a married sister and her family, 2 unmarried brothers and a collection of nieces and nephews. In that train were also Jacob and Olivia Pyeatt along with their son, Andrew McClure Pyeatt and his family. Jacob and others became ill around the El Paso area. It was decided to push ahead 54 miles to the next water outside of Fort Cummings, New Mexico, on the Rio Mimbres River. At this point, it was decided that Jacob Pyeatt was not going to survive. They laid low the next day and the next morning he had died. Surprisingly, the previous year George W Cole had made this same trek and had written home upon arriving in California to inform his family that Uncle Billy Cole had died and that he had buried him just outside Fort Cummings on the Rio Mimbres River. It was decided to locate the grave of Billy Cole so that they could bury his lifelong friend, Jacob Pyeatt, beside him. They found the graveyard and the 'headboard' with Billy's name on it. Willis Newton claimed that it was the first and only time that he helped to bury someone where there was no coffin or box of any type to bury him in. Willis Newton wrote "The Recollections of an Octogenarian" around 1920 that told the story of this wagon train.

    The cemetery in Fort Cummings only shows one official grave. Trey Smith searched the microfilm roll titled "Headquarters Records of Fort Cummings, New Mexico 1863-1873 and 1880-1884" published in 1981. He looked at all records from 1864 and 1865 and found no mention of the Jacob Pyeatt, Billy Cole or the wagon trains.

    It took eight months to reach California. However, before they arrived at their destination, the wagon train was stopped at Fort Bowie in Arizona Territory. All ex-confederate soldiers were questioned. There were a total of 31 men reported to have been stopped. According to the dates of their interrogation, these men were traveling with the Cole/Newton train: Isaac E Boyce age 41; J S Burchett age 22; Alfred T Cole age 18; William Kolb age 37; Isaac M Cole; Andrew J Cole age 36; Ben F Cole age 32; William H Morrow age 18; Ethan A Washburn age 28; William G Wilkins age 23 and Andrew M Pyeatt age 30. Boyce, Burchett, Kolb, Pyeatt and Alfred T Cole all claimed they were from Hunter's Texas State Militia. John S Birchett was the brother of Andrew's wife, Vinah Birchett. Also on this wagon train were members of the Jefferson Warren family. Jefferson Warren's daughter, Margaret, was married to Jacob and Olivia's son, James Benton Pyeatt.

    To add another interesting dimension, in 2011, the bounty land records for service in the War of 1812 were added to the GLO website. A "Jaocb Pyeatt" through his assignee and attorney in fact "William C Inks" sold 40 acres that he had obtained for his service to "Basil Duke" (could this be "Basil Inks"?) who then sold it to "Gustavus Cohrs" in the same document. Jacob was in "Connoway's Company" in "McNair's Regiment" in "Missouri Militia" as a "private". The warrant #92366 was dated in September of 1866 and was based on the 1850 script law that granted additional property to veterans. To my knowledge, the only Jacob Pyeatt in Missouri in 1812 who was the right age to serve in the war was the Jacob Pyeatt 1792-1865. Additionally, he had close ties to William C. Inks who was involved with this transaction. I know that Jacob had died by 1866 and William C. Inks had died in 1865, however, I feel that this application would have been done many months before the warrant was granted and Jacob and William could have died in the meantime. If all the paperwork had been done and signed, (in theory) their deaths probably wouldn't have affected the settlement of the property to Jacob. It is also likely that Jacob Pyeatt who had moved to Texas in the 1850s would have felt the need to assign someone as his agent since he was no longer in the state of Missouri. I ordered the military bounty land application file in April of 2104 from NARA.

    Research by Trey Smith of Austin, Texas, shows that Olive Pyeatt was one of seven adults and 2 children who were charter members of the First Baptist Church in Los Nietos which is now Downey, California. This church was begun on September 19, 1868 and is still in operation today. Other wagon train members were heavily involved in this church.

    On the 1870 census of Los Nietos, Los Angeles County, California, Olivia appeared with her son, Andrew:

    This family was enumerated 10 Aug 1870 #161/165 pg 581B Los Nietos Twp, Los Angeles County. Their neighbors were #151 John Kline, #152 Julius Swanson, #153 Frank Stout, #154 Alfred Averill, #155 John C Ardis, #156 William Keller, #157 John K Dickson and Ann E Laburthon, #158 James H Buske, #159 Daniel McCarty, #160 James Maloney, #162 James Stewart, #163 George W Cole, #164 Samuel J Thompson, #165 Samuel C Reynolds, #166 James ?Slanther, #167 Henry Owens, and #168 John F McKee.

    Notice that George W Cole is one of their neighbors.

    How much longer did Andrew live in Los Nietos? Olivia is buried in the Little Lake Cemetery in Santa Fe Springs, California near Downey and Los Nietos along with two of Andrew's daughters who died in 1879. I do not know what year she died, but, sometime between 1870 and 1880. Her listing on Findagrave shows "Olive Pyealt" along with "Nettie Pyealt" and "Elizabeth Pyealt". Rex Pyeatt in Mulvane, Kansas, has a portrait of an elderly lady that says 'Pa's grandmother' on the back. Pa was W B Pyeatt a son of William Dudley Pyeatt and grandson of Jacob and Olivia. So, this would either be his mother's mother, Beth Helton, or Olivia Pyeatt. Since Beth Helton was dead by 1850 - I have to believe this portrait is of Olivia Pyeatt.

    Sources:

    Updated Aopr 2014

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